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buzzypeterson
10-22-2019, 06:05 PM
A friend wants to verify that he can enter Canada. He had a DWI years ago and some other minor things on his record. Do you guys know of any way to submit his I formation and check to see if he is advisable?


rickair7777
10-22-2019, 06:41 PM
Contact the nearest Canadian consulate before you travel. IIRC for the DWI you need five (?) years passed and "rehabilitation", which means of course a hefty fee.

FollowMe
10-22-2019, 08:19 PM
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6e/Strange_Brew_%28theatrical_poster%29.jpg


Excargodog
10-23-2019, 12:38 AM
It isn’t just a DWI. A lot of other infractions - including some serious and some that the US has often considered sort of ‘youthful indiscretions’ (such as reckless driving, speeding above the max limit in that state, racing another vehicle, etc.) - are a bar to entry into Canada.
Your ‘friend’ may have screwed him/herself for AT LEAST five years from the date of the completion of their sentence, even if the initial charge was subsequently reduced to a lesser offense.

As of December 2018, a DUI is a serious crime in Canada and such an offense no longer qualifies for automatic Deemed Rehabilitation after ten years. This significant change is due to the Government of Canada implementing new DUI laws that increased the maximum length of imprisonment to a decade. Consequently, impaired driving offenses are now considered too serious to qualify for Deemed Rehabilitation by virtue of time, and an American with a single DWI can now be denied entry at the Canadian border even if the offense occurred more than ten years ago.

Oftentimes it is easier (although not necessarily easy) to get the US conviction modified or recategorized, although even that may not allow them to subsequently get Canadian entry depending on the wording of the individual law and potential max term of punishment in the individual USstate where the infraction was committed.

Your ‘friend’ needs to talk to an attorney and that’s going to be costly.

Bahamasflyer
10-23-2019, 08:34 AM
Apologies in advance for my rant.....:but why is Canada THAT dense to deny crew members entry who are simply there not only to do their job, but also bring in thousands of dollars of revenue to Canada?

Bush 41 was convicted of DUI, yet not a peep about him being hassled when wanting to visit the north....

OK fine.......deny them entry for a fishing trip or a bachelor party....I have no problem with that. But for WORK, especially when they bring in so much revenue by flying there?

And pleaseeeeee.........spare me the “their country their rules” diatribe.

Heck.........even China and Russia won’t deny a US Citizen entry for a DUI conviction. I don’t think there is any other country that I’ve heard of anyway who would deny a US citizen entry for a misdemeanor, especially when many years have passed after the offense.

And this BTW is coming from someone with a completely clean criminal record

rickair7777
10-23-2019, 08:49 AM
It was probably Bush 43, I doubt senior would drive drunk. There's also something called diplomatic immunity for visiting heads of state. It would not make sense for Canada to deny entry of a US President over something like which happened decades prior. Also when it happened (and I lived that era) a DUI was little more than a more expensive moving violation. They'd either drive you home or take downtown to sober up and then let you go.

I don't think Canada specifically targeted DUI, their rule is that any serious crime is disqualifying, and that's based on the seriousness of the crime in Canada. They consider DUI pretty serious (as does Europe and many other places). They do have a reasonable right to do that. We wouldn't let a convicted armed robber into the US.

Bahamasflyer
10-23-2019, 09:26 AM
Yes it was Bush 43 not 41. Good catch

My beef is with them denying entry when it is related to work, not vacation. Big difference between flying there as a crew and bringing in thousands of dollars of revenue versus visiting there as a tourist, where the potential to get into trouble is far far greater

The two should be looked at drastically differently

galaxy flyer
10-23-2019, 03:24 PM
Any case law to support that argument. Work doesn’t obviate the crime in Canadian law nor in US law.

TiredSoul
10-23-2019, 06:25 PM
Try getting into Japan and being a d!ck.
Question on their immigration form:
Have you ever been convicted of ANY crime or offense in ANY country?

As far as the question as to why?
They don’t need YOU to enter the country to bring them tourists to spend money.
You’re not the only pilot in the USA.

Excargodog
10-23-2019, 08:00 PM
My beef is with them denying entry when it is related to work, not vacation. Big difference between flying there as a crew and bringing in thousands of dollars of revenue versus visiting there as a tourist, where the potential to get into trouble is far far greater

The two should be looked at drastically differently

Right. They don’t trust your judgement to drive on their roads in two dimensions with only yourself and two or three other people in the car but you somehow expect them to trust you with a 40 ton regional jet in three dimensions doing Mach .82 with 76 passengers (their citizens and those tourists you describe bringing in those dollars) in it in the sky above one of their (relatively few) larger cities.

Anybody but me see any possiblei flaws in THAT logic?