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View Full Version : Washington Times - Pilot Shortage


AFPirate
08-20-2007, 04:48 AM
Airlines brace for shortage of pilots

By Bryce Baschuk
August 20, 2007
Airlines are preparing for a major shortage of pilots and are trying to hire more of them to meet the demands of the next decade.

The airline industry is looking to hire 65,000 pilots by 2012 — including 12,000 this year — but is fighting a slew of retirements, a dearth of new recruits and competition from overseas carriers and the U.S. military.

Commercial air travel has grown 8 percent in the past five years, from 683 million passengers per year in 2001 to 740 million in 2006, and the Federal Aviation Administration expects that number to jump to 1.2 billion passengers by 2020.

The industry is concerned thatthere will be a void left when the current group of pilots is forced into mandatory retirement at age 60.

"I think that between 2010 and 2020 the pilot shortage is really going to be exacerbated with those retirements," said Daniel Elwell, assistant administrator for the FAA.

To buy the industry time, the FAA is working to change its retirement policy to allow one of two pilots in a crew to fly up to the age of 65.

"Studies [have shown that] the population is healthier, older and what were [safety] concerns a long time ago really aren't concerns today," FAA Administrator Marion Blakey told The Washington Times recently.

Researchers estimate that 3,800 pilots could be added to the national supply if the retirement age were raised to 65.

But the airline industry may have bigger concerns, as many of the United States' current pilots are being wooed by foreign airlines.

"There is a worldwide shortage looming," Mr. Elwell said. "We're already seeing it in other countries. Japan can't get pilots fast enough; [neither can] carriers in the Middle East, so they are hiring American pilots."

After the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, many of the 10,000 pilots who were furloughed opted to take early-retirement packages, changed professions or sought jobs with international carriers.

Jet Airways, an airline in Bombay, is one company that has been pursuing former U.S. pilots for their experience flying wide-body airplanes.

Kit Darby, owner of Aviation Information Resources Inc., an industry research firm in Atlanta, said some Indian companies are luring U.S. pilots by offering them a tax-free salary.

"So just as the domestic demand for experienced pilots is rising, foreign airlines are poaching our pilots," Mr. Darby said. "And they are doing a pretty good job."

"This is a global industry," said Steve Lott, a spokesman from the International Air Transportation Association, a trade association in Montreal. "And the neat thing about flying commercially is that you can take that skill anywhere in the world."

Illness and absenteeism among domestic pilots are further diminishing the amount of reserve pilots, with some companies having to cancel domestic flights.

Northwest Airlines Corp. canceled 8 percent of its flights over the July 28 weekend because of its struggle to put pilots in the cockpit.

The nation's fifth-largest airline by traffic has been plagued by pilot absenteeism and sick calls that have depleted its reserve work force during the end of the past two months.

Northwest pilots fly 90 hours per month, owing to company restrictions, so sometimes the number of reserve pilots runs short at the end of the month, said Capt. Monty Montgomery, a spokesman for the Northwest Airlines Pilots Association.

"We were insufficiently staffed with pilots to fly the regular schedule," he said. "Our pilots are already flying at a very high maximum, and we are reluctant to take on extra hours that keeps us away from our families."

As a result, Northwest has cut back some of its flights, reduced the amount of flight hours to 86 a month and focused on hiring more pilots.

The company said in its second-quarter earnings statement July 31 that it had recalled all furloughed pilots and will begin hiring new pilots to increase its reserves.

Northwest is not alone. According to Aviation Information Resources Inc., domestic airlines have hired 6,000 pilots in the first half of the year and are on pace to surpass the 8,000 pilots who were hired last year.

But that could become a challenge if the next generation of pilots is unable to take the controls.

A portion of today's domestic-pilot experience is deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan and can't be hired by civilian carriers.

"What's happening with the American pilots is that the Air Force and Navy and Army pipeline is all but shut down because of the war," Mr. Elwell said.

Many prospective civilian pilots have been discouraged by the pay cuts and reduced benefit packages in the industry.

Although earnings for airline pilots are among the highest in the nation, salaries have declined in recent years.

The average annual salary for a first officer in his fifth year in 2004 was $95,000, but that fell to $87,000 in 2004 and eroded to $83,000 in 2007, according to Aviation Information Resources Inc.

