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N4185Q
08-05-2013, 08:06 AM
I need to get an Apostille on the last page of my logbook for a foreign airline and their conversion process. The problem is that The US Dept. of State will not apostille my logbooks without a state apostille first. New York Dept. of State will only apostille public documents signed by a state official. I know I'm not the first American to fly for this airline down in Panama so it must have been done before. Have any ideas?


8hourrule
08-05-2013, 09:13 AM
Our office admin could do it at Comair I think.

ackattacker
08-05-2013, 09:34 AM
I believe you need to get your logbook notarized (all they are really doing is verifying that you are the person who signed it), then you go to the County Clerk where they will sign it verifying that the notary public signed it, then you go to the New York Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that it was signed by the County Clerk. Then you can go the U.S. Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that the New York Department of State has verified that the County Clerk verified that the Notary Public verified that you signed your logbook.

Clear enough?


N4185Q
08-05-2013, 10:47 AM
Thanks, I will try it and see what happens. Have you been successful at obtaining an Apostille on your logbook from the US Dept. of State?

Starlifter
08-05-2013, 10:48 AM
I believe you need to get your logbook notarized (all they are really doing is verifying that you are the person who signed it), then you go to the County Clerk where they will sign it verifying that the notary public signed it, then you go to the New York Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that it was signed by the County Clerk. Then you can go the U.S. Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that the New York Department of State has verified that the County Clerk verified that the Notary Public verified that you signed your logbook.

Clear enough?

I did it in a similar way. Had a Mass State notary make a photo copy of last page. He stamped it. Once stamped it becomes a State document as the notary is registered in the State. Then went to State office where documents are Apostilled, payed the fee. It was apostilled with nice seal and bow. Done...

N4185Q
08-05-2013, 12:53 PM
I did it in a similar way. Had a Mass State notary make a photo copy of last page. He stamped it. Once stamped it becomes a State document as the notary is registered in the State. Then went to State office where documents are Apostilled, payed the fee. It was apostilled with nice seal and bow. Done...

Thanks, that confirms it then. It just seems pointless to have three officials verify each others signatures. I could have pencil whipped the entire logbook and still get an Apostille. What a waste of time and money.

ackattacker
08-05-2013, 06:06 PM
Thanks, I will try it and see what happens. Have you been successful at obtaining an Apostille on your logbook from the US Dept. of State?

No, I have not done this. I just got curious and did a little googling and that's what I came up with.

You might want to find out if they really need an US Dept. of State Apostille or the NY State Apostille will suffice. It does appear that NY State will only Apostille things once the County Clerk has signed them, in that way it is different from Massachusetts (where they will directly Apostille things which are notarized). but I could be wrong about that. I would make some calls to the appropriate places before starting down this road.

Probe
08-05-2013, 09:40 PM
The process of getting a state apostille was accurately described but it may or may not be possible to get you logbook notarized, depending on individual state laws. Some states only allow a notary to stamp a document created in front of them.

Good luck.

EUhoppa
08-06-2013, 07:44 AM
I believe you need to get your logbook notarized (all they are really doing is verifying that you are the person who signed it), then you go to the County Clerk where they will sign it verifying that the notary public signed it, then you go to the New York Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that it was signed by the County Clerk. Then you can go the U.S. Department of State where they will issue you an apostille verifying that the New York Department of State has verified that the County Clerk verified that the Notary Public verified that you signed your logbook.

Clear enough?
Same thing I went through to get my diploma apostilized.

TheFly
08-06-2013, 08:02 AM
...deleted.

Starlifter
08-06-2013, 10:24 AM
No, I have not done this. I just got curious and did a little googling and that's what I came up with.

You might want to find out if they really need an US Dept. of State Apostille or the NY State Apostille will suffice. It does appear that NY State will only Apostille things once the County Clerk has signed them, in that way it is different from Massachusetts (where they will directly Apostille things which are notarized). but I could be wrong about that. I would make some calls to the appropriate places before starting down this road.

At the time i did it, 2005, i was working for/with US State Dept. They would notorize but not apostille. The State dept did clearly point out, at one time, on their website that they did not apostille documents. I found it impossible to get a document apostilled if the said document did not originate in the court or state office where i was trying. My only alternative was the notary method. The receiving party was only concerned it was apostilled, not concerned about who did it.


YMMV.

Probe
08-06-2013, 08:17 PM
An apostille is, by definition, a chain of authentication, in order, from notary, up to and including the state department. It has to start at the bottom. Each step authenticates the previous step.

The final step is embassy authentication, if required.

Depending on which state you are in, the hardest part might be getting a notary to stamp your logbook. If they won't, you might try writing an affidavit swearing the authenticity, sign in front of a notary, and have them notarize the affidavit.

Starlifter
08-07-2013, 09:32 AM
Thank goodness the process is over as i have been employed overseas 9 years. I am still associated with the Embassy in the country I live and the Consular Officer, who is a Notary, still will not apostille any document.
I wish you luck!

Lifter