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View Full Version : Blunt question...


skycowboy
09-10-2007, 05:24 PM
Honestly... Do any airline pilot's (including senior pilots) love their jobs anymore? Do they hate the flying, or the managment and politics? Is there anyone left who has flown the airlines for years who is still enthused by aviation?

honestly...


HercDriver130
09-10-2007, 05:29 PM
yes......................

Zoot Suit
09-10-2007, 05:31 PM
Ask this guy.....

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118826634834410559.html?mod=travel_left_column_h s


FPG120
09-10-2007, 06:17 PM
In my 21st year. Absolutely. When I don't anymore, I will get out.

reddog25
09-10-2007, 06:26 PM
In my 21st year. Absolutely. When I don't anymore, I will get out.
In my 20th year at a major airline...and no...I don't love flying large airplanes anymore...but get me in a 4,000 lb airplane, and it's love at first sight again. Airline flying is a paycheck, don't confuse that with flying:cool:

Ottopilot
09-10-2007, 06:30 PM
After a couple thousand hours in one type, I like to change planes to keep me on my toes. I've also done the seaplane rating and will be doing the glider rating soon too. Airline flying is airline flying, and I like it, but it's not always "fun". It is always "work". I wouldn't do anything else but fly something for a living.

FPG120
09-10-2007, 06:38 PM
I guess it's what you make of it. Flying is all I remember ever wanting to do and I try and embrace the challenges of the day to day realities of it (boy does that sound like management hogwash - I can't believe I typed it....)

Plus working for a great line helps. Although I do get it about different equipment types. I've seen just about every inch of the 73....

My favorite is still the 72.

Molon Labe
09-10-2007, 07:06 PM
My favorite is the 74, however I think that we need to learn to figure out how to leave it. For example my management has rendered our working conditions so much to their liking through the 1113 process that there is very little QOL left for us. I am searching very hard and do intend to leave and to fly no more. Some times the "price" of flying is so high and the risk/reward ratio no longer justifies continuing. It takes time to plan your exit properly. An airline pilot work schedule and pay scale is really supposed to be that of the 1930's or maybe of the 1950's 1960's or 1970's not what we have now. There is also the quotient of how many times you face the "odds" and for what pay and that is where risk/reward comes in and the new market conditions simply are not adequate.

newKnow
09-10-2007, 08:11 PM
Honestly... Do any airline pilot's (including senior pilots) love their jobs anymore? Do they hate the flying, or the managment and politics? Is there anyone left who has flown the airlines for years who is still enthused by aviation?

honestly...

To be honest, there is a HUGE difference in the flying international and domestic at the airlines.

Todays domestic trips are set up the way commuter flying used to be. Which, if you like flying 4-6 legs a day with a lot of short layovers is great.

Today's international trips are more like the the way it used to be system wide (ok, they are still better).
1. Show up to the airport
2. Do some preflight planning
3. Walk to the airplane
4. Get some food to go to eat on the way
5. Preflight
6. Fly & Land
7. Slide past customs like you are a native
8. Sleep
9. Then hit the ground running in a place where people save up and plan for years to visit.
10. Sleep & wake up and do it all over again

If you like that sort of thing.

If you fly domestic, perform steps 1-6 four or five times a day.
Disregard #7
Cut #8 in half
Forget about #9
#10 is done about 18 days a month.

If you like that sort of thing.

newKnow
09-10-2007, 08:13 PM
I think what I'm saying is that Intrernational Pilots are probably enthuastic.

Domestic Pilots are just tired. :(

ewrbasedpilot
09-10-2007, 08:46 PM
Probably the best thing about flying for the airlines is the "sometimes" great crews and overnights. I love going to SXM (St Maarten), and could fly there for the rest of my career. AUA (Aruba) is another nice place to go. But the people you work with are what makes this job so fun. They can also make your life hell. But in the end, it's nice being the boss.........you seem to get just a bit more respect than the cleaners............:p

dojetdriver
09-10-2007, 09:25 PM
it's a cool job, but it can be a crappy career.