To offset that, recruiters are offering steep bonuses to draw in new pilots, and some airlines are offering recruiting bonuses as high as $500 for company employees who find new pilots. (FIN)


BoilerUP
08-20-2007, 05:25 AM
5 lines about changing the retirement age from 60 to 65...only 3 lines talking about the drop in compensation...ZERO lines about the pitiful compensation at small jet carriers (especially as an FO) and ZERO lines about how quality of life has all but become a punchline to airline pilots.

But yeah, lets let the most senior pilots stay another 5 years - that's cheaper than fixing the real problem!!!

HalinTexas
08-20-2007, 05:57 AM
Lies. All lies.

How many apps are there at SWA, UAL, FL, DAL, NWA, FEDEX, Alaskan and UPS, many others? Fractionals aren't going anywhere.

None are reducing their requirements, none have improved working conditions to attract "recruits." ATA still has almost 300 on furlough. Most won't come back, and we don't have immediate plans to recall anyone.

The shortages are at the regionals/commuter/small jet. Very few want to work under those conditions. I don't blame them. Those that are there are always looking to improve their own prospects.

Raising the retirement age will only make things worse. Fewer at the smaller carriers will be leaving, but then again fewer will apply given the working conditions and the fact that the pilot will be stuck at that carrier for 5 more years. It will make things worse as pilots at the crappy carriers leave the industry for better pay.


Bucking Bar
08-20-2007, 06:12 AM
I've heard between 10,000 and 11,500 at FDX.

Outofthebox
08-20-2007, 06:20 AM
Someone should write a letter to the editor or a rebuttal to this letter and point out all the negatives. Low pay time away from home job security age 65 ect.

Airborne
08-20-2007, 06:42 AM
Lies. All lies.

Very True-



The shortages are at the regionals/commuter/small jet. Very few want to work under those conditions. I don't blame them. Those that are there are always looking to improve their own prospects.

Raising the retirement age will only make things worse. Fewer at the smaller carriers will be leaving, but then again fewer will apply given the working conditions and the fact that the pilot will be stuck at that carrier for 5 more years. It will make things worse as pilots at the crappy carriers leave the industry for better pay.

I don't think there is a pilot shortage- companies that pay well and are taking care of their pilots are not having a difficult time finding pilots.
Training cost (directly related to fuel prices) are sky rocketing causing a shortage of pilots with over 1000 tt but as far as below those times, there are more pilots than jobs out there.
But hopefully pay will get better at the regional level so the pay can either maintain or increase at the major level.
If the job at the regional level get worse I will bet the majors will follow, some already have.

kalyx522
08-20-2007, 07:08 AM
The average annual salary for a first officer in his fifth year in 2004 was $95,000, but that fell to $87,000 in 2004 and eroded to $83,000 in 2007, according to Aviation Information Resources Inc.

To offset that, recruiters are offering steep bonuses to draw in new pilots, and some airlines are offering recruiting bonuses as high as $500 for company employees who find new pilots. (FIN)

That's funny.. it seems like in the first paragraph, they must be talking about major airline FOs... no way the average for ALL FOs can be that high.. not with the thosands of us regional dudes earning only $20k. Then the second paragraph is obviously about regionals... but they don't mention that they are two different things (major/regional). Non-pilot readers would construe that as "average FO pay is 83k AND these FOs are being offered steep sign-on bonuses." Still makes us sound like spoiled brats complaining about nothing! and speaking of "steep bonuses"... $2500 is "steep?"

HalinTexas
08-20-2007, 08:51 AM
See DOL bureau of labor stats.

I've found that journalists often confuse "median" with "mean" or average.

Ottopilot
08-20-2007, 08:52 AM
"Airlines short on pilots!" ?

How about: "Airlines are cheap, so operate their airline on minimum pilot staffing to save money." Then airline cancels flights when a pilot gets sick or a cloud blows by the hub airport. :D

Cubdriver
08-20-2007, 08:54 AM
This article is rife with inaccuracy. To lump the wage statistics of regional FOs in with major FOs is highly misleading. He or she has confused the mean, median, and mode.

Example salary set-
[ $20k $20k $20k $20k $30k $40k $50k $60k $70k $80k $90k ]

The mean, or average is $45k.

The median, or midpoint of the samples is $55k.

But the mode, the most common salary is only $20k.

So, in cases where there is a nonstandardized distribution as with pilot salaries, you have a bimodal distribution (or trimodal). You cannot present an average without skewing it badly.

