Airline Pilot Forums

Airline Pilot Forums was designed to be a community where working airline pilots can share ideas and information about the aviation field. In the forum you will find information about major and regional airline carriers, career training, interview and job seeker help, finance, and living the airline pilot lifestyle.




View Full Version : VA benefits at different programs


Romeo Hotel
08-12-2015, 03:59 PM
Has anyone ever gone to multiple places to train?

After some digging, and the helpful information provided by this forum I found a program that will get me what I need with the least amount of out of pocket expense. FFTC (http://fftc.info/training-courses/) seems to be the way to go for me, but it culminates at MEI/Commercial.

In order pursue ATP I'd have to change training locations, unless I went part 61 with them. Is this feasible? Hell, is it even possible?

Got some solid feedback in my last post, hoping to strike gold again.


SeannyP84
08-13-2015, 05:44 PM
Most regionals will pay for the CTP course. You get your ATP at the end of your initial training at the airline. I'm currently attending the ACT program at Coast Flight Training in San Diego. Our school has you interview with at least one regional before you start training. You receive a conditional offer that is contingent upon completion of the course and successful completion of the technical portion of the airline's interview process. Essentially, they knock out the HR portion before you start training. Most VA students are covered 100% by the post-911 GI Bill, including their private. You graduate with an associates in aviation, PPL, instrument rating, CPL (single and multi), CFI, CFII and MEI.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

SeannyP84
08-13-2015, 05:46 PM
Also, it's a 21 month program, so if you start with a full GI Bill, you will have time left over assuming you graduate on time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Noguy
09-20-2015, 07:15 PM
I'm looking to use my G.I. Bill as well and only found TSTC in Waco tx. I'm really skeptical though because I've already been screwed over once on this.

Romeo Hotel
10-06-2015, 10:46 PM
Also, it's a 21 month program, so if you start with a full GI Bill, you will have time left over assuming you graduate on time.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I'm currently located in FL and trying to find programs closer to this side of the country for ease of relocation but I'd go out west for the right program. Housing is my main concern at the moment, even with the GI bill involved.

SeannyP84
10-06-2015, 10:50 PM
I'm currently located in FL and trying to find programs closer to this side of the country for ease of relocation but I'd go out west for the right program. Housing is my main concern at the moment, even with the GI bill involved.


Yeah, it's pretty pricey out here. Any aviation program associated with a public college is eligible for 100% coverage under the GI bill (as long as it's part 141)... For now anyway. There is a bill in the house that would cap the GI Bill funding for flight training, but it has a grandfather clause, so get in while you can!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

kingsnake2
10-07-2015, 05:15 AM
Have you guys looked at Tarrant County College's program at Alliance Airport?

Romeo Hotel
10-07-2015, 01:54 PM
Have you guys looked at Tarrant County College's program at Alliance Airport?

Thanks for pointing that one out. My main focus has been the new program at AB Tech in Asheville NC. The guy running the FBO that has the agreement with the college is a retired vet and has essentially designed the program from the ground up to be GI bill friendly.

Death2Daleks
10-12-2015, 10:42 AM
Thanks for pointing that one out. My main focus has been the new program at AB Tech in Asheville NC. The guy running the FBO that has the agreement with the college is a retired vet and has essentially designed the program from the ground up to be GI bill friendly.

Which FBO is that, RH, and who's running the program?

Romeo Hotel
10-12-2015, 02:15 PM
Which FBO is that, RH, and who's running the program?


That would be this program (https://www.abtech.edu/aviation) at AB-Tech with this FBO. (http://www.beyourowncaptain.com/)

I've got family in Asheville, which would make the move a little easier but they live quite a distance from the college/airport so I'll eventually need to move closer.

I have to say, I'm about 90% sure that's where I'll be headed. I'm still calling a few places, they're just a bit far for me. It's the initial move that I'm most concerned about.

Romeo Hotel
10-12-2015, 02:21 PM
Most regionals will pay for the CTP course. You get your ATP at the end of your initial training at the airline. I'm currently attending the ACT program at Coast Flight Training in San Diego. Our school has you interview with at least one regional before you start training. You receive a conditional offer that is contingent upon completion of the course and successful completion of the technical portion of the airline's interview process. Essentially, they knock out the HR portion before you start training. Most VA students are covered 100% by the post-911 GI Bill, including their private. You graduate with an associates in aviation, PPL, instrument rating, CPL (single and multi), CFI, CFII and MEI.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



I should have asked earlier... Which regionals is the school associated/interviewing with?

SeannyP84
10-12-2015, 03:13 PM
I should have asked earlier... Which regionals is the school associated/interviewing with?


Right now Sky West and Envoy... But they also have a relationship with Endeavor.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

hypnotika
10-12-2015, 04:10 PM
I should have asked earlier... Which regionals is the school associated/interviewing with?

Having been in your shoes, I'll bite and respond to your post in order to save you a world of ass-pain I went through in various aviation programs and dealing with the bureaucracy of the VA. A regional airline partnership is a nice concept but should be the least of your concerns. These programs only guarantee an interview when you meet ATP or Restricted-ATP minimums through building experience as a Flight Instructor. If you meet ATP mins, you will probably get an interview anyway..... at least right now in the short term.
Consider, the government pays 100 percent of flight training at public university/college that lead to a degree AND also pay your living expenses. You have the golden tick to go virtually anywhere in the country. Do not limit yourself to a geographical area and get stuck with a horrible flight school. Pick an aviation program that will SUCCESSFULLY get you to where you want to be as a professional pilot in the QUICKEST way possible even if that includes relocating. You will need to move A LOT anyway to get the jobs you NEED to advance in the aviation industry while chasing QUALITY OF LIFE.

