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View Full Version : Best corporate jet type rating?


BlackRocket
11-09-2012, 04:18 PM
What is the best corporate jet type rating for someone looking to work on a contract basis; (day to day). Looking for most common airframe so easy to get work, but at same time max pay per day. Have over 12,000 hours international time.

Thanks!


galaxy flyer
11-09-2012, 04:52 PM
With zero time on the type, none of them are good. Especially when looking at $50k plus for the rating.

GF

DHC2floater
11-09-2012, 05:22 PM
50k plus?? What type is that? I always thought B200 training is good to have. You can find places to get good and inexpensive training all over the country. It really depends on what part of the country you live in and what type of flying you want to do. I'd start by going to the local airports and see what planes are parked. Citation types are cheap to come by and you can get $500-$700 a day (at least in florida)


galaxy flyer
11-09-2012, 05:44 PM
At least in my world, the demand is for GLEX/G550 size planes for international work, as the OP stated. In that class, there is pretty constant work for experienced guys. Those ratings are $50K, minimum.

GF

billythekid
11-10-2012, 08:46 AM
Without time in type and a good network of people, a Global/G550 type isn't quite as valuable. To get customers quicker, maybe go out the your local airport, count the number of Citations/Lears/Hawkers and go with the higher number...Payoff would happen 5 times faster probably--plus you'd be building a name for yourself--and then those operaters may be upgrading... Most of the contract guys work a 1/4 of the year to just pay their recurrent costs...not even including startup/initial costs.

UCLAbruins
11-10-2012, 09:25 AM
Obviously the best type-ratings to have would be the heavy jets (G-450/V/550, Globals, 7X, BBJ). Those birds definetly pay the most.. the problem with these heavy aircraft is that it will be very difficult to find contract work or get on with a flight department with 0 time... they're gonna want you to have considerable international experience... You could be asked to fly into a small airport in Nigeria or Russia in the middle of the night, they're not going to send you there with zero time in the airplane. So they look for guys with extensive int'l time and time in the plane

I'd say the Citation X, CL604/605 or Falcon 2000 give you the best chance at landing a corporate job or finding contract work. and even though those airplanes do go overseas, I don't think they're going to demand you have int'l experience.

my 2 cents

BoilerUP
11-10-2012, 09:36 AM
Have over 12,000 hours international time.

How much of that 12,000hrs is in business jets?

As others have said, without time in type and/or a regular client already lined up you'd likely be wasting tens of thousands of dollars.

UCLAbruins
11-10-2012, 10:13 AM
As others have said, without time in type and/or a regular client already lined up you'd likely be wasting tens of thousands of dollars.

Several commuter-airline guys did that, they "charged" their way through Flight Safety's doors.. A couple of guys got lucky, I assume most did not

One guy flies a CL604 for a fortune 100 company. it worked out for him very nicely, I ran into him last week in London. He's having a good time

But I don't think I would do that, huge gumble, if it doesn't work out, you'd be paying those credit cards for a looooooong time

FrontSeat
11-10-2012, 12:42 PM
Have over 12,000 hours international time.

If that is 12,000 hours of droning over the north pacific or going to Europe with CPDLC/ADS for a 121 company it means almost nothing.

12,000 hours of doing an NDB approach after NDB holding in non radar and you are the dispatcher, amongst other hats you wear, and have the CEO of a billion dollar company onboard into some crap airport in Nigeria, or central America,,, now maybe you got something there.....

Beaver Hunter
11-10-2012, 02:48 PM
Oh, boy. How many times have I heard that before. We need some skill that you don't have on paper. I have done a very large variety of flying throughout the world. Never had a any trouble yet. Going on 23 years now.
Please save the fluff.

Hawker Driver
11-10-2012, 02:59 PM
Contacts are big. "Fly contract" is probably the most utilized website for finding contract pilots. It would probably be a good idea to contact some of those fellows and see how business is going for them; be it a Gulfstream, Global, Lear, Hawker or whatever.

