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View Full Version : Regional to Major/LCC


skyblue7
03-01-2020, 10:55 PM
Hello, guys

I've heard that it is very hard to move from regional to major/lcc.

I know it is difficult to come up with exact numbers,
roughly what % of regional pilots would go to major/lcc before retirement in current days,
if they have non-aeronautics 4-year degree with no military pilot experience?

I'm considering for CFI, so any opinion would be helpful to me.

Thanks,


EVVovernight
03-02-2020, 02:18 AM
Hello, guys

I've heard that it is very hard to move from regional to major/lcc.

I know it is difficult to come up with exact numbers,
roughly what % of regional pilots would go to major/lcc before retirement in current days,
if they have non-aeronautics 4-year degree with no military pilot experience?

I'm considering for CFI, so any opinion would be helpful to me.

Thanks,

Not sure where you heard that. I worked for a regional and more than 50% of resignations were to LCCs. Others went to the Legacies and ACMIs

rickair7777
03-02-2020, 04:26 AM
The type of degree you have doesn't really matter, although if you have a technical degree they accept a somewhat lower GPA.

In any given year the percentage of regional pilots who go to majors can be highly variable, depending on the economy, growth, retirements.

Over the course of one's career it can also vary depending on the era. Many folks who get stuck for a while in the regionals due to timing and low opportunity (ie lost generation) decide to stay even when the hiring starts happening because they have seniority and often live somewhere that works for their family and provides easy access to their base.

I'd guess career-wise someone starting the regionals right now probably has a 70-80% shot at getting to the majors (if they want to). If I knew more about the person in question I could be more specific, a lot of the factors are already set in stone by the time you get to a regional.


skyblue7
03-02-2020, 03:59 PM
The type of degree you have doesn't really matter, although if you have a technical degree they accept a somewhat lower GPA.

In any given year the percentage of regional pilots who go to majors can be highly variable, depending on the economy, growth, retirements.

Over the course of one's career it can also vary depending on the era. Many folks who get stuck for a while in the regionals due to timing and low opportunity (ie lost generation) decide to stay even when the hiring starts happening because they have seniority and often live somewhere that works for their family and provides easy access to their base.

I'd guess career-wise someone starting the regionals right now probably has a 70-80% shot at getting to the majors (if they want to). If I knew more about the person in question I could be more specific, a lot of the factors are already set in stone by the time you get to a regional.

I was trained in US from PPL to CPL, tried to get a job in my home country, but airline market in my country is terrible right now, so I'm thinking about going for CFI and work in US, because I have a US green card.

I came to US when I was 14 and after college, I spent 10 years working in my home country as a financial analyst. One of my friends got pilot licenses in US and became a pilot, that triggered me to become a pilot.

Before the end of my career, I'd like to go back to my home country, but to do so, I need at least B737 or A320 experience. And to get that experience, I need to go to major/lcc.

Thanks for taking your time to give me an advice.

rickair7777
03-02-2020, 07:48 PM
I was trained in US from PPL to CPL, tried to get a job in my home country, but airline market in my country is terrible right now, so I'm thinking about going for CFI and work in US, because I have a US green card.

I came to US when I was 14 and after college, I spent 10 years working in my home country as a financial analyst. One of my friends got pilot licenses in US and became a pilot, that triggered me to become a pilot.

Before the end of my career, I'd like to go back to my home country, but to do so, I need at least B737 or A320 experience. And to get that experience, I need to go to major/lcc.

Thanks for taking your time to give me an advice.

Based on what you describe, your odds of getting 73 or 320 experience here are very good, assuming you do well in initial training.

If you just need a thousand hours or two in a narrowbody, there are a few places which will hire you on a 73 with very low time, with minimal or zero competition right now. Not the best jobs by any means, but you'll get your time if that's all you need.

newt192
03-03-2020, 10:50 AM
The type of degree you have doesn't really matter, although if you have a technical degree they accept a somewhat lower GPA.

In any given year the percentage of regional pilots who go to majors can be highly variable, depending on the economy, growth, retirements.

