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View Full Version : Re-qualify after 20 year absence?


Rotator
02-09-2015, 08:38 AM
HI All,

Background: Former Part 121 F/O with COMM, INST, MULTI. About 860 TT, most of which is multi/turboprop. Left aviation a long time ago, but I am projecting an early retirement (at age 50) in a few years and want to re-enter flying as a flight instructor.

I haven't touched an airplane in almost 20 years.

Question: How can I get myself re-qualified in a fairly short amount of time and get my instructor ticket? Are there any flight schools that sort of "specialize" in breathing new life into has-beens like me? I think I need to go all the way back to the basics and approach this as though I were a zero-time student, but I'm not sure. Does anyone have any similar stories? How did you get back into the air?

Thanks in advance for all helpfuls posts.


awax
02-09-2015, 08:49 AM
Question: How can I get myself re-qualified in a fairly short amount of time and get my instructor ticket? Are there any flight schools that sort of "specialize" in breathing new life into has-beens like me? I think I need to go all the way back to the basics and approach this as though I were a zero-time student, but I'm not sure. Does anyone have any similar stories? How did you get back into the air?




How many hours will it take for you to be

a.) current
b.) proficient
c.) comptent to present yourself as an instructor

With your previous experience you have "muscle memory" and a much better concept than most of what the training will entail, however, much has changed in terms of regs, etc.

If you're disciplined, you could do a video refresher course and read, read, and read to get your level of knowledge to the point of where a CFI candidate should be. This would be much less expensive than trying to clear the cobwebs with the hobbs meter running. You will of course need to fly to get current and proficient. Only you and your CFI can make the call how many hours you'll need to be a viable CFI student. Like you say, start from the beginning and review everything.

Smile, and enjoy the journey.

kingsnake2
02-09-2015, 10:18 AM
We've done this sort of training at US Aviation before and it varies vastly person to person. We've had some take a year and others be ready to go with a couple weeks of refresher on instrument, maneuvers, and FOI.


Rotator
02-09-2015, 11:01 AM
We've done this sort of training at US Aviation before and it varies vastly person to person. We've had some take a year and others be ready to go with a couple weeks of refresher on instrument, maneuvers, and FOI.

Kingsnake2, does US Aviation ever hire those re-treads as instructors afterward?

Rotator
02-09-2015, 11:02 AM
Thanx awax!

airtaxi101
02-09-2015, 10:19 PM
I would begin studying for the FOI and FAI written exams. That will refresh your memory and help get the idea of what to learn to effectively teach. Get those out of the way before go and spend 5 or 6K at a flight school. Might also go to the local FBO and get checked out in a trainer to get rid of the rust. Might be shocked by the inflated costs, probably double hour rate in past 20 years.

kingsnake2
02-10-2015, 05:44 AM
Kingsnake2, does US Aviation ever hire those re-treads as instructors afterward?

Yes, we have 2-3 right now.

Navajo31
02-10-2015, 01:42 PM
AOPA is offering Rusty Pilot Seminars, specifically designed to bring pilots back up to speed when it comes to new rules and equipment. That can be the ground school for a BFR. I would say you want to get that out of the way and build a few hours in the system before trying for the CFI. When ready, I would recommend ATP. They get you all three( CFI, CFII, MEI) in about two weeks. I did it successfully there - and I had not flown for a year before I arrived.

Good luck!

Rotator
02-11-2015, 09:22 AM
Thanks to all for the useful and informative replies. I just flew right seat in a C-172 and could not believe how bad the cobwebs were! I felt like an idiot and could barely keep track of the comms. Getting back to an acceptable level of competency is going to take some serious effort on my part before I even think about being a CFI. Thanks again.

atpwannabe
02-12-2015, 11:41 AM
HI All,

Background: Former Part 121 F/O with COMM, INST, MULTI. About 860 TT, most of which is multi/turboprop. Left aviation a long time ago, but I am projecting an early retirement (at age 50) in a few years and want to re-enter flying as a flight instructor.

I haven't touched an airplane in almost 20 years.

Question: How can I get myself re-qualified in a fairly short amount of time and get my instructor ticket? Are there any flight schools that sort of "specialize" in breathing new life into has-beens like me? I think I need to go all the way back to the basics and approach this as though I were a zero-time student, but I'm not sure. Does anyone have any similar stories? How did you get back into the air?

Thanks in advance for all helpfuls posts.

I'm in no position to offer you any advice in terms of getting yourself recertified/passing a checkride or anything like that, however, I sure as hell enjoyed reading your post. :)

All the best my friend.



atp



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