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View Full Version : Foreign to U.S 121 Major


headchief
10-28-2014, 12:09 AM
Hello all, currently a chief pilot at a failing 125 operator with 2 Captain job offers from Japanese Airlines. I would like to stay in the U.S and fly for any Major, but my phone is not ringing. Is anyone here successful in getting hired in the U.S after their contract expired? Can the type rating be transferred over to my FAA ATP? Will foreign A320 PIC time look favorable on the Major Apps?


Twin Wasp
10-28-2014, 12:23 AM
Can the type rating be transferred over to my FAA ATP?

No, you are still required to have a record of ground and flight training from an authorized instructor and pass a checkride. How much training would depend on where you go.

Typhoonpilot
10-28-2014, 05:31 AM
No, you are still required to have a record of ground and flight training from an authorized instructor and pass a checkride. How much training would depend on where you go.


More accurately you must have completed an "approved course" then take an FAA type ride. Unless you have the type on a Canadian license in which case it can be transferred over.


TP


PotatoChip
10-28-2014, 10:55 AM
Hello all, currently a chief pilot at a failing 125 operator with 2 Captain job offers from Japanese Airlines. I would like to stay in the U.S and fly for any Major, but my phone is not ringing. Is anyone here successful in getting hired in the U.S after their contract expired? Can the type rating be transferred over to my FAA ATP? Will foreign A320 PIC time look favorable on the Major Apps?

At least a few guys from my Japanese contract job have left and gone back to a US major, one last week in fact.

4runner
11-12-2014, 03:34 PM
You're still a unknown product. I'm having the same issue. You might have to take a 135 gig doing medevac to get your feet back on US soil before being seriously considered. Another good step is to go to job fairs. I drove straight to FLL after a 4 leg, 3 continent commute and scored 2 interviews with Airbus LCC's. Don't freak out or lose hope Skipper. You're experienced and can think outside the box. They'd be lucky to have you and should welcome your credentials.

Flitestar
11-14-2014, 05:25 PM
Good friend of mine flying at Emirates (FO) just got hired by a U.S. major while flying in the UAE. He flew over to US and attended a few job fairs on his days off, flew back again for the interview and now is waiting on a class date.

It's definitely possible.

LostInAsia
11-15-2014, 06:59 PM
I flew a contract in Japan for 7 years and left to come to a US major. The overseas time was not look at any differently than US airline time. In fact, I think it is something that makes you stand out from the masses.

gcpilot
11-15-2014, 10:57 PM
Do the majors, LCCs and legacies in the US ever hire DEC or is it always FO upgraded to the left seat?

Readback
11-16-2014, 06:43 AM
Do the majors, LCCs and legacies in the US ever hire DEC or is it always FO upgraded to the left seat?

Seniority based. No DEC.

The Dominican
11-16-2014, 07:47 AM
Seniority based. No DEC.
Start ups do hire DEC's..., Eastern for example has DEC openings now, but it is not typical

gcpilot
11-16-2014, 12:00 PM
Seniority based. No DEC.

Start ups do hire DEC's..., Eastern for example has DEC openings now, but it is not typical

So a Captain who has considerable amount of TPIC (5000+...for argument's sake) criss- crossing all over the world out of the middle east(EK,QR,EY,FD etc) or Asia(VN,EVA, AJX etc.) would never make it to the top rankings of Legacies in the US because of the age and seniority based system?

I suppose expat pilots will run into the age situation as they spend years abroad flying and there is virtually no DEC positions offered by the Legacies here in the US despite multi thousands of TPIC. So, time is of the essence in this scenario if one wants to enjoy being in the top rankings of the food chain?

maddogmax
11-16-2014, 12:41 PM
So a Captain who has considerable amount of TPIC (5000+...for argument's sake) criss- crossing all over the world out of the middle east(EK,QR,EY,FD etc) or Asia(VN,EVA, AJX etc.) would never make it to the top rankings of Legacies in the US because of the age and seniority based system?

I suppose expat pilots will run into the age situation as they spend years abroad flying and there is virtually no DEC positions offered by the Legacies here in the US despite multi thousands of TPIC. So, time is of the essence in this scenario if one wants to enjoy being in the top rankings of the food chain?
Your experience might help you gate hired by a Legacy in the US but your upgrade time will be based on your Date of Hire (DOH). Your age will only determine when you have to retire.

