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View Full Version : Is this true???


LAfrequentflyer
09-18-2007, 08:57 AM
Do 20-somethings expect the world on a silver platter?

By LISA OSBURN
BIRMINGHAM, ALA. — Sporting their “princess” T-shirts and $100
sneakers, members of Generation Y grew up hearing they could conquer
the world.

Many of their parents started them on that journey with laptop
computers, vehicles, cell phones, high-speed Internet connections and
MP3 players.

But the next step of life — entering the workforce — can be a tricky
one for the babies of the 1980s and ‘90s, career experts say.

“They come in with very high expectations,” said Tim Irwin, a corporate
psychologist and author. “Their parents have told them from the moment
they were born that they were special. These Gen Y’ers believe it. The
thought of having to pay dues for a long time to get into a corner
office is kind of jarring to them.”

That sense of entitlement needs to be left at home, said Nicholas
Aretakis, a career coach specializing in college students, recent grads
and twentysomethings. He wrote No More Ramen: The 20-something’s Real
World Survival Guide.

“They don’t like having normal and meetings. They get frustrated with
getting the less glamorous assignments and more menial tasks," he said.
"Most of them are really surprised that you don't get much vacation
time."

That attitude has led some managers to start looking elsewhere. Gregory
Jones, CEO of Hubbard Systems, in Inverness, Ala., hires college
graduates from the U.S. and from India for his software development
company.

The differences between the two groups concern him.

"The students here definitely do not have the drive," Jones said. "They
have never been held to a standard. When they enter the work force,
there is surprise that deadlines must be met. They think we are going
to be an extended family. We are not. That is a very hard issue for
them to get over."

Their co-workers from India are another story, he said.

"There is a great hunger from Indian programmers," he said.

"There is a very strong desire to do well. They are very competitive."

Jones said he blames parents and a flawed educational system for
producing workers without a sense of responsibility, accountability or
commitment.

"Companies who can, like ours, will choose not to manage them and bring
in people from another country," he said. "I feel sorry for the retail
end of the country because they have to hire them."


'All about me'

Bridgett Jones Short, owner of Jucos, a beauty salon in Inverness,
falls into that category. She has been in the business 24 years and has
concerns about younger employees.

"This generation is all about 'me.' Money is not a huge problem because
it seems like parents subsidize their income," Short said. "They don't
feel like they have to work very hard. They think the grass is always
greener. It is not about dedication. If they were to get off at 6, they
get off at 6."

Parents have the ability to change that, Short said. She uses Jordan
Corley, a 20-year-old stylist, as an example of what happens when the
talent of Gen Y combines with good attitude and good upbringing.

"Jordan is the exception. She is very accommodating. She goes the extra
mile, and she has an excellent work ethic," Short said.

Corley said she is focused on her goal of starting her own business.

"Eventually I want to own my own salon," she said. "I am staying in one
place for the experience. I want to learn the business."

That's the catch of this generation. They can be extremely bright with
self-confidence and energy, said Irwin, who wrote Run With the Bulls
Without Getting Trampled.

Technology is like breathing to them, he said.

"I think they are going to be one of the most creative and productive
generations in history," Irwin said. "I am predicting great things, and
smart companies are going to be hiring the best of them."

Young workers will stay at a company if they are getting the challenges
and opportunities for growth. That is why Anthony Oni, a 27-year-old
community development specialist for Alabama Power Co., said he has had
one job since college.

But he has watched other friends switch from job to job.

"They want to build multiple experiences to move forward. They think a
broad base is important," Oni said. "Another reason they leave is
lifestyle. I have a couple of friends who moved to different places
because the city offered a different lifestyle."

His friend Brandon Wilson, 27, is on his fourth job since graduation.
He now works at O2 Ideas, a Birmingham public relations and advertising
agency.

"For the 76 million or so Gen Y'ers in the world, we are trying to find
our place in the business community. Sometimes it doesn't always happen
the first time," he said. "Young people are graduating college and
exploring and finding their niche in a community and taking advantage
of great opportunities. This may be confused with impatience."