The article skews a bunch of things. To report there is a pilot shortage without qualifying it with the larger economic picture of supply, demand, wage, and cost is ridiculous. If the industry has artificially suppressed wages, then to claim there is a supply shortage is misleading.

Throw this article on the heap of sensationalist journalism. You would think the Washington Times could do better. Unfortunately, there is a lot of this kind of thing getting airplay lately.

skywatch
08-20-2007, 11:12 AM
This article is rife with accuracy. To lump the wage statistics of regional FOs in with major FOs is highly misleading. He or she has confused the mean, median, and mode.

Example salary set-
[ $20k $20k $20k $20k $30k $40k $50k $60k $70k $80k $90k ]

The mean, or average is $45k.

The median, or midpoint of the samples is $55k.

But the mode, the most common salary is only $20k.

So, in cases where there is a nonstandardized distribution as with pilot salaries, you have a bimodal distribution (or trimodal). You cannot present an average without skewing it badly.

The article skews a bunch of things. To report there is a pilot shortage without qualifying it with the larger economic picture of supply, demand, wage, and cost is ridiculous. If the industry has artificially suppressed wages, then to claim there is a supply shortage is misleading.

Throw this article on the heap of sensationalist journalism. You would think the Washington Times could do better. Unfortunately, there is a lot of this kind of thing getting airplay lately.

Not to be picky, but I think the median by definition has to be one of the numbers represented in the population, not an average itself...

Cubdriver
08-20-2007, 11:28 AM
That is correct; I also meant to say "rife with inaccuracy."

1Seat 1Engine
08-20-2007, 02:39 PM
There's no real reliable statistics here but the total number of FO's in the majors is a much larger group than the total FO's in the regionals. Even though there's a ton of regional carriers, they have very few pilots (comparatively) per company. Therefore the average FO salary is going to be skewed towards the larger population no matter what averaging method you use.

Before I get totally flamed, go to APC and add up the number of pilots working for majors and the number of pilots working for regionals. It's suprising how many more work for the few major companies.

Xray678
08-20-2007, 02:59 PM
Before I get totally flamed, go to APC and add up the number of pilots working for majors and the number of pilots working for regionals. It's suprising how many more work for the few major companies.


you are correct with regards to where they get their numbers for average salary.

However, IMHO, the article is still very innacurate. I don't think the salary of a major FO should be used at all in the pay they report. A new hire FO at a major airline is not an entry level position. The article implies there is a shortage of people willing to take a job as an FO making $83,000 a year. Thats not the case. The majors and nationals have plenty of applicants who want those jobs.

There is a shortage of people willing to enter this industry for $25,000 a year, and that's what needs to be reported.

RedeyeAV8r
08-20-2007, 03:19 PM
you are correct with regards to where they get their numbers for average salary.

However, IMHO, the article is still very innacurate. I don't think the salary of a major FO should be used at all in the pay they report. A new hire FO at a major airline is not an entry level position. The article implies there is a shortage of people willing to take a job as an FO making $83,000 a year. Thats not the case. The majors and nationals have plenty of applicants who want those jobs.
There is a shortage of people willing to enter this industry for $25,000 a year, and that's what needs to be reported.

There "is" a Shortage of Qualified Pilots willing to take those Jobs if you look to overseas carriers. It is going to hit the US in a few years too.
Chinese and Indian carriers can't find enough qualified Pilots to be Capts.

Xray678
08-20-2007, 03:55 PM
There "is" a Shortage of Qualified Pilots willing to take those Jobs if you look to overseas carriers. It is going to hit the US in a few years too.
Chinese and Indian carriers can't find enough qualified Pilots to be Capts.


I won't argue about overseas carriers, and I also won't argue about a shortage of qualified pilots hitting the majors in a few years. It's going to happen.

The 2-3000 pilots who have apps in at Delta are for the most part the same 2-3000 who have applied to UAL, NWA, CAL, FDX, UPS, SWA, JB, AT, etc.

There are not enough pilots to go around for the postions that will need to be filled in the U.S. in the next five years. Raising the retirement age will help, but it won't solve the problem.

BoilerUP
08-20-2007, 04:06 PM
There is no current shortage of pilots industry-wide...just at the very bottom of the industry.

Raise the compensation across the industry, and any "shortage" will go away.

