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FlyinSailor
07-15-2014, 12:21 PM
While perusing a few websites for corporate pilot positions, each one required time-in-type (but not a type rating) to apply as SIC. Is this the standard and not a minimum which can be waivered?

Without paying for flight time in an aircraft type, I do not see how to meet that minimum requirement. My career in the Navy will soon be over, and I would like to pursue airlines or corporate. Although I meet the mins for legacy airlines, the time-in-type corporate mins as SIC is a hurdle.

I did consider paying for an ATP and type rating (FSI, CAE, or ProFlite), but I read the Citation thread. The consensus was that it was a waste of too much money, however, I do have the GI Bill.

Just wondering how people get a corporate pilot position, but the jobs I have seen all require time-in-type?

Thanks ahead of time for any responses.


galaxy flyer
07-15-2014, 01:26 PM
"Time-in-Type" comes about because there are Chief Pilots who think they can find laid off guys with experience in type. They are becoming rarer, but not extinct. There are still a good number of guys working, but looking for better offers, so that's another source of experienced pilots.

That said, there are plenty of places who will type guys.

GF

eman
07-15-2014, 02:47 PM
While perusing a few websites for corporate pilot positions, each one required time-in-type (but not a type rating) to apply as SIC. Is this the standard and not a minimum which can be waivered?

Without paying for flight time in an aircraft type, I do not see how to meet that minimum requirement. My career in the Navy will soon be over, and I would like to pursue airlines or corporate. Although I meet the mins for legacy airlines, the time-in-type corporate mins as SIC is a hurdle.

I did consider paying for an ATP and type rating (FSI, CAE, or ProFlite), but I read the Citation thread. The consensus was that it was a waste of too much money, however, I do have the GI Bill.

Just wondering how people get a corporate pilot position, but the jobs I have seen all require time-in-type?

Thanks ahead of time for any responses.


This makes it pretty much impossible to get a job at the companies posting the listings whether; they are Part 91/135 unless you have the right connections to help you in without the type rating.

So with that lesson learned, I guess you just have to continue networking and get someone to help you out.

I don't know about the area you are living in, but here in South Fl.
There are a lot of Part 91 operators that from time to time need a copilot for a trip for whatever reason. The insurance policies and countries travelled to in S. America require the pilot's certificate to have SIC priviledges for the aircraft...so what some of the more entrepreneuring guys do is use their connections fly and log the minimum hours required for an SIC signoff from a captain, go to the FAA and present their paperwork/logbook (or a DPE) and obtain their SIC only priviledges without having gone through a sim training program. That then helps to become a contract F/O and start logging hours in the planes they got the SIC in. Sometimes this leads us to a permanent job, and at the very least it helps us to get experience in the aircraft and make more connections. I don't think the SIC priviledges are required to be on your certificate to sit copilot on U.S domestic flights, so just knowing and being friends with a captain may be enough to get called on.

I couldn't get anywhere in my part 91 and 135 job search until I discovered this and went through the process of obtaining 3 types using this method, maybe 2 more in the near future...and keep chasing the corporate dream. It makes for a lot of studying and staying sharp, being able to switch procedures from plane to plane if you hold more than one.

So there's a possible solution for you if you are friends with corporate a/c captains or 135's that manage an owner's aircraft and fly Part 91 legs.

Good luck


NowCorporate
07-15-2014, 03:10 PM
Don't believe what they advertise, its often just desired qualifications.

I don't think I ever met the hour requirement nor the "time in type" required for any of the 3 aviation jobs I have had.

Also, the last 3 pilots we hired - none had type ratings. The cost really isn't much of a concern in the big picture. As its been said a million times, hire the person not the rating. You really don't want to work for a place that thinks otherwise.

At the end of the day it's far more expensive to hire the wrong guy with a rating than it is to hire the right guy and send him to a $50,000 FSI class.

BoilerUP
07-15-2014, 04:50 PM
As its been said a million times, hire the person not the rating. You really don't want to work for a place that thinks otherwise.

Wisdom.

Never, ever spend the money to buy a type rating in the HOPE it helps you get a job - that is almost never a wise financial decision.

Just wondering how people get a corporate pilot position

Networking. Not the false kind that is set up solely to further one's career, the genuine kind where you actually get to know somebody outside of simply flying airplanes.

Going back to the above wisdom, you hire the person not the type rating...but its generally considers a "safer" move to hire a known or semi-known quantity, vs. a total stranger. I consider people I know, or people that come recommended from people I trust, before I consider "off the street" types...and I don't think I'm in left field on that. Hence, the value of networking.

Sounds
07-18-2014, 06:47 AM
...unless you have the right connections to help you in without the type rating.

That's life for you. Just like what BoilerUp said, jumping into a sweet position requires sweet connections. The industry is such that getting experience is expensive, which adds an extra level of difficulty than other jobs.

Catch22 for guys out of college too, every entry level position wants 2years experience. Gotta get creative with how you get it...

FlyinSailor
07-18-2014, 01:22 PM
Thank you for all the replies.

Networking will not work at the moment since I do not live close to the locations I am interested in (South FL). Once I leave the Navy, I will have the opportunity to do so. Unfortunately, all the pilots I know are either military or airlines.

I will just have to apply and see what happens. After all, cannot be told TBNT unless I apply.

RI830
07-18-2014, 02:31 PM
Wisdom.

Never, ever spend the money to buy a type rating in the HOPE it helps you get a job - that is almost never a wise financial decision.

Tell that to the countless SWA hopefuls who shelled out coin for the 737 type.
Pay to play?

A good dept will hire the right person/personality and train them.
The cost of a type is pennies in comparison.

aviatorhi
07-18-2014, 06:38 PM
Tell that to the countless SWA hopefuls who shelled out coin for the 737 type.
Pay to play?

A good dept will hire the right person/personality and train them.
The cost of a type is pennies in comparison.

My understand is southwest wants a rating prior to starting training (not interviewing), from a training perspective this at least helps with only requiring a company check (rather than a practical exam), and generally speeds training due to the trainees familiarity with the aircraft.

Note: I do not work for SWA, and don't have any particular desire to at this time, though I do have a 737 rating.

RI830
07-18-2014, 07:21 PM
My understand is southwest wants a rating prior to starting training (not interviewing), from a training perspective this at least helps with only requiring a company check (rather than a practical exam), and generally speeds training due to the trainees familiarity with the aircraft.

Note: I do not work for SWA, and don't have any particular desire to at this time, though I do have a 737 rating.

At current time, SWA requires the type prior to start of training.
For years and years, they required the type to even get the interview.

By doing this they are able to shorten the initial trading to just a few days. Company Indoc, company procedures, sim/sop's and your done.
They slam new hires from day 1 to first flight in less than two weeks.