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View Full Version : Is the MEI worth it?


mistarose
11-02-2006, 06:55 PM
I have my CFII, and will graduate from my university's aviation program Winter 08. I will have an oppurtunity to earn my MEI early next year, yet the FBO I work at in the summers do not have a Multi-engine aircraft. I am looking at a Horizon Interview real soon after graduation.

My question is, would earning the MEI be worth the time and money if I never used the actual rating before getting hired by Horizon?


RedGuy
11-02-2006, 09:59 PM
Will it be worth it financially? Probably not, but you could use it simply as a personal advancement, or in a couple years to renew your CFI ticket. I finally let my CFI laps last year, but I'm thinking about getting my MEI to renew it. All I should have to do is alittle brushing up on the books and the ride, since I already far exceed the mins. So I'd imagin I should be able to do it under $500, maybe.

QCappy
11-03-2006, 12:06 AM
I have my CFII, and will graduate from my university's aviation program Winter 08. I will have an oppurtunity to earn my MEI early next year, yet the FBO I work at in the summers do not have a Multi-engine aircraft. I am looking at a Horizon Interview real soon after graduation.

My question is, would earning the MEI be worth the time and money if I never used the actual rating before getting hired by Horizon?

From my experience....no. I never got one and got hired at Horizon. If you need it to build ME time, then it would be worth it....unless you seriously don't ever plan to use it.


Laxrox43
11-03-2006, 07:01 AM
Mista,

If you look at it like this...it is one more credential that separates you from the rest. Another thing, it will help you to be more intimate with Multi-Engine concepts - if you follow me.

I have had my MEI since March of this year, and I didn't start using it until about 2 months ago. So what if your flight school might not have a twin, but if you putts around your airport and bump into people that own a twin...it can be a beautiful thing ;)

Also, you may not have to purchase Multi time...IT WILL SAVE YOU A BUTTLOAD OF MONEY!

I guess if you want to look into the future, when you are a Captain...and you have an FNG sitting right next to you, you will be able to sympathize with him/her a little bit better - hehehe.

I know these are a lot of scattered thoughts, but I am just saying whatever comes to my mind...I hope this helps you out Bud...

Good luck, and let us know what you decide...

Lax

mike734
11-03-2006, 07:36 AM
Do it unless you have a much more important need for the money. It should only take about 6 hours of dual to get the rating. You will learn a lot and it will build your confidence. You will not sweat V1 cuts in the future.

mistarose
11-03-2006, 06:45 PM
Thank everyone for your input, I'll look into it. Would it be wise to start the MEI right after I get my multi since I am used to the airplane and all the manuevers (they are all fresh in my head). Or should I got out and share some time with another pilot building time to get more experience? Don't you have to have at least 15 PIC time in a multi-engine plane to be a MEI? I always forget how that works, I'll pull out the FARs and take a look. Thanks again.

WhiteH2O
11-03-2006, 09:33 PM
You have to have 15 hours PIC to get an MEI. I would try do get it done as soon as you can so that you don't have to re learn everything. There is nothing that says that you have to do the commercial add-on in the left seat, you could start in the right, but being an instructor already, you can probably go back and forth without too much problems.

RedGuy
11-04-2006, 11:48 AM
And you have to have 5hrs PIC in each plane your going to teach in.

Laxrox43
11-04-2006, 03:35 PM
Mista,

Get that PIC, and like you said, do the MEI while the maneuvers are fresh in your head. There is only one additional maneuver called the "Drag Demo"...which is a brainless maneuver - it's cake bud.

To be honest...I thought my MEI ride was fun more than anything ;)

What are you doing yours in? Let us know what kind...just in case you need any good rules of thumb...

Lax

mike734
11-04-2006, 05:44 PM
Just remember:

Dead foot=Dead engine. Identify, verify, feather.

There. Your done.

Oh yeah. Something about Vmc, Blueline and assorted other stuff.