Opportunities to advance

Jay Carr, 27, knows people his age are not always perceived as
dedicated and self-motivated. But the Alabama Power Co. engineer
believes they do have the opportunity to advance faster than previous
generations because technology allows them to process a job more
quickly. They just need to be aware that everybody graduating from
college with them will have the same resources, he said.

"I definitely think parents need to be positive and encouraging because
there is so much opportunity out there," he said. "But it still comes
down to hard work and perseverance."


Brought to you by the HoustonChronicle.com

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FlyerJosh
09-18-2007, 09:57 AM
It's not surprising to me. I'm a gen-X'er (tail end), and can see the difference between even people my age and people coming out into the work force right now.

Slice
09-18-2007, 10:49 PM
Yes and they expect an airline job without working towards it for more than 90 days.


schwanm
09-19-2007, 01:42 AM
It is true, all this has made it all the more difficult for genuine hard working gen-y people to get a job without being stereotyped as being a lazy "I want it all and I want it now" type.

SkyHigh
09-19-2007, 05:00 AM
Yes and they expect an airline job without working towards it for more than 90 days.

Seems like they are getting hired at the regionals after 90 days.

SkyHigh

FlyerJosh
09-19-2007, 05:36 AM
Seems like they are getting hired at the regionals after 90 days.

SkyHigh


Sure. Somebody could get hired on with a regional after 90 days of flight training. Provided that they trained every day for at least 2.75 hours of flying and did absolutely perfect on every lesson and didn't have any weather delays or issues scheduling aircraft/checkrides, etc.

But you show me one person that's made it zero time to hired with a US 121 regional in 90 days, and I'll buy you dinner at a nice steakhouse of your choosing.

LAfrequentflyer
09-19-2007, 05:39 AM
According to ALLATPS web page its more like 6-9 months from 0 to 121 FO.

I read in Microtrends that more Americans have filed for bankrupcies than have 4 year college degrees.

Do you guys think law school would be a good investment?

-LAFF

tomgoodman
09-19-2007, 06:46 AM
Do 20-somethings expect the world on a silver platter?

If so, it wouldn't be the first time this has happened. Unrealistic expectations usually accompany a prosperous era, as in the "Roaring '20s". The problem is self-correcting, but only through bitter experience. Many people tend to disregard "caution and warning lights", feeling that what is "unfair" just can't happen.

LAfrequentflyer
09-19-2007, 08:10 AM
I can see your point...I see a lot of my generation killing themselves w/ debt...

But thats another story...


-LAFF

rickair7777
09-19-2007, 01:16 PM
Get used to it. The boomers are just entering their retirement window, and the younger generations are less numerous. Employees will be in increasing demand, especially for anything remotely professional.

The post- 9/11 baby surge won't hit the streets for another 15+ years.

Pilotpip
09-22-2007, 06:27 PM
My generation makes me sick. How's that for a strong statement?

I've worked my tail off for everything. For the first time since I was 18 I have only one job. I used to love it in college when I heard how many people never worked a day in their life or "worked for their dad during summer vacation." Many had jobs waiting for them before they graduated. A former roomate had his father get him a job in a bank. Dad was the president of another bank and he never could tell me exactly what he did because he didn't know.

Oh yeah, those fast trackers didn't impress too much in ground school. We had 3 of 5 ATPers wash out, one from CAPT and one from DCA. Only one from a traditional training background. A couple of these guys fit right into the siver spoon mentality.

Bascuela
09-22-2007, 08:01 PM
Do 20-somethings expect the world on a silver platter?


"There is a great hunger from Indian programmers," he said.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

There is a great hunger in India, period.

planecrazyjenn
09-22-2007, 11:26 PM
During my senior year of undergraduate school, I remember one girl complaining because she would be a few credits short of graduation and that her father wouldn't continue to pay for the next semester. She didn't graduate on time because she screwed around. My parent's didn't pay JACK! And I was about to start veterinary school...which required all four years paid for up front. NOT cheap. Did I *****? No I did something about it. And unlike her, at least I know I've earned both of my degrees.