By cool job, I mean flying airplanes into fun airports. Some of the best views you will ever see. Seeing things that a 9-5 doesn't get to see, getting to work with MANY different people from all backgrounds, not just the same 5-6 office people everyday. Operating a complex machine, etc. Sometimes getting decent layovers in nice places (domestic flying).

As far as walking through the airport in my uniform, you can keep that crap. Never cared about it in the first place. Going through security 1,2, sometimes 3 times a day, NO. Short overnights (like now), NO. Having lots of bag drag because of frequent aircraft swaps and long sits, NO. Having a day scheduled for 12 hours of duty but only 5.5 hours of flying, NO. Downgrade, displacement, furlough, taking a %60 pay cut and starting all over again, NO.

CloudPilot57
09-10-2007, 09:25 PM
yes... my dad with 33 years and 23k hours still talks about how much he loves it!

WEACLRS
09-11-2007, 06:25 AM
Second career for me. Lot's of other positions including senior management, consulting, and a high flying dot com. I'm still green and new and I won't say this within ear-shot of management, but after four years of 121 flying it's by far the best job I've ever had.

scarface
09-11-2007, 06:39 AM
21 plus years and still love the flying. The other stuff wouldn't stop from flying the line because no matter what other job I took I'd still be dealing with a bunch of negatives without the huge payback of doing what I enjoy the most.

Freightpuppy
09-11-2007, 07:06 AM
I think what I'm saying is that Intrernational Pilots are probably enthuastic.

Domestic Pilots are just tired. :(

I feel more tired internationally. I think it's because of all the time zone changes.

MoonShot
09-11-2007, 08:11 AM
For me, it doesn't get any better than watching a sunset from on top.

For those few minutes I forget about all the negatives in the industry. Not many people get to see the things we do everyday when they go to work. I just couldn't bring myself to working in an office building.

You can chalk me down as one that still enjoys my job and flying in general.

newKnow
09-11-2007, 10:51 AM
I feel more tired internationally. I think it's because of all the time zone changes.

Freight,

Are you excited when you go to work though?

I remember when I fley international I would get in the seat and say, "Wow, I get to go to Amsterdam or Naritia or Singapore or London today."

Now That I'm back to the domesitc flying, when I get back in the seat, it's more like, "Wow, I can't believe I'm back at work."

I think it's a function of the days off and fatigue.

After flying a four or five day trip, it's amazing how fast 3 days off go.

av8r4aa
09-11-2007, 12:05 PM
Seems like when I was clawing and scratching for
flight hours I would do nearly anything for flight time.

Now that I have a job with a Major carrier, I will do nearly anything
to get OUT of flying!

The days off seem to be at double speed for me.

skycowboy
09-11-2007, 07:36 PM
thanks for the responses guy...

some inspirational, some down and out depressing - hate to see the latter...:(

seaav8tor
09-11-2007, 08:26 PM
thanks for the responses guy...

some inspirational, some down and out depressing - hate to see the latter...:(

If you chase and catch the job, the group you will be in will be determined by your expectations........

If your expectations are that it will all come back you are set up to be in the latter group.

If all you want to do is fly; you don't care if you are ever home; you don't care how much money you make (don't make); you don't care if you will ever be able to retire; you have no other attractive options for your future; then you will be very happy as an airline pilot.

Remember this one point. If as an old man you end up living in a single wide mobile home on your kids property thinking of how great it was to be an airline pilot, walking to the store (because you have no car) and you are happy, then this job is for you. The job is not what it was and the in the future it will not be what it is.

There are many in denial, and others that simply do not look into the future but only look back at the past.

This is not a slam it's just a simple fact on why some are happy; some will be happy and some will not.