TheBaron
08-20-2007, 04:39 PM
Wow! Kit Darby quoted in an article about the "pilot shortage."
Who'd a thunk. Where have I read that before. Oh yeah, all through the 90's. Somehow I have a hard time believing "experts" when their main agenda is advancing their own ability to make a buck.

chazbird
08-20-2007, 06:50 PM
The source of this story is the Washington Times, not the Washington Post - big difference. The Washington Times has a historical agenda; anti-labor, and it shows in its misleading story. The Washington Times is (or was) owned by the Rev. Sun Yun Moon, AKA leader of the "Moonies". I'm not saying a misleading (or poorly explained) story couldn't happen elsewhere, but its the Washington Times. Some research on that paper will uncover many golden nuggets of deception.

Related to the pilot "shortage": When I ask friends what they think a new hire co-pilot on regional jet makes they say, "oh, 65-80k". That is probably a good indicator what they think the pilots are worth, considering the skills and background. See how the Washington Times and other mainstream journalism lets nearly everybody down?

JoeyMeatballs
08-20-2007, 07:33 PM
The source of this story is the Washington Times, not the Washington Post - big difference. The Washington Times has a historical agenda; anti-labor, and it shows in its misleading story. The Washington Times is (or was) owned by the Rev. Sun Yun Moon, AKA leader of the "Moonies". I'm not saying a misleading (or poorly explained) story couldn't happen elsewhere, but its the Washington Times. Some research on that paper will uncover many golden nuggets of deception.

Related to the pilot "shortage": When I ask friends what they think a new hire co-pilot on regional jet makes they say, "oh, 65-80k". That is probably a good indicator what they think the pilots are worth, considering the skills and background. See how the Washington Times and other mainstream journalism lets nearly everybody down?

Well if they knew I only made 20K they probably wouldn't sleep with me :)

seaav8tor
08-20-2007, 07:48 PM
There is not now or will there ever be a shortage of pilots anywhere.

There is now and going forward will always be a lack of desire to pay pilots a salary commensurate with the level of responsibility required for the job.

As a result innocent passengers will burn and die.

The only "Bud Lite" ad pulled over protest, was pulled because it was too close to the truth.....

This is NOT funny, it's true and the truth hurts, in this case, it kills.....

http://l1011.homestead.com/DiscountPilot.html

Do not post a response unless you have knocked on a door at 2am to inform a next of kin their loved one is dead; I have.

Do not post a reply unless you have attended 10 funerals or more in 7 days; I have.

It is very sad when safety is sourced to the lowest bidder.

Spartan07
08-20-2007, 08:08 PM
Not to diverge, but I fail to see how attending more funerals entitles you to a more important opinion than the rest of us.

Yes, I have attended a lot of funerals... In fact, 13 in one day if you want to count combat zone memorial services. That doesn't make my opinion of low time pilots any more valid than yours.

But, I do in fact agree with you. I see it as a possibility that minimums will get lower and lower and then a low time new hire will become a low time captain seated next to a low time new hire and cause a massive loss of life. This, however, would most likely take an FAA rule change and for some reason I think that might be a little more unlikely than pay increases at regional airlines.

seaav8tor
08-20-2007, 08:23 PM
Ok, not intended to imply that. Poor choice on my part.

Within the next few years after the MPL has "seasoned" a bit, the ATA will start pushing the FAA for a US version. If you think we are at the bottom now just wait. In the eyes of the ATA and AIRCON, you haven't seen anything yet. :eek:

Spartan07
08-20-2007, 08:53 PM
No prob Sea :)

Yeah, I definately see the possibility of this getting out of hand. But then again, I can't predict the future, nobody can wether they like to admit it or not. I just really hope that at a certain point we as an industry get a handle on it...

Who knows, maybe with a democrat in office -MAYBE- things might get better. I'm not a Democrat but I am holding some optimism for the next administration.