Contract is truely a feast or famine gig. It also sucks when you've already committed to that day trip next week only to have to forgo that 12 day South American tour.

Red Forman
11-10-2012, 05:24 PM
The best type rating to get is one that someone else pays for.

pokey9554
11-10-2012, 07:10 PM
I was that 121 guy nobody would hire for whatever reason. To answer your question, I think the CE-500 type is valuable. It covers a bunch of airplanes, and you'll most likely meet insurance requirements for PIC.

UCLAbruins
11-11-2012, 04:01 AM
Oh, boy. How many times have I heard that before. We need some skill that you don't have on paper. I have done a very large variety of flying throughout the world. Never had a any trouble yet. Going on 23 years now.
Please save the fluff.

Correct you started 23 years ago, when things were booming. Now I suppose you have several type-ratings and a good amount of int'l Experience?

Is not that easy anymore, I promise you. We have some members of this forum who fly light bizjets, commuter airliners, etc. For some their goal is to fly long-range bizjets, I bet they don't see things as positive as you do....

Climbto450
11-12-2012, 05:12 AM
The best type rating to get is one that someone else pays for.
I second that!!!

BlackRocket
11-13-2012, 07:00 AM
Thanks for all the great info... Have a 737-800 type with considerable time, is that good for the BBJ? Also, have Beech King Air B-200 time.

Thanks again!

flyboycpa
12-09-2012, 06:24 PM
Thanks for all the great info... Have a 737-800 type with considerable time, is that good for the BBJ? Also, have Beech King Air B-200 time.

Thanks again!

Your best bet would be to seek out BBJ-work. Your B737 type will cover you for all variants of the 737 (-100 through -900ER). I have a friend that was recently furloughed from a low-cost 737 charter operator. He was typed, with quite a bit of Int'l time. He was picked up fairly quickly doing BBJ work for some royalty group over in the desert. He gets positive-space travel to/from, serves a month-on/month-off schedule, and it paid quite nicely.

I'm a former charter-then-fractional-then-corporate-then-airline guy. Corporate operators normally don't give a rat's a$$ about a 121 guy's experience (or lack thereof). The impression is that 121 guys have never had to make many decisions (flight planning, fuel loading, loading bags, briefing pax, cleaning the crapper, etc.) and have a hard time adjusting to corporate pilot requirements. PLEASE UNDERSTAND...this is not a personal slam at you...only my experience based on years of seeing it firsthand. Many 121 folks have come up through the ranks and know exactly how to do all the above and be a team player. If that's you, then you have to make sure your potential corporate operators understand that.

my $.02

pitch mode
01-13-2013, 09:26 AM
I second that!!!

I THIRD that. Let's all go out and get a 50K+ loan for the type rating to fly Mr Wealthy's jet :rolleyes:! Apparently, there are plenty of Falcon 7X drivers on the streets answereing thoses "must be typed,current with 500+ hrs. PIC in Type" job listings. Sooner or later, type rated applicants will thin out and the owner/operator will have to pay for training. If you front your own cash for this, it will be later/never. For the record, I like keeping as much of my money as possible:D!

Maxspeed
01-13-2013, 12:03 PM
The best ones are paid for by your company!

gold
02-19-2013, 11:35 AM
A friend of mine is flying a CJ part 91 as a co-pilot. He has the SIC rating and about 100 SIC hours in type. He is thinking about paying for his PIC type and was asking for my opinion. I normally would say it's a bad idea but his situation is a little different. He has very little job security and the plane he is flying might be getting sold. He has around 1500 hours and a couple hundred multi. Simcom told him he could do their short course and upgrade the SIC type to a PIC for 11K. What do y'all think about this? I told him to go for it, but it would be a total gamble if the ROI would pay off.