Readback
11-16-2014, 03:36 PM
So a Captain who has considerable amount of TPIC (5000+...for argument's sake) criss- crossing all over the world out of the middle east(EK,QR,EY,FD etc) or Asia(VN,EVA, AJX etc.) would never make it to the top rankings of Legacies in the US because of the age and seniority based system?

I suppose expat pilots will run into the age situation as they spend years abroad flying and there is virtually no DEC positions offered by the Legacies here in the US despite multi thousands of TPIC. So, time is of the essence in this scenario if one wants to enjoy being in the top rankings of the food chain?

Expat pilots from the US knew what the situation was before they left.

iflysky
11-16-2014, 04:46 PM
Sorry to get a little bit off topic here, but what do you guys think, for those that made the jump to the majors. Is it really "the holy grail" of aviation as claimed by thousands ? I totally understand it's a very subjective questions and has a lot of variables such as age, money, stability, home and so forth. However, just in general, is it all it's made out to be ? I've worked for a US low-cost, a ME airline and now in the Far East, so I've been "around the block" so to say, just wandering ?

Readback
11-16-2014, 05:50 PM
Sorry to get a little bit off topic here, but what do you guys think, for those that made the jump to the majors. Is it really "the holy grail" of aviation as claimed by thousands ? I totally understand it's a very subjective questions and has a lot of variables such as age, money, stability, home and so forth. However, just in general, is it all it's made out to be ? I've worked for a US low-cost, a ME airline and now in the Far East, so I've been "around the block" so to say, just wandering ?

I need 10 characters, yes.

PotatoChip
11-17-2014, 11:03 AM
I currently have zero desire to leave my job for a legacy. But that's me, and that's at this moment.

The Dominican
11-17-2014, 11:19 AM
I currently have zero desire to leave my job for a legacy. But that's me, and that's at this moment.

Ditto...! There are a lot of people that are perfectly happy with their jobs abroad, but many factors play into it.

captjns
11-17-2014, 01:30 PM
I currently have zero desire to leave my job for a legacy. But that's me, and that's at this moment.

The way US carriers layoff at a whim? Why?

No notice base changes? Painfully expensive and tough commutes for some.

How many years to sit in the right seat before getting one's command with the US carriers? Not worth the down grade to many.

The current turmoil between HP and USAir pilots and probably a wee bit of discord between the three groups? Who needs the drama?

Typhoonpilot
11-17-2014, 04:17 PM
I'm in the camp that anyone under age 45 should seriously consider the move back to a legacy. It may not be right for everyone, but long term it is likely best for most of the younger guys.

The U.S. majors are in a hiring spree not seen since the late 70s and early 80s. Forget the last 20-30 years of history as all the negative trends have finally worked their way through the system. The RJ revolution; age 65 change; industry consolidation; etc are not a factor anymore. You'll have long haul LCCs to deal with, but that really shouldn't slow growth too much.

Remember, for most of the last decade+ I was the big advocate of the move overseas, but I always had the caveat it was for guys who were either furloughed; retired early without their pension; or who were older and wanted a chance at career fulfillment before they retired.

The younger guys who made the move have likely reached their career goals at a very young age. I know B777 captains in their early 30s. They can easily have a good 25 to 30 year career at a U.S. major; living at home in the USA; having a just (for the most part) legal system; union protections; etc. Big difference from the stress of overseas living and often arbitrary legal/company rules and punishment.



TP

Sliceback
11-17-2014, 07:38 PM
Typhoon hits it out of the park again. It's not about the last decade or two. It's about identifying the future. SW hasn't the carrier of choice in the 1990's. It was in the 2000's. It isn't today. Actually had empty slots in a training class last month. That was unheard of 5 years ago.

Guys hired in the last year are quitting some jobs that people would have killed for a couple of years ago. SW? No show. AA? No show and quit. DL? No shows and quit. Hired by UA? No thanks, got a better deal. It's starting to look like the mid 1980's, get hired at a big airline but leave for your first choice if they call.

