Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




AirBear
12-05-2019, 07:20 PM
I'm trying to help out a member of a Facebook diabetic pilot group. As some of you know, a few weeks ago the FAA announced they're going to start giving Class 1 medicals to insulin dependent diabetics. A lot of hoops to jump thru, and at least a 6 month process.

I'm trying to get this guy over on our forum but in the meantime this is his situation. He flew cargo DC-8's and 727's as an F/O. As he was about to upgrade to Captain at age 29 he found out he was a type 1 diabetic and had to quit flying in 2000. Now he's 49 and has a good chance to get his medical back. He lives in a rural mountainous area and just bought a house there 2 years ago. He really loved flying and wants to get back into it even if it means having to move.

What he's wanting to know is what is the best process to get proficient again, what type of aircraft, should he pay big bucks for jet sim time, etc. He didn't mention his TT or ratings yet but I assume he's got an ATP. I think at age 49, maybe 50 after the FAA process he can still have a pretty good career.

One other question I thought of is airline acceptance of a type 1 diabetic. He's going to be asked about why he quit flying so long ago and now wants to come back. I know legally they can't turn him down for that if he's holding a Class 1, but we all know how that goes.

Thanks guys, I'll relay info to him until he joins us on APC.


dera
12-05-2019, 08:35 PM
I'm trying to help out a member of a Facebook diabetic pilot group. As some of you know, a few weeks ago the FAA announced they're going to start giving Class 1 medicals to insulin dependent diabetics. A lot of hoops to jump thru, and at least a 6 month process.

I'm trying to get this guy over on our forum but in the meantime this is his situation. He flew cargo DC-8's and 727's as an F/O. As he was about to upgrade to Captain at age 29 he found out he was a type 1 diabetic and had to quit flying in 2000. Now he's 49 and has a good chance to get his medical back. He lives in a rural mountainous area and just bought a house there 2 years ago. He really loved flying and wants to get back into it even if it means having to move.

What he's wanting to know is what is the best process to get proficient again, what type of aircraft, should he pay big bucks for jet sim time, etc. He didn't mention his TT or ratings yet but I assume he's got an ATP. I think at age 49, maybe 50 after the FAA process he can still have a pretty good career.

One other question I thought of is airline acceptance of a type 1 diabetic. He's going to be asked about why he quit flying so long ago and now wants to come back. I know legally they can't turn him down for that if he's holding a Class 1, but we all know how that goes.

Thanks guys, I'll relay info to him until he joins us on APC.

Get some G1000 time first, every RJ is EFIS now. Maybe 20-30 hours in a 172 G1000 or something like that. Get your EFIS scan going. After that, go to a regional with a good training program and no forced upgrades. He would be displaced to captain immediately at some regionals and that would be a horrible idea right now.

Maybe ExpressJet on the 145? Simple jet, good training, and long-ish upgrades for now but trending lower.

sourdough44
12-06-2019, 03:21 AM
Those walking trips from Boston to LA start with the 1st steps.

He should Waltz down to the local airport, take some refresher, get a checkout & then a biannual flight review. This may take a handful of hours.

Along with that he has to get his medical squared away. I wouldnít just pick an AME off the FAA website, may need a pilots advocate AME.

There is no reason to talk jet sim time or anything expensive right now. If he were to get current & comfortable, with a medical, he could likely get a job at a reigional.


rickair7777
12-06-2019, 09:54 AM
Honesty is probably the way to go in explaining the gap in aviation. With many lapsed pilots coming back, airlines are a bit concerned about their commitment to the lifestyle.

I wouldn't go into details, just say you had a medical issue, since resolved with the FAA.

DanMarino
12-10-2019, 09:26 AM
Honesty is probably the way to go in explaining the gap in aviation. With many lapsed pilots coming back, airlines are a bit concerned about their commitment to the lifestyle.

I wouldn't go into details, just say you had a medical issue, since resolved with the FAA.

What about career changers a little later in life? Are majors/lcc/ulcc hesitant since they didnít commit at a younger age? 33 yo asking...

rickair7777
12-10-2019, 03:53 PM
What about career changers a little later in life? Are majors/lcc/ulcc hesitant since they didnít commit at a younger age? 33 yo asking...

No. Generally those who value "Career Progression" will start your counter when you first get into professional aviation.

Remotely possible you could lose points in the eyes of a few military types who were top-gun aces before age 30, or civilians who flew night cargo in icing over the Himalayas at age 19 in a light twin with one motor MELed. But that kind of special personality is less common in hiring decision makers.

At 33 you're still young-ish anyway. Most pilots understand that many folks don't have the finances or simply don't know aviation is a realistic option until a little later in life. The "I did it all before age 25" folks usually had a family member in aviation.

Wealthy middle-aged career-changers are sometimes viewed with caution, simply because sometimes it's hard for millionaire business owners to fit it in swinging gear for kids at a regional. But even that you can overcome at an interview (besides they can't overtly discriminate).

DanMarino
12-10-2019, 06:03 PM
No. Generally those who value "Career Progression" will start your counter when you first get into professional aviation.

Remotely possible you could lose points in the eyes of a few military types who were top-gun aces before age 30, or civilians who flew night cargo in icing over the Himalayas at age 19 in a light twin with one motor MELed. But that kind of special personality is less common in hiring decision makers.

At 33 you're still young-ish anyway. Most pilots understand that many folks don't have the finances or simply don't know aviation is a realistic option until a little later in life. The "I did it all before age 25" folks usually had a family member in aviation.

Wealthy middle-aged career-changers are sometimes viewed with caution, simply because sometimes it's hard for millionaire business owners to fit it in swinging gear for kids at a regional. But even that you can overcome at an interview (besides they can't overtly discriminate).

Thanks Rick!

Skylarking
12-10-2019, 06:17 PM
No. Generally those who value "Career Progression" will start your counter when you first get into professional aviation.

Remotely possible you could lose points in the eyes of a few military types who were top-gun aces before age 30, or civilians who flew night cargo in icing over the Himalayas at age 19 in a light twin with one motor MELed. But that kind of special personality is less common in hiring decision makers.

At 33 you're still young-ish anyway. Most pilots understand that many folks don't have the finances or simply don't know aviation is a realistic option until a little later in life. The "I did it all before age 25" folks usually had a family member in aviation.

Wealthy middle-aged career-changers are sometimes viewed with caution, simply because sometimes it's hard for millionaire business owners to fit it in swinging gear for kids at a regional. But even that you can overcome at an interview (besides they can't overtly discriminate).

Well said.

Iím former mil, but otherwise in a similar situation. Iím a 50 y.o. junior FO, fresh out of IOE. I had a 10 yr break in flying (had a corporate desk job between the Navy and SkyWest) and it didnít even seem like a speed bump with SkWest at the interview. Like Rick said, honesty was my best policy. I chose a corporate gig for home life reasons, but once the kids were all grown up it was time to return to my Ďnatural habitatí.

Lots of good regional options, but Iíll pitch SkyWest, since Iíve been happy with the experience working here so far. Good training dept, jets are well maintained (in my very brief experience), and an insane number of domiciles.

Feel free to pm me if you have any specific questions.