Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




View Full Version : 65-seat CRJ900


KCaviator
12-12-2019, 07:22 AM
https://mobile.twitter.com/justinbachman/status/1204886048746201088

You guys getting GoJet’ed?


pangolin
12-12-2019, 10:35 AM
https://mobile.twitter.com/justinbachman/status/1204886048746201088

You guys getting GoJet’ed?

No - it's a plan to keep flying for AA if they run up against a scope limitation and want to get more ejets. It's a hedge and a good one.

KCaviator
12-12-2019, 11:21 AM
No - it's a plan to keep flying for AA if they run up against a scope limitation and want to get more ejets. It's a hedge and a good one.

So GoJet’ed, considering this is exactly what UA did because of scope.


Sennant
12-12-2019, 11:53 AM
So GoJet’ed, considering this is exactly what UA did because of scope.

Pay's not tied to seats anymore. So what do we care about how many seats are in it?

ninerdriver
12-12-2019, 12:54 PM
So GoJet’ed, considering this is exactly what UA did because of scope.

If the planes with 65 seats require a new type, then that would be GoJet'd.

If the planes only require maintenance taking out a few seats to get to 65, then that's a lot easier.

chrisreedrules
12-13-2019, 05:03 AM
It would be a full recertification like the 550. Good news for Envoy at least!

sailingfun
12-13-2019, 05:11 AM
The problem is that when you reduce the seat count the aircraft are no longer economically viable. Management has used this playbook many times in the past. Either they get the unions to agree to putting the seats back in or the airframes quietly go away in a few years.

pangolin
12-13-2019, 04:23 PM
It would be a full recertification like the 550. Good news for Envoy at least!

No it wouldn’t need the new certification. It’ll be a long range plane.

chrisreedrules
12-15-2019, 02:18 AM
No it wouldn’t need the new certification. It’ll be a long range plane.

You do realize that anytime you change seating configurations it changes the aircraft basic operating weight and the weight and balance right? It would have to be recertified and approved by the FAA. Hence why the 700 at GoJet became the, “550”. Same plane from the pilot perspective, just different from a paperwork perspective.

Simpsons
12-15-2019, 02:29 AM
You do realize that anytime you change seating configurations it changes the aircraft basic operating weight and the weight and balance right? It would have to be recertified and approved by the FAA. Hence why the 700 at GoJet became the, “550”. Same plane from the pilot perspective, just different from a paperwork perspective.
Not exactly. At OO we’ve had a lot of 700s for American go from 70 to 65 seats. Obviously they have to change the weight and balance numbers but it doesn’t change the certification.

Dixie320
12-15-2019, 02:38 AM
It would be a full recertification like the 550. Good news for Envoy at least!

The 550 was required to have a lower MTOW to meet scope, and it was certified with a new certificate in order to make this requirement. If the 50-65 seat RJ scope at American doesn’t have a lower weight restriction, then a new type certificate won’t be required.

terks43
12-15-2019, 08:02 AM
You do realize that anytime you change seating configurations it changes the aircraft basic operating weight and the weight and balance right? It would have to be recertified and approved by the FAA. Hence why the 700 at GoJet became the, “550”. Same plane from the pilot perspective, just different from a paperwork perspective.

Not even remotely true. Our 900’s in the FAA’s eyes are actually certified for 88 seats. You don’t know what you are talking about.

NovemberBravo
12-15-2019, 10:46 AM
Not even remotely true. Our 900’s in the FAA’s eyes are actually certified for 88 seats. You don’t know what you are talking about.

Yeah those 900 have seen who knows how many configuration changes, I think we were flying 3 different configurations last time I flew a 900. The 550 is all about MTOW. We can figure this out if someone looks up the AA scope clause.

chrisreedrules
12-15-2019, 03:00 PM
The 550 was required to have a lower MTOW to meet scope, and it was certified with a new certificate in order to make this requirement. If the 50-65 seat RJ scope at American doesn’t have a lower weight restriction, then a new type certificate won’t be required.

Ahh okay that explains it!