Molon Labe
08-20-2007, 09:07 PM
Hello Seaav8tr,(probably not correctly spelled) I didn't get quite that many funerals in one week but in 1981 I did attend 5 of them all of which were "industrial" .And in a seperate instance I did inform at about 1 in the afternoon a significant other that she would no longer get to try to create next of or some kind of kin with the affected individual who was a friend of mine..But most importantly I did sleep in a Holiday Inn Express last night.... The Race To The Bottom is so ingrained in the essence of this country that I somehow see a situation evolving that no matter how much of a "real" pilot shortage occurs the regulations will be changed to continually lower the bar. The age 65 band-Aid is one of many the MPL the most overt, and others to come who knows what they will be, only restassured in the certainty that the regulations necessary to further cheapen the cost of crewing will come. In the event that pilots gain an upper hand an the laws of supply and demand we will be precluded by the law or the political system (ie: PEB) or other unforseen impediment from being able to exploit it. The economic power of the investment class is so great that only token gains are possible in the best of times, and in less than the best of times safety is without question the domion of the low bidder.
Also my compliments to you for that post on 10 August 2007 titled How to save $5 on an airline ticket I think that is the single most important or should I say accurate statement on the profession with regards to the state of events since 1978. My hat is off to you Sir!

SkyHigh
08-20-2007, 09:50 PM
When the day comes that I get a phone call from a major airline for an interview then we all can rejoice in the bounty of a real pilot shortage.

There is no shortage of qualified pilots only of people who are willing to work for what is currently being offered.

There is no evidence to suggest that the FAA mandated minimums of 1500 and 23 years of age for part 121 command has any connection to increased accident rates however there is plenty of evidence of complacency in older more experienced pilots and hitting the ground at a high rate of speed.

There is no pilot shortage now nor ever will be at the majors. If the regionals run low they can always make more. It only takes 6 months or less these days.

Skyhigh


"I don't smoke, drink, gamble, do drugs, or consort with women of easy virtue; I just ride motorcycles."

frozenboxhauler
08-20-2007, 10:00 PM
Not to diverge, but I fail to see how attending more funerals entitles you to a more important opinion than the rest of us.

Yes, I have attended a lot of funerals... In fact, 13 in one day if you want to count combat zone memorial services. That doesn't make my opinion of low time pilots any more valid than yours.

But, I do in fact agree with you. I see it as a possibility that minimums will get lower and lower and then a low time new hire will become a low time captain seated next to a low time new hire and cause a massive loss of life. This, however, would most likely take an FAA rule change and for some reason I think that might be a little more unlikely than pay increases at regional airlines.

Spartan,

Not to be flippant but even "high time" guys make mistakes and kill people. KLM at Tennerife and Swiss Air at Halifax come to mind immediately.

I've been told, that back in the early to mid 60's, United was hiring pilots with as little as a Private license and a promise that they would get there Comm/Inst.

I don't know that there is a simple black and white answer to this issue.
fbh

seaav8tor
08-20-2007, 11:53 PM
I don't want to bash the new guy trying to climb the ladder and I'm not going to claim the old guy should be able to fly until age 100 because he has 30,000+ accident free hours. But clearly there is a push on each end (and in the middle) on what is acceptable to fly part 121 scheduled service.

The push is driven by money.

Low time guy wants to get a return on his/her investment, earn more money... now! Understandable.

Old guy wants/needs to earn money, lost retirement, investments gone bad, life style choices, etc. Understandable.

Guys in the middle have figured out an number of ways to keep flying when they probably should find something else to do; Medical problems, substandard performance issues, alcohol and drug problems, personal problems incompatible with the grind of flying the line, but find themselves past V1 so they keep flying. Understandable.

ATA ( airlines ) recognize the larger the pool of pilots the lower number of dollars needed to find enough takers to fill the seats. Hence the desire to "promote" the illusion of a "shortage" enticing more people to take the bait and qualify for the job. Brilliant!

Problem is none of this is "Understandable" or "Brilliant" when viewed by the family members after a crash. Part 121 ops should be held to the "Highest order of safety". There is lots of "other" flying that can be done outside part 121.

Spartan07
08-21-2007, 11:20 AM
I don't know that there is a simple black and white answer to this issue.
fbh

Kind of what I was trying to get across, But probably a little more succinct :)

"Wherever you go, There you are." - Chinese Proverb

JoeyMeatballs
08-21-2007, 11:26 AM
Do you guys think many airlines (good airlines) will really want labor so cheap they they are willing to have a 200pax jet flown by a low low low time CA and a 200hr pilot with an MPL????????????? I just dont think the airlines are in the business of crashing airplanes...............................discuss

tripled
08-21-2007, 07:50 PM
I agree with SAAB,

All it will take is a tragic accident with some low time 'under-experienced' pilots at fault and that airline will be crippled. Wouldn't there be a lot of fall-out if one of the majors lost a whole aircraft of passengers due to 'pilot error'? Other companies may sense blood in the water and that will be that for even some of the biggest companies. And pilots across the board can observe such a tragedy was avoidable if only wages had been higher, making this job more attractive to the sharpest young minds in the country.