But really MEI training was fun. I even got a few multi students after I got rated. There is nothing quite as cool as going up in the twin with someone else paying the bill.

WhiteH2O
11-04-2006, 08:19 PM
What are you doing yours in? Let us know what kind...just in case you need any good rules of thumb...

Is that offer good for other people as well? I will be doing mine in a 1971 Seneca in a month or so. I have 40 hours in it already, and know the plane fairly well, but I would never turn down a chance to learn something!

Laxrox43
11-04-2006, 08:52 PM
Is it a straight Seneca I? I have quite a bit of time in a Seneca II. What kind of q's do you have?

Lax

ToiletDuck
11-05-2006, 07:47 AM
It's been awhile since I've messed with multi training. Can someone spit the acronyms out to me. CDWFLOP and CASTBOW right? I can't remember which one means what though lol.

I haven't flown a piston twin since I've graduated. Only a turbine and the Full, Full, Full, flaps up, gear up, identify, verify, fix or feather doesn't seem to be as much of a rush. However I only have about 35hrs twin turbin at the moment.

Laxrox43
11-05-2006, 10:01 AM
CASTBOW are the conditions that the Feds use to determine Vmc. CDWFLOP...Never heard that one - anyone care to enlighten us :p

Lax

ToiletDuck
11-05-2006, 03:57 PM
If CASTBOW is how the fed defines Vmc then CDWFLOP would be how the manufacturer calculates it. I knew the acronyms but not which stood for which. Let me take a stab at it.

Critical engine windmilling
DG ball half out
Weight max gross
Flaps up???
Landing gear down(keel affect)
Operating engine full power?
Prop feathered

I could be completely wrong. But I think I'm close.

Laxrox43
11-05-2006, 05:33 PM
CASTBOW

Critical engine, prop windmilling
Aft CG
STP
Take-off config. (flaps/gear up)
Ball split, bank 5 degrees into operating engine
Operating engine @ Max continuous
Weight most unfavorable - Max. Gross

That's the one that I teach...

Lax

RedGuy
11-05-2006, 05:56 PM
It's been a few years, but I could have swore it was gear down. Not that it really matters because in reallity you'll pull the gear up unless your already down hill ready to land.

Laxrox43
11-05-2006, 05:58 PM
You don't want the gear to be down, because the gear door's provide a "keel effect" - kind of like the keel on a sail boat. It makes the ship more stable to have the keel all the way out - likewise with the gear hanging out.

They want to test the airplane in its most unstable configuration. That's all...

Lax

ToiletDuck
11-05-2006, 07:44 PM
Yea the gear is down on mine i think. Makes it more stable.

Laxrox43
11-06-2006, 06:03 AM
That's wierd? :p

rickair7777
11-06-2006, 07:24 AM
Generally it is calculated/determined with the gear up, as this is less favorable froma stability point of view (typical twin). The gear being up is obviously a performance benefit, but Vmc is all about yaw stability. not performance.

3664shaken
11-06-2006, 12:41 PM
Just a few comments

For a light twin engine a/c (under 6000 lbs with reciprocating engines)

The T in CASTBOW is Takeoff configuration
1. Flaps set to normal T/O position
2. Trim set for takeoff
3. Cowl flaps open
4. Gear up

For a/c over 6000 lbs Vmc must also be demonstrated in the landing configuration

1. Trimmed for approach with engines operating at Vref power that gives an approach gradient equal to steepest used in the landing distance demonstration FAR 23.75
2. Flaps in landing position
3. Landing gear extended

FAR 23.149

Also gear and its stabilizing effect does have some controversy about it and appears to be very airplane specific. In Australia they teach that gear has a negative effect on stability because once the plane is slipping through the air the gear (keels) will cause a greater yawing moment that the rudder must overcome.

Large gear doors forward of CG (nose gear) would exacerbate this negative quality. While gear doors aft of CG would help stabilize the a/c.

The less mentioned item about gear and its ability to stabilize the a/c is that it slightly lowers CG which will have a positive stabilizing effect.