A lot, not all, kids are expecting everything to be handed to them. And I don't just blame the kids, I do partially blame the parents. They spoil their kids too much from the very beginning...we expose them to the media, which is usually pretty negative. Look at the "celebrities"...their drug use, alcohol abuse, etc. These are who our kids look up to. I was brought up in a catholic school, and I kept my own daughter in catholic school before she killed by a drunk drive. She was an angel to have around...and unlike other kids, was not a complete wild one. I exposed her at an early age to my work in the missionary field. I never forced her to do it, but she would always volunteer to help out. She became grateful for the things we had, knowing that other children were not as lucky. A true blessing in my life. Oh and might I add that the drive of the other car was an underage drunk kid who wasn't injured, and to this day shows no remorse of the fact he killed my daughter.

It's just really sad in general. It saddens me to turn on the news and listen...and how greedy people can be. They think nothing can happen to them, and everything should be handed over with no work.

Like pilotpip said, I'm ashamed of my own generation.

Diver Driver
09-23-2007, 09:35 AM
Oh and might I add that the drive of the other car was an underage drunk kid who wasn't injured, and to this day shows no remorse of the fact he killed my daughter.

It's just really sad in general. It saddens me to turn on the news and listen...and how greedy people can be. They think nothing can happen to them, and everything should be handed over with no work.

Like pilotpip said, I'm ashamed of my own generation.

Wow... I am really sorry for your loss. There is probably no experience worse in the world than losing your own child. I as well am ashamed of our generation.

daytonaflyer
09-24-2007, 04:15 AM
I was born in the last year of generation X.
One very telling name that I heard recently was that the newer generation of young adults are being not so affectionately referred to as the
"Less than best generation".

Nightsky
09-24-2007, 09:08 PM
No doubt about it, the younger generation is coming out with unrealistic expectations and is, imo, just generally messed up overall. But - I don't lay the blame entirely on them. WTF were their parents thinking?! They bred and raised these kids this way. You reap what you sow, and this is the result.

planecrazyjenn
09-25-2007, 05:52 PM
Wow... I am really sorry for your loss. There is probably no experience worse in the world than losing your own child. I as well am ashamed of our generation.

Not sure how to respond, other than thank you. It's been a rough year.


Back on topic, I was watching a show on the national geographic channel earlier about childhood development. One of the topics discussed was whether child prodigies are a result of genetics or parental intervention. For child prodigies, they have to have a will to WANT to learn. Parent's can't force a kid to do this. As I was watching this program, I couldn't help but to think about the parents who force their kids to play baseball, football, sing, act, model...or convince them that being a doctor, lawyer, politican is the only way to be well respected and that money is everything in life. Forcing someone, of any age, to do something they have little to no interest in will do nothing other than make them unhappy in life - if they don't choose to turn against you and do what they please.

It is human nature to want to be happy, and financially secure. Sure the American Dream is what...the nice little house, 2.4 kids, white picket fence and a cute puppy dog. But with the media being the way it is, most dream of things much greater. There are TV shows like cribs, and such. Who watches this kinda stuff? The generation we speak of in this thread. They see this, and what happens? They assume that because others get to live like this, that this is the one and only lifestyle...they then start dreaming of fancy cars, huge houses, etc. They see these rich spoiled kids in NY, LA and all that get what they want...and they want to be the same. It's all a huge game, and the media has a lot to do with it.

I'm hesitant to bring up another topic that's big in society right now, but that's the topic of sex. It's alllll over tv, it's alllll over songs...it's accepted, even though it's not. Kids see their favorite celebrities talking about it. Peer pressure is everything. When their friends are doing it, be it drugs, sex, alcohol...they want to do it to be 'accepted' and 'cool.'

Oh and don't get me started on smoking and drinking. People working in these stores are NOT doing their job and carding everyone. I have friends who talk about having never been carded, yet I get carded every time...as does my husband and he hasn't been 21 in over 20 years. lol. So why are we allowing 15 year olds to get a hold of alcohol? There is absolutely zero excuse for it. And if you try pulling that, well they get it at home thing...then bring me their parents so I can smack the s*it out of them for not keeping it out of reach. There is no good reason for this. Why aren't schools enforcing this in school? I remember back in H.S. kids would smoke/do drugs in the bathroom in between and during classes. Where are the staff during this? It really only takes one walk around the school to realize what the heck is going on...and you can't tell me the smell of drugs is normal.