Good luck to you.:)

AKfreighter
09-11-2007, 08:43 PM
All I want to do is fly, preferably Super Cubs and C-185's or 206's. However, I don't want to end up in a trailer on my kid's property. Trying to figure out how to make a good career out of flying the mountains. Suggestions??? Please, I'm listening...

newKnow
09-11-2007, 09:05 PM
I would think that the only way to fly those airplanes and not wind up in a trailer on your kids property that you would have to start your own company. Just a thought. But, I don't think there are a lot of "little airplane jobs" out there that pay good money.

727C47
09-11-2007, 09:21 PM
still love it

sigtauenus
09-11-2007, 09:25 PM
I'm not sure if the analogy I'm about to provide applies to airline flying or not, but in the fighter community, I've heard that flying Hornets is much like doing heroin. Once you've had a taste of the good stuff, you'll do anything to get some more of it, at the expense of your marriage, family, health, and personal life. At some time the ride will come to an end, either by your choice or with it forced upon you, and when it does come to an end, you're left with a really bad case of "withdrawal" and the task of salvaging what's left of your marriage, family...etc. I had 4 good years flying Hornets, the ride was worth the cost, but I'll be paying back my wife for many years to come for all the crap she's put up with.

Oh, and to continue the analogy further, if you are thinking about trying heroin, you get a much different answer about what its like when you ask an actual addict, or talk to his family, friends, and former addicts. Good thing flying fighters isn't on the DEA's list, eh?

Even on the worst of the worst days, when I got out of the jet kicking myself for being an idiot with the soon to follow butt-kicking in the debrief, it was still better than the best possible day for guys who don't get to fly.

I'd love to do another career flying, and as I get into it, I'll be keeping a carefull eye on QOL, and hopefully an objective assessment to see if I've simply traded heroin for crack, or got lucky enough to acquire a harmless vice. At least for the near future, I'll risk it.

I guess I took a different tact from the previous post (seaav8tor's), but the point is, flying can be lucrative, it can be fun, but there is always going to be a price to pay, even more so if it turns out to be not so lucrative or fun.

Only you can decide if you are actually having fun, if the pay is lucrative enough for you, and if the price you're paying is worth it.

HalinTexas
09-11-2007, 09:54 PM
It's a pretty good job as long as you don't have to depend on it.

Remember: Once you think you've made it to the top, be ready. It can all disappear in less than half the time it took to get there. The top lasted less than two years for me.

Those that have seen only the top with nothing bad, haven't been airline pilots for very long, or were extremely lucky (and rare.).

⌐ AV8OR WANNABE
09-11-2007, 11:24 PM
I feel more tired internationally. I think it's because of all the time zone changes.
I'm just curious if your recent "announcement" has anything to do with you being extra tired? ;)

727C47
09-12-2007, 04:06 AM
I'm not sure if the analogy I'm about to provide applies to airline flying or not, but in the fighter community, I've heard that flying Hornets is much like doing heroin. Once you've had a taste of the good stuff, you'll do anything to get some more of it, at the expense of your marriage, family, health, and personal life. At some time the ride will come to an end, either by your choice or with it forced upon you, and when it does come to an end, you're left with a really bad case of "withdrawal" and the task of salvaging what's left of your marriage, family...etc. I had 4 good years flying Hornets, the ride was worth the cost, but I'll be paying back my wife for many years to come for all the crap she's put up with.

Oh, and to continue the analogy further, if you are thinking about trying heroin, you get a much different answer about what its like when you ask an actual addict, or talk to his family, friends, and former addicts. Good thing flying fighters isn't on the DEA's list, eh?

Even on the worst of the worst days, when I got out of the jet kicking myself for being an idiot with the soon to follow butt-kicking in the debrief, it was still better than the best possible day for guys who don't get to fly.

I'd love to do another career flying, and as I get into it, I'll be keeping a carefull eye on QOL, and hopefully an objective assessment to see if I've simply traded heroin for crack, or got lucky enough to acquire a harmless vice. At least for the near future, I'll risk it.