Upgrade times at the Big 3 is in the 8-10 year range. About half of the pilots are gone in 10 yrs. Half. It's a stunning number. 800-1000 pilots per year retiring from EACH legacy carrier starting in the 2020's.

W/b upgrade is about 5 years after the initial upgrade. Could be as quick as four yrs after first upgrade opportunity.

This hiring wave is not for growth, it's for retirements.

At one point AA had HALF of their pilots retire in about a five year span. DL and UA probably have similar stats.

Talking with a couple of newhires today. They got hired in the first month or two of AA's hiring. Christmas off. Think about that, still on probation and have Christmas off. Stunning. They'll be off reserve at the 12-13 month mark.

And the upgrade time to n/b CA might hold at around 10 years for the first couple of years. Why? AA's hiring about 600 this year. In 10 years they'll be retiring about 1000. The guys hired for the couple of years will upgrade at about the same LOS as the first newhires. W/b upgrade will start to lag the first movers.

DL has 7 crew bases that should be around.
AA has 10.
UA has 10.

There are lots of places to live within 2 hrs of those cities or you can commute.

The Dominican
11-18-2014, 03:23 AM
Typhoon hits it out of the park again. It's not about the last decade or two. It's about identifying the future.

Identifying the future hum:rolleyes: good luck with that in this paid hobby of ours..!

I'm in the camp of this is nothing but an upswing in a notoriously cyclical industry and if you believe that "nothing but blue skies ahead" nonsense, I have a beautiful beachfront property 60 miles north of Tokyo for sale if you are interested, the place is so beautiful that it glows.

Sliceback
11-18-2014, 06:31 AM
Not pushing "nothing but blue skies."

But having 50% of the seniority list retire at the Big 3 in the next ten years is a situation never seen before.

In a decade, with retirements totaling about 2,000 every two years at each of the Big 3, or about 15% of the seniority list, the odds of furloughs happening at the Big 3 will be very, very low.

Old rule of thumb was they didn't furlough until it would be 5% for at least a year. They'll have 5% retiring about every 8 months which would make the risk of furloughs pretty small. Not zero, but low odds. And that's in 10 years. So the risk is highest now and will reduce as the retirement bubble builds in the coming years.

The Dominican
11-18-2014, 06:59 AM
Because retirements is a new phenomenon in this business...! Sorry, but I heard the same reasoning a couple of times while I was given the "welcome to your last job in aviation" speech...., it is nothing but another cycle..! That's it.

Thedude
11-18-2014, 08:05 AM
Because retirements is a new phenomenon in this business...! Sorry, but I heard the same reasoning a couple of times while I was given the "welcome to your last job in aviation" speech...., it is nothing but another cycle..! That's it.

I will agree with you
but
We have never seen a retirement schedule so aggressive in the past waves/cycles.

With that, I am not going to go out and buy and another house....yet.
Cautiously optimistic.

Sliceback
11-18-2014, 10:40 AM
What airlines, and when, did you get those speeches?

A big retirement year used to be about 2% of the list.

In the next 11 yrs AAG's mandatory retirements are 64% of the entire seniority list. Six percent a year and that will continue for two more years for an average of 6% per year for 13 years.

apc airline profile has the total pilot count and the annual retirements. Guys can estimate their career progression.

Guys can figure out for themselves is 3x the typical high retirement year, for 13 years, is just the usual cycle.

hoover
11-18-2014, 01:45 PM
Airlines could also just shrink or get more productivity to curb some of the retirements.

The Dominican
11-18-2014, 02:55 PM
After 33 years in this business, if I have learned anything is that no one can estimate their career progression. Just an upswing cycle, that's all!

captjns
11-19-2014, 07:04 AM
Just like anything in life... What goes up must come down. Its been a proven fact in our industry over the years. True the effects of a future furlough will be offset from the upcoming retirees that joined the industry during the growth during the '80s.

gcpilot
11-19-2014, 08:53 AM
I guess it would still be true to say that QOL is better in the US while money and faster time to upgrade outside the US (Middle East, Asia); of course MOST of the time and not always.

captjns
11-19-2014, 09:03 AM
I guess it would still be true to say that QOL is better in the US while money and faster time to upgrade outside the US (Middle East, Asia); of course MOST of the time and not always.

