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View Full Version : Do I need to still disclose this?


ShruteFarms
11-03-2019, 08:25 AM
Several years ago I had a letter of warning for an altitude deviation. It was expunged 2 years later. Last year I moved regionals. I disclosed it on my application to be safe, and my current airline didn’t care. When I received a copy of my FAA PRIA the warning letter was not on there.

Trying to move on to a major now. Question is, if I still need to disclose this. I know the majors are a lot pickier and id like to try and be more competitive. It appears it’s indeed been expunged and no longer exists. But let’s say I received an offer from a major. When they got my PRIA, would they see that I disclosed that to my previous regional? Said in another way, is the application you have on file with your current airline, included as part of the PRIA package that gets sent to your next airline?

I forgot to request a copy of my employers PRIA when I moved regionals. So I’ve never seen a employers PRIA report before and couldn’t find this answer online.


CLRtoPush
11-03-2019, 09:01 AM
You shall disclose everything!!!!! To include number and frequency of all time outs you received as a child!!!!

Pogey Bait
11-03-2019, 10:05 AM
Obtain your “complete airman file”, not just a PRIA or whatever you did.

https://www.faa.gov/forms/index.cfm/go/document.information/documentid/186615


rickair7777
11-03-2019, 11:30 AM
Do you "need" to disclose everything?

They "expect" you to disclose everything they asked for.

Is the question "can I get away with lying"? The answer to that is maybe but there's only one to find out for sure and you won't know the answer until the day you retire because if they EVER find out they'll pretty terminate you immediately. That WILL turn up on a PRIA search.

Packrat
11-03-2019, 02:06 PM
Do you "need" to disclose everything?

They "expect" you to disclose everything they asked for.

Is the question "can I get away with lying"? The answer to that is maybe but there's only one to find out for sure and you won't know the answer until the day you retire because if they EVER find out they'll pretty terminate you immediately. That WILL turn up on a PRIA search.

^^^^^This. Read and heed.^^^^^

John Carr
11-03-2019, 02:06 PM
As mentioned, YES, you need to disclose it. As well as the “have you ever been under investigation” question.

What most people see as a “black mark/negative” is ACTUALLY a positive as long as there aren’t other issues.

Meaning, if/WHEN they ask you about it, or even in a “TMMAT you made a mistake situation it’s a PERFECT opportunity talk about an error mistake, what you learned, and how it made you batter safer pilot going forward.

And in the process, can make the interview shorter/eliminate a few questions and help you move into the “we need to hire this pilot” column versus the opposite.

It’s been years, YEARS since I filled out an app. But as I recall, airlineapps has something like an “outcome/resolution” field to type in? If so, fill that out. No need for a lengthy explanation. Just the short/sweet details.

As in, “committed X offense, was placed under investigation, received a warning letter that was expunged at the 2 year point”, etc.

All that crapped worked out great in my interviews.

rmcbear08
11-03-2019, 06:30 PM
What most people see as a “black mark/negative” is ACTUALLY a positive as long as there aren’t other issues.



Meaning, if/WHEN they ask you about it, or even in a “TMMAT you made a mistake situation it’s a PERFECT opportunity talk about an error mistake, what you learned, and how it made you batter safer pilot going forward.

Anybody who is currently dealing with a situation like this (accident/incident, LOI, warning letter, etc.) please read, re-read and then for good measure, read these two statements again.

Several years ago I was involved in an incident. Completely 100% my fault, total bonehead mistake. I’m just very glad that nobody was hurt and the airplane was still usable afterwards. I thought for sure my career was over, or at least the idea of flying for my dream carrier (or any other large carrier for that matter).

Fast forward to present day and it’s been almost a year since I got hired by said dream carrier. I didn’t give up, kept trying and applying and eventually when the interview came I knew how to talk about my mistake. I honestly think it separated me from the rest of the group and showed just how grateful I was to even be in that position; interviewing for a major. This “scarlet letter” I thought I was burdened with for the rest of my flying career turned out to be the thing that probably landed me the job.

You are not your mistakes. I know we would all like to have perfect records; no check ride failures, no DUIs, no letters in our files, etc. The truth is that we all fall short at some point. What you do when that happens is what ultimately determines your path forward. How will you take this experience and make yourself better for it? Only you can decide that. Just know that it isn’t the career ender like you think it is.

Check ‘YES’ on your applications and when you do finally get the interview and the job, you’ll feel so much better about it. Or spend the rest of your days constantly in fear, looking over your shoulder and wondering if this is the day they finally find out. Your call.

Peabody17
11-05-2019, 04:00 AM
ShruteFarms,

If you’re asking the question, it’s too early for you to be applying to a major. Chill out until the urge to lie goes away, then consider applying.