I guess I took a different tact from the previous post (seaav8tor's), but the point is, flying can be lucrative, it can be fun, but there is always going to be a price to pay, even more so if it turns out to be not so lucrative or fun.

Only you can decide if you are actually having fun, if the pay is lucrative enough for you, and if the price you're paying is worth it.

I was the same way about round engines and tailwheels, 10 years flying DC-3s's everywhere from Boston to Bang-kok,was my crack. No regrets,just joyful memories.

de727ups
09-12-2007, 07:17 AM
"Trying to figure out how to make a good career out of flying the mountains. Suggestions???"

Alaska.

"some inspirational, some down and out depressing - hate to see the latter..."

I wouldn't disagree that the job isn't what it used to be, in a lot of cases, but who knows where it will go. In a lot of ways, it's still a great job for someone who wants to fly (imagine that)...

Even if you never made it past the middle level for your career, I don't see living in a trailer in retirement. It's just not that bad of a gig unless you never make it past regional F/O, for some reason.

There are people in life that are just never happy, want to complain all the time, and are quick to point out the negatives. Others are just the opposite.

Heck, I'm home so much that it's almost boring. But, I don't exactly jump for joy about going to work, either. You miss things. If you can't deal with that, then expect to be the unhappy.

skycowboy
09-12-2007, 10:50 AM
Yeah well, Seaav8ter's post was nauseating... crap... I love to fly. But I don't want to live in a trailer park, and neglect my wife and fam (when that venue in life rolls around)... But I love to fly...

crap crap crap...

Why did this industry have to take such a nose dive? Is there no way to reconcile this work with quality of life?

TriStar_drvr
09-12-2007, 10:58 AM
I love my wife, I love my kids, but I only like my job. And I've been fortunate enough to obtain what many consider one of the better ones in the industry. The bottom line though, its that it's still a job, and I'd rather be home or on vacation than going to work...

tomgoodman
09-12-2007, 11:07 AM
.... the job isn't what it used to be, in a lot of cases, but who knows where it will go. In a lot of ways, it's still a great job for someone who wants to fly (imagine that)...

Even if you never made it past the middle level for your career, I don't see living in a trailer in retirement. It's just not that bad of a gig unless you never make it past regional F/O, for some reason.

I agree. One reason that the average pilot income has declined is because so many low-wage jobs have been added to the profession. Many regional and LCC pilots would have had no airline job at all thirty years ago, and if they weren't hired by their late 20s, were usually considered too old. At least they now have a foot in the door, are building time, and can eventually move up. There are a lot of senior pilots who earn very good wages, and these guys will all have to retire some day, age-65 rule or not. :)

seaav8tor
09-12-2007, 11:38 PM
Tom,

With all due respect, thanks for sharing, I do appreciate your perspective and the fact that you are willing to offer advice from your career. I started in 1976; I do not doubt you started before that. I acknowledge your experience.

When I look at the trend line over the last 31 years and project it forward 30+ years I cannot help but feel I'm doing a disservice if I don't offer to a young person who has yet to invest time, money, and energy into the profession, a forward looking view.

Tom in all honesty if you had to start today and you were looking at: no A plan, declining wages in real dollars, huge cuts when adjusted for inflation, significant increases in work, significant decreases in time off, the fact that few will complete a career free from furloughs, bankruptcies, medical issues, etc. Going back to square 1 over and over. Then compare flying to a career in surgery where you could do 500K+ per year in procedures, buy an eclipse VLJ, fly when and where you want. If those were your choices, tell me Tom, would you do the whole thing again for 30 cents on the dollar and no retirement? We rationalize the whole thing by saying the industry is cyclical, but averaged out over a 30 year career it is clearly a trending down with no bottom in sight.

By the way some of the regionals are carrying nearly the same number of revenue pax (over 80% load) that the 727 did back in the day (at 50% load). With that pick the average Capt pay back in 1977 on the 727. Plug it in here:

http://146.142.4.24/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl

Now compare that number to the average CRJ hauling the same number of revenue passengers with two pilots where there were three. Many of these guys will get stuck at the commuters. This is a fact of life today and going forward.