Depends where one is based.

Sliceback
11-19-2014, 12:19 PM
Legacy upgrades are probably in the 8-10 yr range for the earliest newhires.

And with peak retirements in the mid 2020's exceeding the current hiring numbers guys hired later in the wave might have upgrade times that might be around 10 yrs(?).

Probe
11-19-2014, 03:30 PM
Not pushing "nothing but blue skies."

But having 50% of the seniority list retire at the Big 3 in the next ten years is a situation never seen before.

In a decade, with retirements totaling about 2,000 every two years at each of the Big 3, or about 15% of the seniority list, the odds of furloughs happening at the Big 3 will be very, very low.

Old rule of thumb was they didn't furlough until it would be 5% for at least a year. They'll have 5% retiring about every 8 months which would make the risk of furloughs pretty small. Not zero, but low odds. And that's in 10 years. So the risk is highest now and will reduce as the retirement bubble builds in the coming years.


I would recommend listening to Typhoon and Dom. I was hired at a legacy in the mid 90's, 5 years later I was 50% up a list of 12,000 pilots. 14 years later, I have worked my way back up to 50% up a list of 12,000 pilots.

A "normal" rate of retirement would be about 3%, assuming the average pilot has a 30-35 year career. A couple of legacies, including mine, are right at the rate right now. In 8-10 years is does go up, but it is certainly not "huge".

There is really no scheduled growth at the legacies. There is a short term hiring boom to deal with a new FAA rest rule (117). That should be sorted out in a year and it will go back to just replacing retiring pilots.

Other what ifs? The commuter airlines can't recruit pilots because their aren't any. It is possible you will see the legacies in-source those airlines just to get the pilots locked into their seniority system.

Threats? Ebola, ISIS, middle eastern carriers, carriers like Norwegian trying and succeeding in "Flag of Convenience". The biggest potential threat in 10-15 years is single pilot ops. There goes the pilot shortage. Again. This is in addition to the normal 7-10 year economic roller coaster.

I have done 2 contracts and worked at a legacy. For me, I prefer the contract world. That is just me. Others may differ.

Eldee5
11-19-2014, 08:23 PM
http://www.airlinepilotforums.com/foreign/83729-emirates-road-show-5.html

Sliceback
11-20-2014, 05:25 AM
Starting in 2021 a 1/3 of the entire seniority list retires in 4.5 years. 4,000 pilots for an average of 74 per month for 4.5 years. We'll just have to disagree with the definition of 'huge'.

The Legacy carriers are growing at approx. 1.5% per year. Small percentage but if it continues they'll be 10% larger when the peak retirement bubble hits (an average of almost 8% per year)

Probe
11-20-2014, 05:21 PM
Starting in 2021 a 1/3 of the entire seniority list retires in 4.5 years. 4,000 pilots for an average of 74 per month for 4.5 years. We'll just have to disagree with the definition of 'huge'.

The Legacy carriers are growing at approx. 1.5% per year. Small percentage but if it continues they'll be 10% larger when the peak retirement bubble hits (an average of almost 8% per year)

You have to specify what "growing" is. When the airlines publish growth, it is a growth in ASM's. How many seats fly how many miles. All the majors are replacing 50 seaters with 70-90 seaters. So those extra seat miles count. UAL and DAL are putting skinny backed seats on their narrow bodies that increase the number of seats on the aircraft by 1 or 2 rows. Our management has stated in public that ALL of our increase in ASM's is related to these two factors.

Most "growth" is actually just more seats being carried. I know at least 2 of the majors, including mine, are shrinking their mainline fleets.

The only current "growth" for pilots is 117 related. DAL is also insourcing some regional flying on their 717's and UAL is looking to do the same. AAR is such an abortion that I am not sure they have even gotten around to planning anything.

Eldee5
11-21-2014, 01:06 PM
The biggest potential threat in 10-15 years is single pilot ops.
Great post Probe, and thank you. But in light of the fact that all newest jets are dual pilot designed and operated (A380, A350, 777x, 787s etc...), do you think that the 10-15 years prediction might be a bit too early. Not to mention the fact that most of the worldwide (and US domestic for that matter) airspaces and regulatory structures are no where near capable of supporting such an operation.

