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phoenix
10-29-2006, 02:58 PM
Please forgive me if my terms are incorrect, I'm in a slow moving ground school and just trying to figure this out. I have a ASA CP-1 Plotter. I don't understand why the "heading plotter" appears be backwards. The degrees seem to decrease in the clocwise direction, as opposed to increasing. I've asked another pilot about why it doesn't increase and he couldn't give me an answer. If anyone could please offer an explanation, it would be greatly appreciated!!

:confused:


fludy12
10-30-2006, 04:27 AM
Well, sometimes you take bearing readings FROM and sometimes TO a reference point, station, etc...

FlaZoomie
10-30-2006, 04:56 AM
Is it upside down?


phoenix
10-30-2006, 03:19 PM
No seriously, pull your plotter out, and take a look at it. I understand the logic of to and from. However, this doesn't make sense to me. Typically, ten degrees to the right would be either 10degrees or 190degrees (on the to&fro concept) but, if you read it 10degrees to the right on the CP-1...from a 360 or 180 heading, it reads 350 0r 170. I'm sure I'm missing something, either that or my not so stable ex who gave it to me, is trying to drive me nuts.

mistarose
10-30-2006, 04:07 PM
Whatever heading "makes sense" is the right one, keep it simple. If you are flying from Mexico to Canada, and the plotter says either 180 or 360, 360 is the only possible answer. Hope this helps. :eek:

phoenix
10-30-2006, 04:26 PM
Could somebody please pull out their plotter?!?!?!?!?!

phoenix
10-30-2006, 04:31 PM
Is it upside down?


R U serious?!?!? Haha!!! I hope you were trying to be funny!! Either that, or you just insulted me:eek: I think you were trying to be funny:rolleyes:

TonyC
10-30-2006, 07:11 PM
Lay your CP-1 on a chart, and align the center of the circle and the center number along a line of longitude (one that goes from North to South). The bottom edge of the plotter now lies along a line that runs East to West (true), or 090/270 degrees.


Rotate the plotter 10 degrees to the right (clockwise). The bottom edge now runs along a line that is 100/280 degrees. What number appears on the top index?



You can do the same thing along lines of latitude (East/West), but that method is less accurate due to the fact that such lines are not straight, they're curved. When you use them, the numbers on the index will center around 360/180.


Does that help?




.

phoenix
10-31-2006, 03:36 AM
Yes it does. I'm away from my charts, so I'm still a little confused. However, the concept makes sense. Thank You!!

fludy12
10-31-2006, 05:07 AM
Figure out how to use a basic plotter or get a better ground school and/or a new CFI.

ClutchCargo
10-31-2006, 05:13 AM
Lay your CP-1 on a chart, and align the center of the circle and the center number along a line of longitude (one that goes from North to South). The bottom edge of the plotter now lies along a line that runs East to West (true), or 090/270 degrees.


Rotate the plotter 10 degrees to the right (clockwise). The bottom edge now runs along a line that is 100/280 degrees. What number appears on the top index?



You can do the same thing along lines of latitude (East/West), but that method is less accurate due to the fact that such lines are not straight, they're curved. When you use them, the numbers on the index will center around 360/180.


Does that help?




.


Tony:

Your ARE the Man! I've been away from primary flight training for so long that I was wondering if they even taught that basic navigation anymore. I figured they just gave 'em an electronic E6-B and told them to punch the identifier into the RNAV and they would get there eventually.:D

When I was first hired at FDX they still required us to carry a wiz wheel. Heck, when I went to college they made us carry slide rules! Do they even still make those things?

TonyC
10-31-2006, 06:57 AM
Heck, when I went to college they made us carry slide rules! Do they even still make those things?



I don't know if they make 'em any more, but I have two. The last time one came out of my drawer was when one of my kids wanted to accessorize to dress up for "Nerd Day" -- part of "Spirit Week" in high school. He came home complaining that nobody knew what it was. :eek:




I can't remember the last time I touched a plotter. :(






.

phoenix
10-31-2006, 02:52 PM
Figure out how to use a basic plotter or get a better ground school and/or a new CFI.


My CFI is an FAA Examiner. I think he's pretty well qualified to teach the material. I was simply trying to get a head start on my studies. ;)

cub pilot
10-31-2006, 04:51 PM
In the mid 60's General Aviation Manufacturers ran out of the old Barrel type DG's from WW II (believe they had H J Heinz imprinted on the face plate) and went to the new vertical card DG. You had to turn away from the heading to arrive at a new heading on the old Barrel type DG. Try flying the old Barrel type DG and you will realize how lucky we are today.

Also in the late 60's: Aero Commander, Beech, Cessna, and Piper went with the "T group" 6 pack instrument panel and attitude instrument flying was much easier to teach.

Cub