So to sum up my rant, yes the kids are ultimately responsible for their behavior...but don't you think the adult population has a little bit to do with this as well?

PCJ

JMT21
09-28-2007, 01:12 PM
From Wikipedia -

Generation X is generally marked by its lack of optimism for the future, nihilism, cynicism, skepticism, alienation and mistrust in traditional values and institutions. During the early 1990s, the media portrayed Generation X as a group of flannel-wearing, alienated, overeducated, underachieving slackers with body piercings, who drank franchise-store coffee and had to work at McJobs, concepts that had some truth to them but were in many cases stereotypes.

Gen-X thinking has significant overtones of cynicism against things held dear to the previous generation, mainly the Baby Boomers.

Sound familiar?

Every generation seems to get labeled as lazy, dumb, etc. by the previous. I don't understand those who say they are ashamed of their generation; don't let a few unsavory characters ruin your perspective of the group as a whole. For better or worse, things are changing and people hate change.

ILS37R
09-28-2007, 03:21 PM
I think the reality check for the current generation is especially difficult, as well, due to the changes in the American business climate over the years.

I'm a child of 1980. When I went to college--with a scholarship, mind you--I was still paying 10k out-of-pocket for tuition. When my mother went to college, she spent ~$120 on books and fees per semester. My father was able to finance not only his college, but also his living expenses for the year by working at the dairy or on road crews during the three months of summer.

When my parents got out of college, they were able to immediately step into good jobs. When I got out of college, after months of searching I had to take a job at a call center. A disturbing number of the people there had degrees. A half-dozen of my college friends ended up there, too, because nothing else was available.

I have friends who graduated with honors working at minimum +$.50. Even with the recent hike, minimum wage is not what it used to be in terms of spending power. Not to mention, of course, that many entry-level jobs these days offer limited (and expensive) benefits, if any.

For every entitled jerk out there driving the BMW their daddy bought for them, there are dozens of good, hardworking kids who have and are paying their dues and still can't get ahead.

But there's another level here: some people have earned the right to feel a little entitled.

Shouldn't someone who's worked their way through college at least be able to get a job with benefits and enough pay to see a movie once in a while? Some may expect the corner office, but most of the people I know are just looking for something that covers their college loan payments.

A little entitlement is good. It is, after all, the voice that tells you the QOL and responsibilities that come along with being a pilot entitles you to more than, say, Skybus wages. A healthy amount of entitlement--or self-worth, if you prefer--is what staves off a race to the bottom.

While I don't doubt the veracity of the anecdotes in the article, they're certainly not representative of my experience. Hard work should pay off. That's the American Dream, right? Work hard and make a better life for yourself. For a many, hard work is not getting the things to which it should entitle.

Don't let bad apples obscure the real issue.

Freightpuppy
09-28-2007, 06:30 PM
So to sum up my rant, yes the kids are ultimately responsible for their behavior...but don't you think the adult population has a little bit to do with this as well?

PCJ

First off, I am truly sorry for your loss....I can only imagine how it's been for you.

I agree with pretty much everything you say on this thread.

What always kills me is how some parents CONSTANTLY defend their kids like they can do no wrong. My friend is a teacher and says it's so hard because parents get mad at you for saying anything remotely bad about their kids. It's like parents are in la la land. What does this show kids?

The other thing that I don't get is giving your kids EVERYTHING! Then they become spoiled little brats. I always shake my head around Christmas when you hear a news story about two moms fighting over a Tickle Me Elmo doll or something. It's nuts!

planecrazyjenn
09-29-2007, 04:31 AM
Don't let bad apples obscure the real issue.

Your right, the problem is that there aren't just a few bad apples. While there are a lot of good people doing the right thing that remain out of the publics eye - working hard, etc. - there are wayyyy too many who aren't...and that's not limited to our own generations. This is one of the few topics where I really do believe that the bad outnumbers the good.

