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View Full Version : Flying in Canada


Clue32
11-11-2009, 08:23 AM
Is anyone familiar with the requirements to fly for a Canadian carrier? Mainly looking to see if they accept FAA ATP's and medicals or if there is a conversion requirement.


BLott4
11-11-2009, 10:02 AM
There is a way to convert your ATP to an ATPL, look at Welcome Page | Page d'accueil (http://www.tc.gc.ca), should give you info. The short version is that you need to pass the writtens (there's two) and they are not easy, like down here in the US. There is no flight test for an ATPL, so the writtens cover for an oral. You'll need a canadian medical and need to keep your FAA current, because that will be the basis for your conversion. The biggest obstacle you'll run into is that no one hires in Canada without the right to work, so you will need to be a landed immigrant or a citizen. I live in Canada and work in the US (I'm a dual), so PM me if you need more details.
BLott4

supersix-4
11-12-2009, 05:21 AM
I got my Canadian ATPL in April. I had to get a medical, take a written test (basically a differences test/ instrument knowledge) and show them many documents proving I passed my PC and type ride(that covers the practical). If you have numerous types they will charge you $30 each to have them included on your certificate.
MOT will not accept a US medical, you must have one yes, but you will need to go to a Canadian DR. for a Canadian 1st class.
Of course as previosly Noted, you need to have the legal right to work in Canada.


KingAirPIC
11-29-2009, 07:31 AM
What did you use for study material for the differences exam?

CANAM
11-29-2009, 10:18 AM
Unfortunetely there are no Gleim type publications up here. There are some weekend courses I've seen advertised, but they're costly. In short, buy and read the Canadian AIM. Read it several times!! The test, while short is pretty hard. Some of the regualtions and questions on the test are pretty difficult. My first question was, "what are the two colours of a glideslope?"

ophir
12-01-2009, 07:15 AM
Some of the regualtions and questions on the test are pretty difficult. My first question was, "what are the two colours of a glideslope?"

I have to ask. What is it they are looking for in this question? The colors of the PAPI or VASI?

freezingflyboy
12-04-2009, 03:01 PM
I have to ask. What is it they are looking for in this question? The colors of the PAPI or VASI?

I believe glideslopes used to be described as having a blue and yellow lobe and the LOC/GS display in the cockpit actually had blue and yellow on it. I used to use the same analogy when teaching instrument and CFII students, the idea being to "make the perfect green" ie. being on the glide. I haven't seen a ILS receiver with the blue and yellow on it in years though.

aafurloughee
12-18-2009, 01:04 PM
What did you use for study material for the differences exam?


back then Djan Aggrey wrote several books and would be pretty close to the exam. Canada doesn't have the freedom of info act. thus no doc pubs. good luck

guardherkdriver
01-24-2011, 08:19 AM
There is a way to convert your ATP to an ATPL, look at Welcome Page | Page d'accueil (http://www.tc.gc.ca), should give you info. The short version is that you need to pass the writtens (there's two) and they are not easy, like down here in the US. There is no flight test for an ATPL, so the writtens cover for an oral. You'll need a canadian medical and need to keep your FAA current, because that will be the basis for your conversion. The biggest obstacle you'll run into is that no one hires in Canada without the right to work, so you will need to be a landed immigrant or a citizen. I live in Canada and work in the US (I'm a dual), so PM me if you need more details.
BLott4
I've done some looking on the website regarding the permanent resident status. Got a few questions for you. If you get a permanent resident status in Canada does this in anyway effect US citizenship or residency in the US? Also, how easy or difficult has it been for you to commute back and forth from Canada/US? I got easy access to O'Hare so I figured it shouldn't be too hard to get a flight from there into a domicile. Any info and tips would be appreciated.

BLott4
01-24-2011, 01:46 PM
Both countries allow even dual citizenship, I've added my Canadian citizenship now. Commuting is no problem, I drive across, because of my current employment. You just have to pick one when you enter the US, obviously, you want to pick US as you are entering to work. I know you can't PM yet, but send me an e-mail to [email protected] as I can discuss any particulars. If you are where I think you are, I have a lot of suggestions. In short, you shouldn't have any problems.

Frozen Ronin
01-24-2011, 09:04 PM
Unfortunetely there are no Gleim type publications up here. There are some weekend courses I've seen advertised, but they're costly. In short, buy and read the Canadian AIM. Read it several times!! The test, while short is pretty hard. Some of the regualtions and questions on the test are pretty difficult. My first question was, "what are the two colours of a glideslope?"

It's always good to study. I do recall buying a study guide, though. That was years ago, it wasn't fancy but it covered alot. I found it in a local pilot shop where I was in Vancouver.

Z_Pilot
01-25-2011, 05:04 AM
It's always good to study. I do recall buying a study guide, though. That was years ago, it wasn't fancy but it covered alot. I found it in a local pilot shop where I was in Vancouver.

Do you recall which pilot shop?

jakers11
01-30-2011, 05:48 AM
probably aviation world. they have loads of study guides and its the only place I know of in Vancouver, well. Richmond

CANAM
02-03-2011, 05:23 PM
If it helps anybody, they just opened an Aviation World in Chicago. Not too far away from ORD. It's a great place for resources (their website it good too).
As far as study material is concerned, I would read the Canadian AIM and know it in and out. That's what I used.