The Dominican
11-21-2014, 01:17 PM
Great post Probe, and thank you. But in light of the fact that all newest jets are dual pilot designed and operated (A380, A350, 777x, 787s etc...), do you think that the 10-15 years prediction might be a bit too early. Not to mention the fact that most of the worldwide (and US domestic for that matter) airspaces and regulatory structures are no where near capable of supporting such an operation.
Not as difficult as you might think.., a conversion kit to place the gear lever on the left side, an approved single pilot training course like they already have for some Citation jets, B1900 etc..., and voilą...., single pilot operations, I am trying to figure out what needs to change in terms of airspace regulations:confused: and about regulatory requirements..., well, that's why we have lobbyist (not us really, but the ones that will benefit) :eek: we might not see single pilot operations in ten years in pax operations but freight? We actually might.

Probe
11-21-2014, 04:48 PM
Unmanned aircraft will require lots of regulatory approval, but we will see UAV's flying on the airways within 5 years, maybe less.

Single pilot ops on commercial aircraft? It might not be that hard. On long international routes it might be very difficult due to different countries' regulations. Domestically and/or N America? I stand by my 10-15 year prediction.

You could easily have a 2nd pilot monitoring the TO and Landing phase of the flight in real time. He could be the 2nd pilot during those phases, and maybe jump in if there was an emergency. That 2nd pilot would do only that: Sit in an AI cubicle and do nothing but be the backup for take-offs and landings.

Predator drones are single/dual pilot. One pilot takes off and then hands the drone off to the mission pilot. After the mission is complete a different "landing" pilot takes over and lands.

I would guess this is the route they will take to reduce risk and save crew expenses as quickly as possible. One in the cockpit, but a second one monitoring the take off and landing.

4runner
11-21-2014, 09:03 PM
Dominican...do you have lots of free time or are just a cool guy? You're always posting and trying to help. I think it's the later and I appreciate your insight. I'm actually thinking of applying but have PRK eye surgery as I had a Navy opportunity. Either way, thanks for your help and your commitment to our profession and to your fellow pilots. Our paths will probably cross at one point. Keep the sushi rice side down and the Boeing blue side up. There's some really really outstanding people left in this job and I think you're one of them. I don't want a job or rec from you, I have just noticed how honest and dedicated you are to us, this career and trying to hook a brother up. I've done the same and I've never been burned. All the best and keep it up.

4runner
11-21-2014, 09:27 PM
I got furloughed in my mid 20's, was promoted by an overseas carrier to Captain in my late 20's, promoted again to Boeing Captain at 32. We paid our dues and some of us may choose to stay overseas. I've met professional mercenary pilots that have a house in St. Maarten and Florida(simultaneously), a girlfriend in the Third World, a wife in the US, a healthy bank account and a great quality of life. If you are a Boeing or Airbus Captain already, you can probably always put food on your table. If you don't wanna go back to narrow body FO with cat farmer FA's, fair enough. I have a few of my training Captains that were furloughed major airline guys making this transition and are complaining. I even have one former Skipper that lives in Guam(where I was conceived by a Navy pilot I call Dad) that is hating it. Who knows where we will end up?

The Dominican
11-22-2014, 03:35 AM
@4runner....!

Thank you for your kind words but I'm undeserving, I just do what was done for me at one point or another.

iflysky
11-22-2014, 03:40 AM
BTW 4runner,

Corrective Eye Surgery procedures (such as LASIK or PRK) are now being accepted by AJX and JCAB. Additional testing will be required.

Straight off the recruitment website !

QuagmireGiggity
01-04-2015, 04:30 PM
What airlines, and when, did you get those speeches?

A big retirement year used to be about 2% of the list.

In the next 11 yrs AAG's mandatory retirements are 64% of the entire seniority list. Six percent a year and that will continue for two more years for an average of 6% per year for 13 years.

apc airline profile has the total pilot count and the annual retirements. Guys can estimate their career progression.

Guys can figure out for themselves is 3x the typical high retirement year, for 13 years, is just the usual cycle.
Bingo ... massive movement.