Frieight...thank you. Also...what's with that tickle me elmo doll?? Never had one but that thing always scared me to be honest. lol.

schwanm
10-11-2007, 04:51 AM
We didn't start the fire...

crewdawg
10-28-2007, 08:08 PM
I agree with most of what you all have said but also disagree with other things. Obviously it's ultimately up to the child how they act but I also lay the blame on the parents.

Parents need to lead by example not just give them "the talk." Although my fathers talk was more than enough for me. "Son, if you do drugs or smoke, I'll kick your a$$. If you drink, be smart, and if you drive I'll kick your a$$. If you get her pregnant I'm not paying a thing and you can kiss your dream of becoming an Air Force pilot goodbye, any questions?" That was more than enough for me because I respected my parents and my biggest fear, was and still is, disappointing my parents. I am who I am today because my parents cared enough to take the time to raise us kids right.

As far as peer pressure, I call bull ****, I never did a thing I didn't want to do, whether it was cool or not. If your friends are "true" friends then they will accept you and move on, if not you need move on, there are plenty of other people out there (from a kid who graduated with 37 kids). I chose not to drink or smoke in high school, did I get crap for it? Sure but I'm not about to let my friends define who I am! If there is one thing I will pass on to my children when I have them this would be it. Most of those "cool" kids from high school can be found in the same place years later. Still doing the same thing they were doing in high school, probably still talking about high school because those were the best years of their life.

As far as kids not working, I don't think they should work all that much in high school. I was lucky my dad didn't want me working at all during high school. He worked a factory job on the night shift his junior and senior years and says he missed alot of growing up. He didn't want me to make that same mistake. I just worked the summers on the farms because I hated asking for money. But I believe they should work for what they get, especially during college. Kids that work for the things tend to appreciate them more.

As far as the parents not accepting what the teachers are saying about their child, I agree that is a huge problem. Parents need to realize that their children are not the little angels they see, all the time. Think back to your childhood and the crap that you pulled. It's part of growing up, but hold them accountable for their actions.

As far as the media, again...I call bull. Growing up in the 90's we were more exposed to that crap more than most. Again if you let stuff like that define who you are, I think you have some serious soul searching to do.

This all from young naive eyes, I know I still have alot of growing up to do but this is what I have learned so far.

PLTwnab
10-31-2007, 06:51 PM
During my senior year of undergraduate school, I remember one girl complaining because she would be a few credits short of graduation and that her father wouldn't continue to pay for the next semester. She didn't graduate on time because she screwed around. My parent's didn't pay JACK! And I was about to start veterinary school...which required all four years paid for up front. NOT cheap. Did I *****? No I did something about it. And unlike her, at least I know I've earned both of my degrees.

A lot, not all, kids are expecting everything to be handed to them. And I don't just blame the kids, I do partially blame the parents. They spoil their kids too much from the very beginning...we expose them to the media, which is usually pretty negative. Look at the "celebrities"...their drug use, alcohol abuse, etc. These are who our kids look up to. I was brought up in a catholic school, and I kept my own daughter in catholic school before she killed by a drunk drive. She was an angel to have around...and unlike other kids, was not a complete wild one. I exposed her at an early age to my work in the missionary field. I never forced her to do it, but she would always volunteer to help out. She became grateful for the things we had, knowing that other children were not as lucky. A true blessing in my life. Oh and might I add that the drive of the other car was an underage drunk kid who wasn't injured, and to this day shows no remorse of the fact he killed my daughter.

It's just really sad in general. It saddens me to turn on the news and listen...and how greedy people can be. They think nothing can happen to them, and everything should be handed over with no work.

Like pilotpip said, I'm ashamed of my own generation.



