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View Full Version : Coming back!!


1morguy
12-04-2007, 07:46 AM
Hey guys,
I'm coming back to flying after being furloghed from a regional (RJ 200's). How hard do you guys think it'd be go thru training for an MD80?? I know for a fact I'll study my a$$ off and sims won't be easy.... Any more survival tips??


Eric Stratton
12-04-2007, 07:51 AM
find a frasca sim to shake off the rust if your worried about the sim

8out
12-04-2007, 08:38 AM
Piece of cake. I sat as an engineer for 5 yrs. before I went up front to the window seat again. Like riding a bike, your body does not forget.


767pilot
12-04-2007, 09:04 AM
you got furloughed from an RJ operator that now got MD-80s or you got a new job?

1morguy
12-04-2007, 09:19 AM
you got furloughed from an RJ operator that now got MD-80s or you got a new job?
Former company is no longer around, I might start flying the MD. Any tips??

767pilot
12-04-2007, 09:26 AM
not really but it sounds exciting, Have fun with it and don't worry.

Koolaidman
12-04-2007, 01:33 PM
Going to Allegiant?

FliFast
12-04-2007, 02:17 PM
1morguy,

Hopefully, you're next post will be telling us that you're in ground school.

I flew the MD80 for a few months before furlough. The -80 is a fairly simple airplane systems-wise, in fact, some of the systems and design are kinda weird. The tail basically flies itself thats why when taxiing behind it sometimes it looks like the tail is split. There are other peculiarities (sp?) that I'm sure you'll find different. The first day of class ask why there are two mirrors on the glareshield...lol.

With that said, the -80 is a "fly by cable" airplane and flies fairly easily. During eng-out manuevers the centerline thrust makes this one of the easiest twin jets to fly on one engine.

With that said, and I hope those on the m.b. with a ton more experience than I will chime in, I'll list some of the things that are noteworthy.

These were the observations I made on the -80s I flew at TWA/American. If you'll excuse my run-on sentence, I'll list them:

Brakes are grabby, the APUs had a hard time cooling in the Summer, the wing is very small and climbing above 33,000 is usually reserved for near empty weights, the landing technique usually involves pushing the nose over as opposed to a conventional flare, the airplane cruises comfortably at Mach .75-.78, the airplane climbs well till approx 25,000 then after that its' climb perfomance slows down; if you're a tall person, wear a helmut when getting into the cockpit it's a low ceiling, prior to the wing heater blankets-the wings would make ice, and finally, the altitude selector's we used required the non-flying pilot to pull the altitude selector after dialing in the altitude...oddly enough sometimes the altitude did not capture.

I don't want to come across as being anti-MD80, it's not a bad plane. But if you know all the gotcha's beforehand it might help you breeze thru class.

Good Luck,

FF

jedinein
12-04-2007, 02:27 PM
The first day of class ask why there are two mirrors on the glareshield...lol.

I asked that while a ramp rat and never got an answer from any of the crew, except for one guy that said it was to see the compass. So, is that the answer, and if so, where is the compass? :confused:

FliFast
12-04-2007, 02:32 PM
I used the mirrors to look at female passengers. :)

The compass is above and behind the First Officer's right shoulder and the mirors are used to see it.

CL65driver
12-04-2007, 02:38 PM
The compass is above and behind the First Officer's right shoulder and the mirors are used to see it.

That's weird... what's the story behind that design? :confused:

Deez340
12-04-2007, 03:24 PM
That's weird... what's the story behind that design? :confused:

Again, Boeing builds airplanes, Douglas builds character.:D After checking out on over 7 different airliners and dozens of other aircraft I won't say the maddog is difficult to fly or learn, but it certainly is the easiest to screw up. It has a way of requiring a fair amount of your attention and punishing you harshly when you don't comply.

1morguy
12-04-2007, 03:25 PM
Going to Allegiant?
God Willing...yes Sir. I'm very excited about these people and having the possibility to tuck my little one in bed almost every night?....priceless!!
I'd let you know how it goes on the 11th....

Deez340
12-04-2007, 03:32 PM
God Willing...yes Sir. I'm very excited about these people and having the possibility to tuck my little one in bed almost every night?....priceless!!
I'd let you know how it goes on the 11th....