Respectfully,

seaav8tor

jmack
09-13-2007, 06:24 AM
its a job, its a good one, but with what it takes to get here and all the hoops to jump thru, it should be and can be a great job. I don't love flying, i like it, itn nothing id do on my days off

cschmidt88
09-13-2007, 06:33 AM
This is not the job/career it was 10/15/20 years ago. Nothing is the same. Not the pay, not the layovers, not the quality of life. All that being said, I have worked many other jobs in my life and there is still nothing else I would rather do for a living. Breaking out at minnimums, sunrise/sunset on top, the northern lights, the look on a childs face when you bring them up to the cockpit for the first time... There are things that make this job very rewarding. The company/culture make all the difference for the rest of the day to day stuff though.

quimby
09-13-2007, 08:08 AM
I think what I'm saying is that Intrernational Pilots are probably enthuastic.

Domestic Pilots are just tired. :(


I disagree.

NE_Pilot
09-13-2007, 08:21 AM
Tom,

With all due respect, thanks for sharing, I do appreciate your perspective and the fact that you are willing to offer advice from your career. I started in 1976; I do not doubt you started before that. I acknowledge your experience.

When I look at the trend line over the last 31 years and project it forward 30+ years I cannot help but feel I'm doing a disservice if I don't offer to a young person who has yet to invest time, money, and energy into the profession, a forward looking view.

Tom in all honesty if you had to start today and you were looking at: no A plan, declining wages in real dollars, huge cuts when adjusted for inflation, significant increases in work, significant decreases in time off, the fact that few will complete a career free from furloughs, bankruptcies, medical issues, etc. Going back to square 1 over and over. Then compare flying to a career in surgery where you could do 500K+ per year in procedures, buy an eclipse VLJ, fly when and where you want. If those were your choices, tell me Tom, would you do the whole thing again for 30 cents on the dollar and no retirement? We rationalize the whole thing by saying the industry is cyclical, but averaged out over a 30 year career it is clearly a trending down with no bottom in sight.

By the way some of the regionals are carrying nearly the same number of revenue pax (over 80% load) that the 727 did back in the day (at 50% load). With that pick the average Capt pay back in 1977 on the 727. Plug it in here:

http://146.142.4.24/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl

Now compare that number to the average CRJ hauling the same number of revenue passengers with two pilots where there were three. Many of these guys will get stuck at the commuters. This is a fact of life today and going forward.

Respectfully,

seaav8tor

Is it really fair to compare pay during industry regulation to pay under deregulation?? The large airlines were basically guaranteed to make a profit back then, which is no longer the case today.

tomgoodman
09-13-2007, 08:39 AM
Seaav8tor,

You are quite right -- for most airline pilots, the job is not what it once was and it probably won't ever be. You do perform a service to pilot wannabees by pointing this out. But for those who really want this career, it's far more available than it once was, and many young guys forget this. You and I had many contemporaries who were qualified and eager to fly, but couldn't get a job. Most good things decline in relative value as they become more widely available.

The $500k surgeon has a wonderful job, but how many pre-med students ever get there? If I were starting over, I'm not sure what career I would choose -- probably Air Force again, and retire there -- but active-duty guys say that's not what it once was either. In some ways, it's good to be "old". :)

seaav8tor
09-13-2007, 09:12 AM
Is it really fair to compare pay during industry regulation to pay under deregulation?? The large airlines were basically guaranteed to make a profit back then, which is no longer the case today.

It's not about fairness. It's about an awareness of what it was, what it is, and where it's going.

As long as a new pilot just starting out has this understanding from the get go it may prevent much of the discontent I see as pilots in mid career are feeling like they have been duped.

It's about looking in the mirror and having an awareness of your expectations vs. reality. One size does not fit all.

