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movinon
10-06-2013, 03:55 PM
Hello everyone. Long time lurker, first time poster. In two weeks I am going to spend a few days in the city where I am hoping to live to introduce myself to some prospective flight departments. I live on the other side of the country currently, so want to make the most of my visit. I have made some personal contacts at a few companies, but will be 'cold calling' some others. I am wondering if anyone has any advice. I don't really know what to expect, what the attitudes are about military guys, etc. I recently separated from the Air Force and have 2000 TT (almost all multi-engine turbine), 1300 turbine PIC, ATP, FCI medical.

Thanks in advance!


galaxy flyer
10-06-2013, 04:46 PM
Use your personal contacts to establish the local culture, if you're looking at corporates. Do you have a bizjet type rating? Not essential at quality places, but helpful. Any AF experience that is relevant? WHMO? C-40 or 89th time? AF Flight standards? That sort of background trades well.

Where are you looking?

GF

Mink
10-06-2013, 05:37 PM
Not to insult your intelligence, but be humble. Some corporate flight departments, or people within them, may be "intimidated" (for lack of a better term) by ex-mil pilots. A "these little jets look like fun" attitude won't work. Express your desire to learn a whole new side of aviation through corporate flight ops.

As an ex-mil (now corporate) guy myself, I can say I have learned a ton.

Work your contacts and expand your network. Good luck.


JohnnyG
10-06-2013, 05:39 PM
Where are you moving to? You never know who will PM you and take you to lunch, perhaps introduce you to people.

I fly corporate, and many department managers in a town know each other, there's also a lot of hangar sharing and so on.

Best of luck to you.

WARich
10-06-2013, 07:08 PM
Where are you moving to? You never know who will PM you and take you to lunch, perhaps introduce you to people.

I fly corporate, and many department managers in a town know each other, there's also a lot of hangar sharing and so on.

Best of luck to you.

I'm looking in the Seattle area, I'll gladly welcome any PM's for lunch and a connection.....:D

JohnnyG
10-07-2013, 12:48 AM
I'm looking in the Seattle area, I'll gladly welcome any PM's for lunch and a connection.....:D

If I knew people in Seattle I'd help you out. I don't know a soul up there. I'm a Northern CA guy.

Do we have any corporate or local 135 guys in Seattle?

BoilerUP
10-07-2013, 05:10 AM
2000 total time isn't very much, even with 1300 TPIC...did you Palace Chase?

That said, there is much more to one's experience than total time and I'm certain with humility you'll be able to communicate that to a prospective employer.

Good luck!

movinon
10-07-2013, 04:02 PM
Thank you all very much for the advice and words of encouragement. I do acknowledge my flight time isn't exactly a world record and I will humbly explain what I was doing during my 2000 hours. Thanks again and fly safe.

KungFuLarry22
10-11-2013, 07:04 AM
Movinion,

For what its worth I was in your shoes two years ago. Left the Marines with about 1900 to 2000 hours and that included a tour as an Instructor Pilot. Most people will have no idea what 2000 hours in the military equates to and those who do will seek you out ahead of the competition.
The unfortunate thing is this; Insurance companies drive the show now. Additionally, if you want to fly for a flight department that is ARGUS rated you are double hosed. Nobody has found a way to break out what constitutes good flight time and what are just numbers on a page. I won't say hours don't mean anything but we have had some pretty experienced guys (meaning they had a lot of hours) that really struggled in the jet.
I can't advise you either way but I can tell you what I had to do. I left the military and got a job at a commuter airline. Take your pick...they will hire you. You will build up hours faster than anywhere else. I would also search out a reserve unit. If you can give this process a year you will be right in the neighborhood of 3000 hours.
In the meantime dust off your suit and start walking into flight departments. Get a bizjetjobs account and pay the annual fee. Look at the directory for flight departments in your area. Send resumes, emails, showup! Start making the connections. It will probably take a year to get your information circulating around the office. Corporate is a tight knit community. It takes a while to get peoples attention.
Chin up and best of luck!

Larry

BoilerUP
10-11-2013, 07:39 AM
Most people will have no idea what 2000 hours in the military equates to and those who do will seek you out ahead of the competition.

I'm not looking to start a "my way was better than your way" internet bashfest...but I'm really interested for you to expound on this statement a bit.

USMCFLYR
10-11-2013, 09:47 AM
I'm not looking to start a "my way was better than your way" internet bashfest...but I'm really interested for you to expound on this statement a bit.
One way to look at that is that it is a lot of CYCLES. Depending on community you are talking about - it could have very little transit time or time watching the autopilot fly (monitoring). Very hands on and more multi-tasking than other forms of flying. Others - not so much.

A recent example I used in a previous thread was the difference in experience and flying accomplished in the first 250 hrs (for example) between a student pilot from my previous training environment and your ERAU student with 250 hrs.

And before it does devolve into a military -vs- civilian argument - - this same disaprity in the number of hours is evident even among military flying communities too.

KungFuLarry22
10-11-2013, 12:41 PM
USMCFLYR,

Well said Marine! I don't mean to start a battle either, but I wanted to add some encouragement to a brother in arms leaving the service. I don't mean to take anything away from someone who grew up civilian. I have been very impressed with those that I have flown with thus far. Its just that for every hour that a military guy or gal logs there is a lot of blood sweat and tears put into that hour. Extensive planning, briefing, and we do this in between working fourteen other non flying billets. Its hard to come out of the service with this type of work experience and face a difficult job market. Its unfortunate that we (the flying public) can't find a better way to break out and define quality flight time vice just the number of hours a pilot has in his/her logbook. This goes for civilian or military pilots. A tailwheel endorsement, seaplane rating, and or glider rating would also be great indicators of how varied a pilots experience is. Just my opinion...good luck out there Movinon. Please PM me with any questions.

Larry

movinon
10-11-2013, 05:53 PM
Gents-
I can't thank you enough for your advice and encouragement. To paraphrase USMCFLYR, I have had a lot of cycles, and there isn't any 'bonus' in my total time to reflect that vs. cruise on autopilot; same for all the ground duties. That being said, I don't knock anyone that went the civilian route in the least. I will humbly explain the kind of flying I have done to any prospective flight department and hope that it carries some weight. I have plenty to learn when it comes to other segments of aviation and I will be an eager student.

In the meantime, I have been hired by an awesome Reserve unit and can't wait to get some more experience with them. I will be hopefully racking up hours in no time if all goes well, the creeks don't rise, and the government gets back to work. I am still going to knock on some doors in a few weeks and begin the process of getting to know the flight departments. Who knows what will shake out.

Thanks again for the advice and good words. Semper Fi, Aim High, but most of all, fly safe.