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Bascuela
08-09-2007, 07:32 PM
Perhaps a silly questions, or not. From a professional standpoint, would most carriers prefer to see flight time logged not using decimals points? - Thanks


CloudPilot57
08-09-2007, 08:30 PM
huh? like 3.2 hours of flight time if it was a trip? what else would you do, 3 and 1/8 or something? I guess I don't fully understand

HercDriver130
08-09-2007, 08:56 PM
u...me..and 47 other people....


Hacker15e
08-09-2007, 09:04 PM
I've seen a rare few who log their flight time using two places after the decimal point.

Weird.

FLYBOYMATTHEW
08-09-2007, 09:44 PM
I think it's a valid question. I believe he's asking if he should use 3.2, or say, 3:12.

I use the decimal system, because that's what I had been using since my first flight lesson. The first airline I flew for had a minute-to-decimal conversion table in their GOM. It's kind of funny that after converting all of the times to decimals using their table, the decimal times were always a little bit less than the minute times after you started adding them up.

HercDriver130
08-10-2007, 02:18 AM
hum.... i understand the question now... but I dont think I know anyone who ever logged the personal book that way.

willie
08-10-2007, 03:35 AM
I believe his is asking 3.2 or just 3, right?

FlyerJosh
08-10-2007, 04:38 AM
Decimals or minutes. The professional standard is pretty much hours and tenths- ie 2.4.

Block time is logged in minutes (2:28), then converted to decimal points (2.5).

Here's a good scale to use:

0-3 minutes = .0
4-9 = .1
10-15 = .2
16-21 = .3
22-27 = .4
28-33 = .5
34-39 = .6
40-45 = .7
46-51 = .8
52-57 = .9
58-63 = 1.0

Pilot41
08-10-2007, 04:45 AM
Makes no difference, he means 3hr 10min = 3.2 vs 3:10. In most parts of the world the log hrs:min format, in the USA hrs:tenths is the norm. Airlines in the United States could care less, either way is fine, no idea about the rest of the world.

CloudPilot57
08-10-2007, 07:02 AM
ah, gotcha. I use tenths. That is how the majority of people do it

Slice
08-10-2007, 11:27 AM
There are enough math errors using decimal points. Carrying over minutes is even more prone to mistakes if you ask me.

Bascuela
08-10-2007, 05:40 PM
Decimals or minutes. The professional standard is pretty much hours and tenths- ie 2.4.

Block time is logged in minutes (2:28), then converted to decimal points (2.5).

Here's a good scale to use:

0-3 minutes = .0
4-9 = .1
10-15 = .2
16-21 = .3
22-27 = .4
28-33 = .5
34-39 = .6
40-45 = .7
46-51 = .8
52-57 = .9
58-63 = 1.0

Answers my question, thank you. The only reason I asked is because I used to work instructing for a foreign airline. We would log all their flight using block formatted as 2+15.

fr8rcaptain
08-12-2007, 11:30 AM
Perhaps a silly questions, or not. From a professional standpoint, would most carriers prefer to see flight time logged not using decimals points? - Thanks
42.2857% of civilian pilots used decimals, the other 57 43/64ths used fractions.:D

eskimopilot
08-12-2007, 03:43 PM
42.2857% of civilian pilots used decimals, the other 57 43/64ths used fractions.:D


YOU SAID IT TO THE POINT!!!

myflatsix
08-15-2007, 11:09 PM
In my crew logbook I use minutes for accuracy (30/7 issues, etc.). I convert it to decimals (tenths) when I put it in my logbook.

Reggie Dunlop
08-16-2007, 04:40 AM
The other day I flew 3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375 105820974944 5923078164 0628620899 8628034825342117067982148086513282306647

It was an odd flight. I kept going around in circles. But that to one side, I am having trouble deciding how to log it Can anyone help?

;)

ShortBusDriver
08-16-2007, 05:06 AM
Your logbook should be as easy as pie.

:-)

FlyboyPhil
08-16-2007, 11:52 AM
Were you flying a radial engine aircraft on that 3.14 flight? Do any Circle-to-land approaches?

Yak02
08-16-2007, 06:00 PM
Just lie on your application like the other 99.934% of the pilots with less than 7,000 total time did to get a flying job.

Clue32
08-17-2007, 01:33 AM
Here's a good scale to use:

0-3 minutes = .0
4-9 = .1
10-15 = .2
16-21 = .3
22-27 = .4
28-33 = .5
34-39 = .6
40-45 = .7
46-51 = .8
52-57 = .9
58-63 = 1.0


US Army Scale is a bit more generous and easier to remember.

1-6 Min = .1
7-12 min = .2
13-18 min = .3
19-24 min = .4
25-30 min = .5
31-36 min = .6
37 -42min = .7
43-48 min = .8
49-54 min = .9
55-60 min = 1.0

Then again, we don't start logging time until on the take-off roll or until the skids leave the ground.

My Jeppesen logbook is printed in the decimal format, so that is what I follow.

Led Zep
08-17-2007, 06:44 AM
I used to log it in square root format.

80ktsClamp
08-17-2007, 09:00 AM
I utilized the decimal system when I was a GA pilot doing flight instructing and corporate. When I got hired with the airlines, I converted it to hours:minutes.

I like the accuracy and the ability to crosscheck the airline's system on our online schedules.


Adding the logbook up takes a few more minutes than the simple decimals, but I think it looks sharper and is easier to track.


To add a 4+12 flight and 3+22 flight.... 4+(12/60+3+(22/60)= 7.xxxxxxxxxxx... Take that answer, subtract 7 and multiple the resulting decimal by 60 and you have your minutes. Complicated, yes. But... I'm OCD. :)

fr8rcaptain
08-20-2007, 07:22 PM
The other day I flew 3.141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375 105820974944 5923078164 0628620899 8628034825342117067982148086513282306647

It was an odd flight. I kept going around in circles. But that to one side, I am having trouble deciding how to log it Can anyone help?

;)
Why circles? Was you foot nailed to the floor while you were having that Pi fight with the clowns?:D

Split S
08-20-2007, 07:30 PM
I use the dewey decimal system...is that wrong?

Bascuela
08-20-2007, 10:10 PM
Perhaps a silly questions, or not. From a professional standpoint, would most carriers prefer to see flight time logged not using decimals points? - Thanks

Good lordy, I just got back from a 5 day, and this thread is still going. Can I pose the real hard hitting questions or what?

Radial Song
08-20-2007, 10:50 PM
we should have adopted the metric system long ago...makes so much more sense. however, one thing; are we going to change our folk sayings? i.e. "if you give a kid a centimeter, he'll take a kilometer" :D



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