If your expectations are in line then "Challenger Houston, you are go at Throttle Up".

fireman0174
09-13-2007, 03:06 PM
In some ways, it's good to be "old". :)

Except for the arthritis. :(

skycowboy
09-13-2007, 03:39 PM
Ewwwkay couple of things...

First of all:
hen compare flying to a career in surgery where you could do 500K+ per year in procedures, buy an eclipse VLJ, fly when and where you want. If those were your choices, tell me Tom, would you do the whole thing again for 30 cents on the dollar and no retirement?

Ok.... medical school and becoming a physician is absolutley not something they just hand you, I worked in surgery a couple of years before hospital politics took its toll. Medical school has gotten extremely competitive and if you don't know someone, good luck getting in. There are just as much politics involved, and by the way, the surgeon lifestyle is that far fetched from the pilots... They are up for days at a time. My father had a friend in pharmacy school who got his RPH and then hated it so he become a surgeon and was dead with in a few years - stress. Becoming a surgeon today is virtually on par with respect to quality of life. Now true they make a load of cash.

It is not arguable anymore that the job isn't what it used to be. Everyone knows that. Its stupid as well, if you want to use the surgeon analogy, that we jump through hoops and have training on par with that of a doctor, just in another sector of the world, and we are not compensated properly.

But honestly how many people end up in trailer parks?

And also this is just a question to satisfy my curiosity, if people are so dispassionate about flying now days, then why exactly do they sign up for forums like this? Why on earth would so much time be devoted to *****ing, when time off from that crappy job could be better spent doing something else, such as fishing, hiking, or spending time with the fam - whatever makes you actually happy...

SexyJeny
09-13-2007, 04:11 PM
I have been bless about my flight experiences..

I love to be in air and seeing continents on a weekly basis.

My pay check is good ( Euro pay check )I love to live in Miami, and have time to spare with my parents in Rome Italy.

See ya


SexyJeny

Lighteningspeed
09-14-2007, 05:31 AM
I have been bless about my flight experiences..

I love to be in air and seeing continents on a weekly basis.

My pay check is good ( Euro pay check )I love to live in Miami, and have time to spare with my parents in Rome Italy.

See ya


SexyJeny

Sounds like you work for a European airline. I used to go to Europe often for my last job. Italy is my favorite European country to visit.
It's good you've had no speed bumps in your lying career yet. Most of us have and let's hope the future will be a smoother one.

Skyone
09-14-2007, 05:48 AM
Seaav8tor,


If I were starting over, I'm not sure what career I would choose -- probably Air Force again, and retire there -- but active-duty guys say that's not what it once was either. In some ways, it's good to be "old". :)

Tom,
When you and I started, there was no airline option for retired military. If there had been, no doubt I would have stayed on active duty for 20, gotten out and had another 20+ years with an airline (if 65 is a reality). Thirty three years old was out of the ballpark for hiring.

And using that inflation calculator, starting pay at all of the majors today is LOWER than what we made in out first year. If you remember, in the late 70s and early 80s, monthly pay for a narrow body major captain was same as the cost of a new American made midsized can. Sure can't say that today.

seaav8tor
09-14-2007, 12:05 PM
becoming a physician is absolutley not something they just hand you,
[QUOTE]

They just hand you the left seat of a 777 to fly the world.

[QUOTE]
It is not arguable anymore that the job isn't what it used to be. Everyone knows that..............................But honestly how many people end up in trailer parks?
[QUOTE]

My perspective is over the span of 30 years. Where we were. Where we are. Considering all the forces in motion trying to estimate where you will be 30 years from now. The question is not how many people end up in trailer parks, now; The question for someone starting out, using all the forward looking information you can obtain is what is the projection going forward 30 years? It was a great ride for my Dad, it was a good ride for me, looking ahead, unless you have low expectations on the compensation side, you will be unhappy. But as I said in the first post, if the cash side and time away from home doesn't matter, you will love the job!