GlobalEx
02-19-2013, 12:30 PM
A friend of mine is flying a CJ part 91 as a co-pilot. He has the SIC rating and about 100 SIC hours in type. He is thinking about paying for his PIC type and was asking for my opinion. I normally would say it's a bad idea but his situation is a little different. He has very little job security and the plane he is flying might be getting sold. He has around 1500 hours and a couple hundred multi. Simcom told him he could do their short course and upgrade the SIC type to a PIC for 11K. What do y'all think about this? I told him to go for it, but it would be a total gamble if the ROI would pay off.
What is the reason he is wanting the PIC type? With the SIC rating and 100 hours of time I think that he would be as valuable to a company with a CJ as a guy who is typed, use the SIC and time to get a job and let the company pay for the type..
Just my opinion.

gold
02-20-2013, 03:00 PM
What is the reason he is wanting the PIC type? With the SIC rating and 100 hours of time I think that he would be as valuable to a company with a CJ as a guy who is typed, use the SIC and time to get a job and let the company pay for the type..
Just my opinion.

Thanks for the advice, I'll pass it along to my friend. He wants the PIC type to appear more attractive on his resume and help obtain a better job in the future. The SIC type is only good for twelve months. He is also planning on paying for his ATP. I would estimate that would range from around two and a half to four thousand. The PIC type would include the ATP, so the type itself would then only cost around eight grand depending on how you look at it.

I told my friend he should persuade his flight department into typing him, considering the good price being offered at simcom. I would also like to know if anyone has experience with simcom and how they compare to FSI or CAE?

I've heard of some companies that will only hire guys that have trained at FSI or CAE...

GlobalEx
02-20-2013, 05:07 PM
How is his sic type only good for 12 months?

gbagli
02-24-2013, 03:44 PM
Going back to the original thread and having more than 10 years in corporate aviation I think asking what's the "Best corporate jet type rating" is pretty vague. I hold a GV (450/550/GV) type rating but I am not really happy with my job, I have more than 1,000 hours on the plane too, but to tell you the truth unless I switch to a G that doesn't keep me away from home like the one I fly now, I'll be happy with flying a citation or a hawker. It just depends on what are you looking for. Of course the "best" would be like they say here: GLEX/GV's/GIV's but certainly money isn't everything and certainly not all Gulfstream/GLEX jobs pay what they should. But it all comes down to what you are looking for.

UnderOveur
08-20-2013, 07:36 PM
bumping an interesting thread (to me, anyway)



anyone have experience with simcom and how they compare to FSI or CAE?




Also...


Going back to the original thread and asking what's the "Best corporate jet type rating" it all comes down to what you are looking for.

How about this for criteria, in order of importance:

1) employer demand, today and in the future
2) widest range of job options (read: operations) to choose from
3) best pay

(Note: I don't include QOL on this, as QOL means different things to different people. Some folks want to be home every night, others place less importance on that vs. other considerations. I used the criteria I think the most folks would all agree on. Please add any I may have missed that you feel should be listed. Also, feel free to differ, but please explain why.) Thanks, in advance, to those in the know for your time and input!

GrummanCT
08-22-2013, 01:28 PM
I was very unimpressed with Simcom (TBM8), and it hasn't been a consideration since. Don't see myself training there in the future unless it's the only choice.

As for the best type rating? A type that is still in production is always a plus. There is no real answer to this question, whatever is going to get you work. You don't have to be flying an airplane thats name starts with a G to make stupid money. A buddy of mine has made $15k plus contracting on a CJ3 over the past two months, for very little flying.

BoilerUP
08-22-2013, 01:31 PM
A buddy of mine has made $15k plus contracting on a CJ3 over the past two months, for very little flying.

What's his day rate?

Hawker Driver
08-23-2013, 07:21 AM
Is a current production type better? Maybe. Not sure though.

GrummanCT
08-23-2013, 04:14 PM
What's his day rate?

$850"ish" I believe.

Believe it or not, i've been able to get $1,000/day on CJ3. NYC/East Coast.

Yoda2
08-23-2013, 08:11 PM
There's still a fair amount of Lear 35 action. You could run a King Air around for a while. That would place you in a better position to network, Etc.