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View Full Version : CLT Mech serious injuries AirBus


tennesseeflyboy
02-16-2010, 10:20 AM
Was told that about three weeks ago, a mech at CLT was working on AirBus (don't know which one) and he had started up APU as part of his checks, he exited out the Avionics Bay service door and then went up the crew ladder to enter the aircraft, when he tried to open the entry door, the handle popped into his face and threw him down the stairs, the door opened with such force that the aircraft was "dented" on the outside skin (?) and it is believed that the aircraft must have "pressurized" when he closed up the avioncis bay door, again this happened about 3 weeks ago and I have seen nothing published via company regarding the incident in the way of FSR or other communications.


K4FE
02-16-2010, 12:11 PM
Remember some years back when a flight attendant, I think it was American, got yanked out of an Airbus door when he was opening it while the airplane still had some differential pressure? He died from his injuries.

BooyaOhYeah
02-16-2010, 05:49 PM
Hard to believe that actually happened nearly 10 years ago. But here's a review...

Safety Board Calls for Emergency Exit Door Redesign | Air Safety Week | Find Articles at BNET (http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0UBT/is_32_16/ai_90503141/)

I remember thinking...WOW.


LivingInMEM
02-16-2010, 08:30 PM
I did the research when I was teaching at the schoolhouse and found out that all of the victims were blown out of the aircraft vs pulled out by the handle. I tried my best to contradict the "hold this handle, vs that handle to not get pulled out" mantra, but I still get that same brief every time I jumpseat on the bus. If the door blows, you're going out regardless of what handle you are holding, or whether or not you are even holding a handle. Save yourself and glance at the cabin press before you even get out of the seat.

K4FE
02-17-2010, 04:25 AM
Nonetheless, being on the outside when the door blows is a bad place to be.
I hope the mech recovers fully.

Aquapilot
02-17-2010, 04:46 AM
Similar thing happened with Mesa in ORD CRJ 200.

External AC was hooked up to the Aircraft at the gate, no APU

Captain asks for External AC to be disconected and a few moments later tells FA to close main cabin door.

Aircraft instantly pressurizes, Cap tells FA to open survice door and see if external air is disconnected......oops :eek:

Door opens with such force that it yanked the FA though the doorway and out onto the ramp. She tore ligaments and severely injured her shoulder. Thank God the CRJ is only about a 5 foot drop to the ground.

Unknown Rider
02-17-2010, 05:01 AM
I did the research when I was teaching at the schoolhouse and found out that all of the victims were blown out of the aircraft vs pulled out by the handle. I tried my best to contradict the "hold this handle, vs that handle to not get pulled out" mantra, but I still get that same brief every time I jumpseat on the bus. If the door blows, you're going out regardless of what handle you are holding, or whether or not you are even holding a handle. Save yourself and glance at the cabin press before you even get out of the seat.

Isn't it briefed that way because the door has its own nitrogen pressurization system that blows the door out to allow for the slide to deploy? That brief assumes the aircraft is depressurized when the door is opened.

Overnitefr8
02-17-2010, 11:05 AM
Isn't it briefed that way because the door has its own nitrogen pressurization system that blows the door out to allow for the slide to deploy? That brief assumes the aircraft is depressurized when the door is opened.

That's the reason I always understood for giving that briefing.

FDX28
02-17-2010, 11:42 AM
The Bus also has a light on the door that warns if the plane is not depressurized.

cvilltn
02-17-2010, 02:24 PM
Was told that about three weeks ago, a mech at CLT was working on AirBus (don't know which one) and he had started up APU as part of his checks, he exited out the Avionics Bay service door and then went up the crew ladder to enter the aircraft, when he tried to open the entry door, the handle popped into his face and threw him down the stairs, the door opened with such force that the aircraft was "dented" on the outside skin (?) and it is believed that the aircraft must have "pressurized" when he closed up the avioncis bay door, again this happened about 3 weeks ago and I have seen nothing published via company regarding the incident in the way of FSR or other communications.