Leftseatbound
01-04-2015, 11:12 PM
I'm older than 45 and without reservation heading back home. I've been in the sand pit for a few years and one thing I've learned "there's no place like home". I've been operating under a system where any labor group association is illegal and where the company has 100% control. Any descent regional with a union back home puts these working conditions to shame. Yes your pay will be more anywhere in the desert, but definitely comes with a huge cost, not only to the pilot (chronic fatigue) but also to your family. Commuting it's not an option and insain if you try it, trust me on this one. Just my 2 cents.

airspeed1974
01-06-2015, 09:56 AM
I've been an expat since 2003 part time and full time since 2008. Flew bizjets for most of it but airlines since 2009. Been to 92 countries and lives in 12.

Being an expat allowed me far greater opportunities when there were none back home. For the most part the interview process is much simpler, the medical on the other hand is not.

Now coming up on my 5th year in China on the 737NG and the company is raising our salary close to 2,000 usd a month which will put us over 20 grand a month take home (yes there's ways around the exemption so you don't have to pay squat)

However, as one poster has said....there is nothing like home. Some of us have been fortunate enough to save enough to semi retire or full retire.

Turning 41 next month and I too want to come home and would do so in a heartbeat. 8 years full time overseas is enough

I've put in apps to many, haven't heard a thing. I'm 1 year out from finishing the degree. Maybe that's why

Only rumour I did hear which is unsettling is that airlines back home don't like to hire those of us who have been gone a long time.

I'm not sure that applies to EY or EK but I'm thinking is in SE Asia might have a problem

The Dominican
01-06-2015, 12:55 PM
Only rumour I did hear which is unsettling is that airlines back home don't like to hire those of us who have been gone a long time.

I'm not sure that applies to EY or EK but I'm thinking is in SE Asia might have a problem

Absolute nonsense dude..., I know many guys that have gone back from the dessert as well as Asia to all mayors in the US.., some of our guys went to DAL/UAL after being in Japan since 08..., now, no degree is another thing...!

Strangely enough, two tried to come back to Japan (VA & UAL) but they couldn't since they left mid contract....!

EMBskillz
01-06-2015, 01:44 PM
I've been an expat since 2003 part time and full time since 2008. Flew bizjets for most of it but airlines since 2009. Been to 92 countries and lives in 12.

Being an expat allowed me far greater opportunities when there were none back home. For the most part the interview process is much simpler, the medical on the other hand is not.

Now coming up on my 5th year in China on the 737NG and the company is raising our salary close to 2,000 usd a month which will put us over 20 grand a month take home (yes there's ways around the exemption so you don't have to pay squat)

However, as one poster has said....there is nothing like home. Some of us have been fortunate enough to save enough to semi retire or full retire.

Turning 41 next month and I too want to come home and would do so in a heartbeat. 8 years full time overseas is enough

I've put in apps to many, haven't heard a thing. I'm 1 year out from finishing the degree. Maybe that's why

Only rumour I did hear which is unsettling is that airlines back home don't like to hire those of us who have been gone a long time.

I'm not sure that applies to EY or EK but I'm thinking is in SE Asia might have a problem


Bro,

Any love for Jetblue, Virgin America, Alaska, (how bout Hawaiian) or some of the other majors?

Just curious what you are willing to return for.

Peace

Probe
01-06-2015, 04:09 PM
Absolute nonsense dude..., I know many guys that have gone back from the dessert as well as Asia to all mayors in the US.., some of our guys went to DAL/UAL after being in Japan since 08..., now, no degree is another thing...!

Strangely enough, two tried to come back to Japan (VA & UAL) but they couldn't since they left mid contract....!

The last two lines are words of wisdom. A lot of people dream of a notional "dream" airline career at a major legacy carrier. The reality may not be what you think it is.

I flew for a legacy carrier for 14 years (including now), and two contracts in the middle of that. I will take the expat jobs any time. Coming back was a mistake that I will correct as soon as the timing is right.

That is just me. Others may differ.

No degree is still a show stopper 99% of the time at a major legacy carrier anywhere. Even some contracts (China a Korea) require it as it is a visa requirement for a "foreign expert".