frozenboxhauler
08-21-2007, 08:05 PM
Do you guys think many airlines (good airlines) will really want labor so cheap they they are willing to have a 200pax jet flown by a low low low time CA and a 200hr pilot with an MPL????????????? I just dont think the airlines are in the business of crashing airplanes...............................discuss

I think initially, the answer from the bean counter types would be a loud "YES". I would hope that more rational thinkers in management would be a resounding "NO".

All you have to have happen are one or two accidents and then management will scramble when they are told that the company may no longer be insurable. That really would effect the bottom line.
fbh

seaav8tor
08-24-2007, 09:50 AM
Do you guys think many airlines (good airlines) will really want labor so cheap they they are willing to have a 200pax jet flown by a low low low time CA and a 200hr pilot with an MPL????????????? I just dont think the airlines are in the business of crashing airplanes...............................discuss

Follow the money.

Alteon, ( Boeing ) came up with this ( MPL ). Who will sell more aircraft and make more money when the crashes happen?

Who will have a major sales pitch to sell new next gen automated RNP, EGPWS, TCAS, Autoland, Autothrottle, Autotaxi, etc.

Boeing.


Next Gen pilots require Next Gen automation.

Oldfreightdawg
08-24-2007, 11:06 AM
First of all, I have to ask the dumb question: what is MPL?

Second, I have to agree in principle with seaav8tor. It's all about money, not safety. On the other hand, pilot compensation as a percentage of pax fares is about 5-6%, while fuel stands at 35%. If you're a manager looking at technology to save money, why would you invest in automation that repudiates pilots?

Then we have to ask ourselves as pilots, why is it that CEO's and others like them earn the obscene amounts that they do. It's not because of the highly competitive nature of the position, or the level of responsibility. In fact, if responsibility had anything to do with compensation then nurses and firefighters would earn much more, and pilots wouldn't find it as difficult to negotiate larger paychecks.

Senior management has placed themselves into a position of power, through tightly control networks and lobbying efforts, to extract their levels of pay. They take it because they can, not because some non-bias compensation committee deems it appropriate. Maybe there is a lesson there for us pilots?

IlliniPilot99
08-24-2007, 11:30 AM
i'm a low time pilot...i hit a bird once in my 172...felt real bad...then i got drunk and forgot all about it....moral of the story...i thought the budweiser ad was hilarious

Oldfreightdawg
08-24-2007, 02:00 PM
i'm a low time pilot...i hit a bird once in my 172...felt real bad...then i got drunk and forgot all about it....moral of the story...i thought the budweiser ad was hilarious

I knew a guy who hit a bird once too. It came through the winshield and took his eye and half his face off. I don't think he got drunk drunk though:D

Moral of the story: when you're a working pilot supporting a family, it's not quite as fun as it used to be.

Good luck kid

chazbird
08-24-2007, 02:01 PM
Technology such as FMS's and auto-throttles are for enhancing operational efficiency, particularly in areas where pilots cannot reasonably perform to the nth degree. Equating the desire to add automation technology because the belief that it will assist in equalizing the lower experience levels of pilots is quite misleading. Using technology proficiently - without negatively impacting other safety factors - is indeed a economic and workload bonus. The rub is getting to that proficiency level. It may now be the case that the overall experience levels currently available for new hires (or in the narrow pipeline) is going to fall short with the training and proficiency demands.

seaav8tor
08-25-2007, 01:18 PM
First of all, I have to ask the dumb question: what is MPL?

Second, I have to agree in principle with seaav8tor.


http://www.icao.int/icao/en/trivia/peltrgFAQ.htm#31

The only shortage that exists is a lack of pilots willing to work under a new paradigm of more work for less money. The MPL will be utlized by the ATA to increase total supply of pilots creating a pool big enough to enable them to meet their needs without the need to raise pay.

http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/08/23/business/pilots.php

HSLD
01-17-2008, 02:46 PM
Thread resurrected as an alternative to discussing MPL in the BA777 accident thread :)

http://www.atwonline.com/magazine/article.html?articleID=1876

MPL training video, man they're starting young! :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IVohYOQxk0



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