I asked at the ramp this morning and was told he recently returned to work.
I got the about the same details as you wrote, except that he was thrown over the top rail of the stairs and landed on the middle landing.

tennesseeflyboy
02-18-2010, 06:12 PM
OK, so where is the dadgum SAFETY REPORT ??? What are they trying to hide ??? Maybe someone needs to bring this one up at the next Recurrent Training Class when SAFETY becomes the all purpose answer

cbcfly
02-19-2010, 10:08 AM
I flew a jet in there a day or two after it happened. Then when I flew back to Memphis I had the mechs on board returning home. It was nasty. Huge crinkle on the skin. They had an awful time getting a new door to fit the hinges just to get it ready to ferry. Gonna require a pretty major repair. I also heard that the guy got knocked down to the second deck of the stairs. Not sure why there was no safety report. Interesting...

FedExBusBoy
02-19-2010, 10:22 AM
Nothing to see here.......please disperse

YouTube - Nothing to see here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSjK2Oqrgic)

HazCan
02-19-2010, 10:31 AM
YouTube - Animal House - All Is Well! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDAmPIq29ro)

The Walrus
02-19-2010, 10:56 AM
I flew a jet in there a day or two after it happened. Then when I flew back to Memphis I had the mechs on board returning home. It was nasty. Huge crinkle on the skin. They had an awful time getting a new door to fit the hinges just to get it ready to ferry. Gonna require a pretty major repair. I also heard that the guy got knocked down to the second deck of the stairs. Not sure why there was no safety report. Interesting...
What was the tail number?

tennesseeflyboy
02-19-2010, 04:56 PM
CBCBLY, just curious ...............Do you know how the plane was allowed to fly in that condition ? Did they E.A. the jet to get it back to MEM or was there some kind of CDL to address it ? We should know what is going on here.

767pilot
02-19-2010, 05:26 PM
except that he was thrown over the top rail of the stairs and landed on the middle landing.

You guys are lucky that you have a middle landing. We have an OSHA approved ladder with handrails:mad:

757upspilot
02-19-2010, 05:31 PM
You guys are lucky that you have a middle landing. We have an OSHA approved ladder with handrails:mad:except when they hook a tug to it and jerk it out from underneath you:mad:

MX727
02-20-2010, 07:59 AM
OK, so where is the dadgum SAFETY REPORT ??? What are they trying to hide ??? Maybe someone needs to bring this one up at the next Recurrent Training Class when SAFETY becomes the all purpose answer

1) Unless the mechanic or ramp filed one, it probably isn't in the system

2) Those reports you read aren't posted the minute someone files it. They are investigated then posted with the findings.

tennesseeflyboy
02-20-2010, 06:26 PM
Understood ................ I got word today from mechanic that the plane is not supposed to pressurize unless one of the infamous relays, of which the AirBus is plagued in design, happens to fault. I also understand that the aircraft in question was a model with four outflow valves, of which one side had been faulted (?) Whatever the case, we need to know what is going on with this kind of stuff and not kept in the dark. If this is a design flaw and it poses a safety risk to anyone around the aircraft, you would think there has to be some accountability in getting it reported and put out to the crewforce and others around these aircraft ..............................

strfyr51
02-21-2010, 11:01 AM
CBCBLY, just curious ...............Do you know how the plane was allowed to fly in that condition ? Did they E.A. the jet to get it back to MEM or was there some kind of CDL to address it ? We should know what is going on here.
************************************************** *****
the MEL, CDL rules are not required on a maint ferry flight to repair damage.
the Entry door is not on ANY CDL or MEL list anyway. What would be required is that the door close and Latch and not present a hazard in flying. If the acft didn't pressurize properly the flight could be flown unpressurized. I would suspect the FAA would be issuing this type of ferry document if that was the case as a Type 3 ferry. A "major League serious" ferry. I've never even SEEN Type 3 ferry Paperwork at United. We would be fixing it in place to the extent that we could issue a Type 2 ferry document. (if any at all.) Even the EWR A319(gear up) didn't require a Ferry permit.
And test flew good out of the box.

tennesseeflyboy
02-21-2010, 05:13 PM
Good information ! We still don't know any more information other than what has been posted here .................... And we may never know.

strfyr51
02-22-2010, 01:28 PM
can't speak for any other airframe but in the maint manual when running the Air cond packs the main entry door is to be unlocked or otherwise unecured when the flight deck isn't manned and air conditioning is operating. Can't elieve that the samecaution isn't part of EVERY Airbus operatir's manua as well as the Boeing 777 or any OTHER airframe with "Zero Clearance" doors. i.e. Non Boeing type Plug doors.

captfred
02-22-2010, 01:38 PM
They also had a pilot that seriously wounded a Airbus when he shot it(approx April 2008).



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