I totally agree with you...I'm 21 and I was telling a friend that if she stayed at my college, it would be way cheaper than going to an art school. And my college HAS an art program!!! But she said that her parents are paying for it, so she doesn't care...I felt bad for her parents. I mean, I'll admit, my parents pay for a lot of my college, but I at least try to go as easy on their wallets as possible, and treat their money as my own. It's ridiculous how much some of the parents of my generation babied their kids. My boyfriend doesn't have to pay his cell bill or his car insurance bill, and his parents paid $8,000 dollars toward his car. He hasn't had to spend a dime in his life, and therefore wastes all of his money and my money because he thinks it grows on trees. He can never wait a few months to see a movie. He always has to see it at midnight when it comes out, even if it's in the "luxury" movie theater. Same with video games. Always gotta be the newest thing....it's just frustrating....
and school doesn't help either. I don't know of a whole lot of fellow college students who are capable of paying a bill, because all the practical knowledge isn't regarded as important to anyone but special ed students.

Btw, sorry to hear about your daughter. You raised her right and it's a shame that idiots like that kill off the few good people in existence.

N0315
11-01-2007, 03:21 PM
Offensive. I fall in this group and I guess working as a mig welder all night then flying and taking classes is quite an easy way, full with gold fork on my silver platter. I work with a lot of older people that have no dirve. Every gen has these type of people. The older gens think your generation is lame and pathetic. My grandfather grew up in the depression and, even having over 1 mil saved, still thinks people should work 7 days a week and eat milk mush so they can save for 20 years of retirement. Most of you would disagree. Truth of the matter is there ARE people like that, of all ages. I see A LOT of people in their 30's spending 30 grand on ATP and other training centers, if they do that its ok. If a younger person does that, you're calling them everything in the book and saying they just want it quick, must be the "y" gereration.

planecrazyjenn
11-02-2007, 08:06 AM
It's not that they want the ratings done quick, heck I did accelerated flight training...it's those that thing everything should be handed to them on a silver platter. And if you pitched out the money for a 90 day program, and pay it back? Then your certainly not in that catagory. Receiving a scholarship takes hard work, it's not given to just anyone. Work hard and you shall receive. This is just a lucky time for people to make the break into the airlines, whether I agree a 250TT pilot should be in the cockpit is a different story. But if they get in, more power to them. But, there are those who give off that attitude that well since it's that time in the industry cycle again I should automatically get hired...and when they don't they complain that they'll have to instruct or what not forgetting that just a short time ago it was all but required to find a way to get 1000+ hours before you were even eligible let alone competitive at some places. Life just isn't that simple all the time, and there are mountains that get in the way. It's just up to you as to whether they remain mountains or you turn them into hills.

PLT, there's nothing wrong with the fact your parents put money into your education. As a parent, I'd do the same thing for my child...especially with the soaring prices of tuition. What I would not do is pay every single penny. Making them determine a budget, and start paying for things on their own is a pretty important life event. But, some parents elect to do that...and that's their right I suppose.

Crew, I also call B.S. on most of that stuff...but while you or I did not allow anyone to peer pressure us into doing something somebody else wanted, there are others who would. Whether it comes down to doing something just to be considered popular, or to make a team...people will do crazy things to be accepted. Is it right? No. Does it happen? Of course. Hell I was too busy skipping school to go flying to worry about such nonsense. (which doesn't fly as well in the principals office :-D )

A lot of it all comes down to having good common sense, which seems to be heading to h*ll in a handbasket rather quickly. Sure your going to see these attitudes in all generations, just like you have the good and bad in anything. I'm not one to slam down and judge someone personally, because I'm far from perfect, but while it's something that is and has always been in all generations - it's something I'm starting to see more often now in the younger generation.

JMT21
11-02-2007, 01:19 PM
Anyone with as bad an attitude as you describe is not going to make it far in life anyway, so why even worry about? The best revenge is living well.

Joeshmoe
11-10-2007, 08:29 AM
Bottom line is accountability. Not only did these kids grow up with parents who let them get away with murder, but it seems nobody is willing to step up once they are released to the world to straighten these kids out. In our litigious society stepping up often results in lawsuits based on someone's ego being hurt.
I mean look at these 20 something kids (pilots) walking around airports with their top button undone, hair spiked to the moon, iPod on, sunglasses on with a bookbag on their bag....I mean COME ON....that is totally inappropriate for what they are doing yet nobody steps up to say thats its not because who knows the consequences. Is it any wonder though that they are months out of college and still look like they are walking around campus? Just one example to illustrate the point............