Over the course of one's career it can also vary depending on the era. Many folks who get stuck for a while in the regionals due to timing and low opportunity (ie lost generation) decide to stay even when the hiring starts happening because they have seniority and often live somewhere that works for their family and provides easy access to their base.

I'd guess career-wise someone starting the regionals right now probably has a 70-80% shot at getting to the majors (if they want to). If I knew more about the person in question I could be more specific, a lot of the factors are already set in stone by the time you get to a regional.

Would I be able to benefit from the retirement wave if I start training in a year? My goal would be a major/LCC. If it helps: college degree, no criminal record, two traffic tickets when I was 17 (no DUI anything like that), and early 20s. Thank you.

mikeinflight
03-03-2020, 11:43 AM
The type of degree you have doesn't really matter, although if you have a technical degree they accept a somewhat lower GPA.



In any given year the percentage of regional pilots who go to majors can be highly variable, depending on the economy, growth, retirements.



Over the course of one's career it can also vary depending on the era. Many folks who get stuck for a while in the regionals due to timing and low opportunity (ie lost generation) decide to stay even when the hiring starts happening because they have seniority and often live somewhere that works for their family and provides easy access to their base.



I'd guess career-wise someone starting the regionals right now probably has a 70-80% shot at getting to the majors (if they want to). If I knew more about the person in question I could be more specific, a lot of the factors are already set in stone by the time you get to a regional.



Hi Rickair777, you mention GPA. How strongly are majors looking at GPA if you get to them in your late 40s? I have always been curious about this. If they are looking, what GPAs do they look for ?


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rickair7777
03-03-2020, 01:00 PM
Hi Rickair777, you mention GPA. How strongly are majors looking at GPA if you get to them in your late 40s? I have always been curious about this. If they are looking, what GPAs do they look for ?


Most of the top tier will consider your GPA, and prefer >3.0. At least one (DL) has a strong preference for that.

Not sure your age matters for purpose of your undergrad GPA.

I do know that they don't give as much weight to post-grad GPA because most adults get very close to straight A's anyway so it doesn't differentiate anything. They feel that how you perform when young sheds some light on who you really are (the fallacy there is that many people do grow and mature after college years).

Obviously if you're an older adult you do not want marginal grades in any education endeavor... adults don't have the excuse of being young.

skyblue7
03-03-2020, 05:42 PM
Based on what you describe, your odds of getting 73 or 320 experience here are very good, assuming you do well in initial training.

If you just need a thousand hours or two in a narrowbody, there are a few places which will hire you on a 73 with very low time, with minimal or zero competition right now. Not the best jobs by any means, but you'll get your time if that's all you need.

Thanks, Rickair7777,

It sounds great and also very surprising, I didn't even think that would be possible.
I checked out airline profiles from airline pilot central and forums, Atlas air, Transair and Southern air(Cargo) seem to be the places you mentioned, but not sure.
It would be appreciated if you could give me names of the places you mentioned, if you know any.

rickair7777
03-03-2020, 09:12 PM
Thanks, Rickair7777,

It sounds great and also very surprising, I didn't even think that would be possible.
I checked out airline profiles from airline pilot central and forums, Atlas air, Transair and Southern air(Cargo) seem to be the places you mentioned, but not sure.
It would be appreciated if you could give me names of the places you mentioned, if you know any.

Southern air (cargo) and Sun Country (pax) are two that come to mind for the 737. There may others in cargo/ACMI (possibly mesa airlines?).

Don't know of any true entry-level jobs on a 320.

skyblue7
03-05-2020, 01:30 AM
Southern air (cargo) and Sun Country (pax) are two that come to mind for the 737. There may others in cargo/ACMI (possibly mesa airlines?).

Don't know of any true entry-level jobs on a 320.

Thank you very much!

skyblue7
03-05-2020, 01:31 AM
Not sure where you heard that. I worked for a regional and more than 50% of resignations were to LCCs. Others went to the Legacies and ACMIs

Thanks for the information!