LostInAsia
01-06-2015, 06:25 PM
I left the contract world after about 7 years to go to a US legacy as a new hire and while its not a dream job by any means, it is better in almost every aspect that matters. Financially, I come out much better here in the US in the long run and have a lot more time at home. I am moving to my base in the next few months and have a 20 min drive to work and am able to enjoy my hobbies on my days off that I could not easily do living overseas. Being at home in my bed for 20+ nights a month is pretty nice too.

Of course I have been home every night for the last 6 months since I have been out on leave enjoying my 2nd career which would never have been possible had I stayed in the contract world. What I really do miss is the frequent flier miles......

The Dominican
01-07-2015, 03:11 AM
Financially, I come out much better here in the US in the long run

For you that are in your early 30's..., Sure! For the 50+ folks it just doesn't make any sense..., that's why attrition of US guys here has all but stopped. Plus we still have a steady stream of guys from the US and Europe coming in..., all new faces around here.

captjns
01-07-2015, 08:38 AM
As an expat, one is control of their domain, wealth accumulation schemes, and diversity in global cultural experiences. Never been at the mercy of others to negotiate my terms and conditions. Never been furloughed, flowed back to the right seat or experienced pay cuts. With a 4 year hiatus back in the states some years back, it's been a 23 year vacation/adventure from Asia, Europe, Central and South America.

Yeah the dream jobs in the US are available... But keep in mind US jobs can vaporize as fast as the crop up.... Without warning.

LostInAsia
01-07-2015, 11:53 AM
But keep in mind US jobs can vaporize as fast as the crop up.... Without warning.

This is just as true in the contract world as well.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both routes. Painting either one as the panacea of aviation is to ignore the realities of the industry.

LostInAsia
01-07-2015, 02:04 PM
For you that are in your early 30's..., Sure! For the 50+ folks it just doesn't make any sense..., that's why attrition of US guys here has all but stopped. Plus we still have a steady stream of guys from the US and Europe coming in..., all new faces around here.

That actually depends on a lot of variables. When you sit down and run the numbers, if you have 10 years or more left, you may come out better returning to the US.

Assuming the base and retirement pay of the last AJX numbers that I had, after 10 years, you would net around $1,608,000.

10 years under the current UA contract, assuming 80 hours per month at the smallest narrowbody fleet, pay and retirement nets you $1,450,000.

Most people do not stay on the smallest narrowbody fleet that long, and most line holders get more than 80 hours. Nor does that include any profit sharing or upgrading at less than 10 years and maintain current contract rates for the next 10 years. It also does not take into account expat tax benefits or contract completion bonuses and assumes you start as a CAP on the contract.

PotatoChip
01-07-2015, 06:12 PM
This is just as true in the contract world as well.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both routes. Painting either one as the panacea of aviation is to ignore the realities of the industry.

Yeah, but in the expat world you don't lose all seniority and pay when your job goes away. You're capable of making a lateral move without taking a 50%+ paycut.

captjns
01-07-2015, 06:38 PM
Yeah, but in the expat world you don't lose all seniority and pay when your job goes away. You're capable of making a lateral move without taking a 50%+ paycut.

Notwithstanding a termination of benefits which have been self funded and controlled without risk of forfeiture. The savings of dues funded loss of license, life's and medical benefits too.

But on the flip, to work within a half hour of home is not too bad either, that is, of course, one is fortunate enough to land a base with a carrier in the same area where one lives without having to move.

Stormblesses
01-31-2015, 11:11 AM
More accurately you must have completed an "approved course" then take an FAA type ride. Unless you have the type on a Canadian license in which case it can be transferred over.


TP

So if you fly in Canada that is an exception? I am looking at flying outside of the US but would like to avoid extra Minutiae...if possible ;)

Twin Wasp
02-01-2015, 01:32 AM
The FAA and Transport Canada have an agreement to issue certificates/licenses based on the other country's license/certificate. Normally if you hold a foreign license the FAA will only grant you a private certificate based on the foreign license. If you hold a Canadian license the FAA will grant you a certificate at the same level in four steps, TSA, verification from TC, FAA medical and a short knowledge test. No checkride. The ATP level had a wrench thrown in the works. The FAA cancelled the 40 question Canadian pilot ATP written last year. They have proposed a new 60 question test but have not released it yet. And the 60 question test requires the ATP CTP class before you can take it.