Good luck. I have so ex American/TWA friends over there and they love being home almost every night. Very tempting if you live in the area.

7576FO
12-04-2007, 03:38 PM
1morguy,

Hopefully, you're next post will be telling us that you're in ground school.

I flew the MD80 for a few months before furlough. The -80 is a fairly simple airplane systems-wise, in fact, some of the systems and design are kinda weird. The tail basically flies itself thats why when taxiing behind it sometimes it looks like the tail is split. There are other peculiarities (sp?) that I'm sure you'll find different. The first day of class ask why there are two mirrors on the glareshield...lol.

With that said, the -80 is a "fly by cable" airplane and flies fairly easily. During eng-out manuevers the centerline thrust makes this one of the easiest twin jets to fly on one engine.

With that said, and I hope those on the m.b. with a ton more experience than I will chime in, I'll list some of the things that are noteworthy.

These were the observations I made on the -80s I flew at TWA/American. If you'll excuse my run-on sentence, I'll list them:

Brakes are grabby, the APUs had a hard time cooling in the Summer, the wing is very small and climbing above 33,000 is usually reserved for near empty weights, the landing technique usually involves pushing the nose over as opposed to a conventional flare, the airplane cruises comfortably at Mach .75-.78, the airplane climbs well till approx 25,000 then after that its' climb perfomance slows down; if you're a tall person, wear a helmut when getting into the cockpit it's a low ceiling, prior to the wing heater blankets-the wings would make ice, and finally, the altitude slector's we used required the non-flying pilot to pull the altitude selector after dialing in the altitude...oddly enough sometimes the altitude did not capture.

I don't want to come across as being anti-MD80, it's not a bad plane. But if you know all the gotcha's beforehand it might help you breeze thru class.

Good Luck,

FF


Great summary Flifast!

Someone in a later thread asked why the mirrors. I was told it started with the DC8 and the Electrically (on the 80- they use Nuclear Fusion to heat-they get HOT really hot) heated windows caused variation with the Mag (whiskey compass) so they relocated the Mag compass to the front of the coat closet and the mirrors are to align sight to find the compass.
The extra thick windows on the S80 create a very quiet cockpit.
And that is all nice that I can remember. I did enjoy my time on the 80. But I will not go back.
That saying, once you go Boeing for me is true. I've flown the 72's 73's and the 75/76 they are all louder in the cockpit than the S80.
Having flown Boeings into SNA is easy. When I flew the 80 into SNA, the brakes would start chattering and my pucker factor was at 9 every time. Meaning will I get it stopped?

1morguy
12-04-2007, 03:42 PM
Does anybody know of a good software out there for the MD80 Systems? Kind of like AvSoft Computer Based Training stuff. Boy I sound like if I had the job already :)

FliFast
12-04-2007, 07:35 PM
7576,

You're right the -80 was the quietest airliner I've flown.

One caveat about buying computer based training DVDs before class is that the systems covered on the disk and the actual systems on Allegiant's jets may be different. So if I may offer, wait until Day 1 of class. The instructors, the pilots in classes ahead of you, and the line pilots will steer you towards the right resources. In the case of my training at TWA, most recommended showing up at Happy Hour at Schooners...hmmm, no wonder I never learned the airplane that well...:D:D



Back to Allegiant, a fair amount of ex-TWA-ers are there...say "Hi" for me.

7576FO
12-05-2007, 04:26 AM
i went through Vegas a couple months ago and wow there were a bunch of Allegiants there.
I didn't realize they were that big. Is it because National went out of business?

FliFast
12-05-2007, 05:18 AM
7576,

And also TransMeridian (Vacation Express/ Funjet Vacations). Correct me if I'm wrong, but Allegiant specializes in flying to second-tier cities. i.e Sanford, FL; St Pete, FL; Toledo, OH, (as opposed to Orlando, Tampa, Detroit) flying under the radar of the legacy carriers. Seems to work well for them.

hangaber
12-05-2007, 06:01 AM
Congrats on the new job. I hope you enjoy it and it treats you well.

1morguy
12-05-2007, 10:20 AM
Congrats on the new job. I hope you enjoy it and it treats you well.
I haven't gotten it yet! but I like the way you assume I did. That's the mind set I'm going with on my interview......