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View Full Version : Keeping ATP valid


acepilot100
12-06-2014, 05:59 PM
Hi all,

Been a while since I've been in the CFI world, so sorry about the basic question. I figured that there has to be some others on here who are in the same boat as I am, so here goes.

I worked for an airline until April 2015, I was there for 7 years, and decided that I wanted out of the lifestyle and switched careers. I have an ATP that I got while I was at the airline, which was previously a commercial single engine privileges. I now have type ratings in a CL-65 and ERJ-170 and 190. My last training event was in February of 2015 (a proficiency check at the airline). My ATP license says issued December of 2012.

My question is this: what do I need to do to keep this license valid? I am not flying much at all anymore, but would still like to keep it valid. Do I just need to complete a biennial flight review to ATP standards? If so, when does that need to be done by? Two years from the last training event, or two years from the date on my license?

Thanks for the help.


ScottyDo
12-06-2014, 06:06 PM
... are you living in the future?

galaxy flyer
12-06-2014, 06:58 PM
The requirement is a BFR every two years, so two years from your last training. The license date is merely issuance.

GF


TheFly
12-06-2014, 07:05 PM
The requirement is a BFR every two years, so two years from your last training. The license date is merely issuance.

GF

This^ & to carry passengers, 3 take offs & landings within the preceding 90 days in category, class & type. Night…full stop.

Twin Wasp
12-06-2014, 07:21 PM
You'll have an ATP until you die unless you do something stupid. The FAA uses the term "valid" along the lines of "surrendered, suspended, revoked or expired."

You won't be current unless you have three TO & landings with in the last 90 days and a Flight Review within the last 24 months. The FAA dropped the "B" years ago.

In addition, to be current in a plane requiring a type rating, you need a PC in an aircraft that requires a type within the last 12 months and a PC in that type aircraft within the last 24 months.

acepilot100
12-07-2014, 03:39 AM
Great information, guys, thanks. I appreciate all of your help.

Skylane93S
12-07-2014, 06:51 AM
In addition, to be current in a plane requiring a type rating, you need a PC in an aircraft that requires a type within the last 12 months and a PC in that type aircraft within the last 24 months.

I could be wrong, but isn't that TURBOJET only? e.g.- I don't think a PC would be required in say, a BE-300(?)

rickair7777
12-07-2014, 08:26 AM
I could be wrong, but isn't that TURBOJET only? e.g.- I don't think a PC would be required in say, a BE-300(?)

That's 121/135 only.

For part 91 (not sure about k) all you need is BFR and three bounces to carry pax, and IR currency if needed.

The ATP will never expire, you just need the applicable currency tickets punched for the tour of flying you want to do.

wizepilot
12-07-2014, 09:02 AM
If your last training event was in Feb. 2014 (not 2015 as you must have typo'd), then your flight review status is good until Feb. 2016. Still have to have 3 TO and landings last 90 days for currency for passengers. Issuance date on the ATP means nothing, it's yours forever unless you do something really dumb.

Skylane93S
12-07-2014, 10:04 AM
That's 121/135 only.

For part 91 (not sure about k) all you need is BFR and three bounces to carry pax, and IR currency if needed.

The ATP will never expire, you just need the applicable currency tickets punched for the tour of flying you want to do.

I agree that the ATP will never expire... I was just suggesting that the "PC" (61.58) mentioned above only applies to turbojets.

Even a private pilot with a jet type needs a 61.58 to operate 91...right?

Twin Wasp
12-07-2014, 11:27 AM
I was simplifying for the OP since both his types are turbojets. 61.58 applies if the aircraft is turbojet or requires more than one pilot. So you could do a Lear type ride and then not fly it for 23 months, have a DC-3 ride at the 12 month point and then take the Lear around the pattern three times in the 24th month and meet the letter of the law.