[QUOTE]
And also this is just a question to satisfy my curiosity, if people are so dispassionate about flying now days, then why exactly do they sign up for forums like this?

They want to give something back to the career since so much has been taken away:D

727C47
09-14-2007, 01:36 PM
You have to have the fire for this profession,that deep abiding love for lift and weight,overcoming thrust and drag,to put up with all the drama,and uncertainty. But I love it,I really,truly do.

Lighteningspeed
09-14-2007, 01:43 PM
You have to have the fire for this profession,that deep abiding love for lift and weight,overcoming thrust and drag,to put up with all the drama,and uncertainty. But I love it,I really,truly do.


Amen. I agree totally. After 9/11 I spent years in management positions shuffling papers, and I wondered if I would ever get back in the air and get paid for it. I made good salary but I was always looking for excuses to go fly. Now that I am flying professionally again, thank God, I know I am in the profession that I always knew I was supposed to be in.

Bob_Sacamano
09-14-2007, 10:43 PM
I really enjoy my job. Although the 737 is a dinosaur...

727C47
09-16-2007, 04:49 PM
I really enjoy my job. Although the 737 is a dinosaur...

same,same the 727,but she is still the sharpest looking ship up there,at least since the Concorde ceased burning Jet-A.

kouk
09-16-2007, 10:32 PM
Like most posts here, flying is what you make it and to what ends you use it.

In my case, I have a 6 figure gov flying job, home every night, nearly gauranteed a 3% cost of living pay raise each January and all the 401K and gov retirement bennies. This just happens to be my situation, after 20 years of flying for the USAF.

I have considered the people carriers, but like all of you have mentioned, the low pay and instability does not make that market attractive. Why take a pay cut and risk my family's future for a roll of the dice that I may someday possibly could be a captain, and event then, if the company goes bad, it all goes away. The freighters are still attractive, but only UPS and FedEx are worth it for me.

So, like you, I have a dilema, go to the freighters, or stay in my secure job? I can go through the plus and minus of each, but again, to what end are you flying for. I enjoy my kids, my wife:) and my community, which I am highly involved in. My goal in life is to be a good dad, hubby and community leader. My end is to choose the position that will allow me to do that. Can I do it in either position...sure...but each has it's own form of scheduling and job responsibilities. You have to choose which one you want to deal with.

I love flying, and would never want to work for a living, but I don't love it to the point of making my family suffer low pay and instability. Choose whatever your personal life will accept, because in the end, when you can no longer fly due to health, etc, your personal life better still be there, otherwise, you sold your soul for the wrong reason.

kouk
09-16-2007, 10:51 PM
One more thing,

I remember a passage from the book "Stranger to the Ground", I don't remember the exact quote, but it went like this:

...while you are airborne, you are the master of your jet and the sky, only when you touch down and shut down, do you return to the world of critisizm, responsibility and accountability...

It's a bit overstated, but flying is a drug that no other job in the world can produce. And yes, we all deal with all the #$%^ while we work on the ground, just because it will allow us to go back and do it again. The true sign of an addict.:)

JetJocF14
09-17-2007, 02:57 AM
You have to have the fire for this profession,that deep abiding love for lift and weight,overcoming thrust and drag,to put up with all the drama,and uncertainty. But I love it,I really,truly do.

AMEN BROTHER. If your in this business to only make money then your in the wrong business. You get through this business because the number one reason you want to be in it is because you love to fly.

One thing you cannot do is outspend your earning power. You can't be some smuck who works at the regional level gets to the major and go right out and buy every toy on the block and upgrade to your Capt house. Heck I still live live in the same house as when I got hired at EAL. Yes I upgraded the kitchen and put a pool in along the journey but you want a really cool feeling. Everthing I own is paid for free and clear. Cars, plane, boat n house.

Hopefully still a great ride for the next 8 or 10 years despite schedules being optimized.

Heck it was either this or become an actor/comedian.................