With this in mind, I found aviation programs at a Community College with a QUARTER-term academic schedule AND own their fleet of aircraft to be the best value. WHY? In general, Community College flight programs will be 100 percent covered by the GI Bill along with the greatest amount of flexibility as far as course load, how you choose to fly, and completing certificates. With a quarter term, you can complete more courses towards your ratings and more frequency in accessing flight labs to meet aeronautical experience requirements. I would stay away from Community Colleges that contract their flight training to FBOs/flight provider; they are more of mom and pop operations have limited resources, lack of standardization, and high instructor turn-over due to low pay (i.e. the only multi-engine airplane in the fleet that needs an engine swap right before your check-ride and you wait months for maintenance – true story). There may be a lack of structure that will hurt your progression. For example, an instructor did not adequately plan to get a student to checkride on a reasonable amount of time causing massive delays with no assurances on any future date even though he or she met the standards (happened to me). Oh, the attrition rate at these Community Colleges are not great. You will also lose out on some of the big university experience. After you get all your certs, just transfer to a big university like I did.

So, my top three recommendations are:

Big Bend Community College (Quarter)
Northern Michigan College (Semester)
Cochise Community College (Semester)

For a complete list: https://www.faa.gov/pilots/training/atp/media/Institutional_Authority_List.pdf

P.S. After you get your certs. Transfer to a 4-year university (Florida) pursuing non-aviation degree. Something you can fall back on! If you are a CFI, you can teach on the side or fly skydivers on the weekends while attending school. My last advice is do not be in such a hurry to the majors, enjoy life and the college experience

uavking
10-12-2015, 06:50 PM
So, my top three recommendations are:

Big Bend Community College (Quarter)
Northern Michigan College (Semester)
Cochise Community College (Semester)

My last advice is do not be in such a hurry to the majors, enjoy life and the college experience

Hypnotika hit this right on the head. I'd emphasize balancing quality of program, maximizing GI Bill benefit, and quality of life. If it were me starting all of this over four years ago, I would have taken a long hard look at something like those three. A similar school that does things in house is Texas State Technical College in Waco and they have a pipeline agreement with Envoy if that interests you. I also wouldn't exclude going to a quality four year like Auburn where you can get a full slate of flight training, but graduate with a Business BS (The scenery is alot better than Cochise, saying this as a Cochise grad).

flyinryan86
10-13-2015, 10:01 AM
Most regionals will pay for the CTP course. You get your ATP at the end of your initial training at the airline. I'm currently attending the ACT program at Coast Flight Training in San Diego. Our school has you interview with at least one regional before you start training. You receive a conditional offer that is contingent upon completion of the course and successful completion of the technical portion of the airline's interview process. Essentially, they knock out the HR portion before you start training. Most VA students are covered 100% by the post-911 GI Bill, including their private. You graduate with an associates in aviation, PPL, instrument rating, CPL (single and multi), CFI, CFII and MEI.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Currently AD looking at transitioning next Mayish. I've looked at Coast Flight Training, and while it's 100% covered through the VA (for now), your BAH is only about 1,000/month because of where the school is accredited (Iowa I believe) which may get you half a one bedroom apt in that area (would need a roommate for sure, unless you ballin out). Secondly, MEI and instructor for Multi is NOT part of the curriculum, so you will have to pay out of pocket for them down the road. Some programs include MEI in the curriculum (VA paid for) just want to clarify that. I may still end up going there because flying in SD has to be awesome, and I've liked everyone I've interacted with and talked to a few current vets in their program. If I'm wrong, please let me know.

SeannyP84
10-13-2015, 11:44 AM
Yeah... They just changed the MEL and MEI. I'm still getting it because I'm grandfathered in, but they did unfortunately drop that part. If I'm not mistaken, you can still get them using the GI Bill, but under traditional flight training rules with the annual cap. It is a very good school though, with very knowledgeable and professional flight instructors.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

flyinryan86
10-13-2015, 01:51 PM
Yeah... They just changed the MEL and MEI. I'm still getting it because I'm grandfathered in, but they did unfortunately drop that part. If I'm not mistaken, you can still get them using the GI Bill, but under traditional flight training rules with the annual cap. It is a very good school though, with very knowledgeable and professional flight instructors.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I'm sure they're a great school. I'm actually flying out there next weekend to attend the Sky West briefing to the students. I'm also looking at Florida State at Jacksonville's pilot tech program. MEL is included in the curriculum which would save me 8 grand or so, and has BAH rates that are for Jacksonville. Not sure where I'm going yet, but I look forward to the presentation next week. Feel free to text me if you like..would love to chat with a current student 419-779-3112.

hypnotika
10-13-2015, 05:43 PM
You have more resources than most civilian students. Go to a school that will lets you train in a multi-engine at the private pilot level. I would argue this takes priority over the MEI rating. Unless you end up teaching at pilot mill like ATP or at a provider that contracts with Chinese students - it would be hard to instruct as MEI. The reason is the many other instructors that are competing to get the prized ME time and not many students wanting to pay to fly the ME since flight training is already expensive. Yes, there are Community Colleges that will allow you to do training in a ME aircraft (I went to one) - although most will be restrictive or reluctant because of perceived abuse. Doing it as a private pilot is the fastest way to reach 50+ ME hours. And if you decide not to be an instructor, you have the hours you need. Heres what I did:

Private Single
Private Multi Add-On (To act/log time as PIC of ME)
Instrument in Multi (build ME-time here)
Commercial Multi (build ME-time here)
Commercial Single Add-on

Renting a complex aircraft with retractable gear was almost as much as multi-engine aircraft anyway at my flight school. It made more sense to fly the ME and using a bit more of your flight lab funds because you CAN with the GI Bill and you need it anyway. Once you get your Commercial Multi, you can do you Single-Engine add-on in a fixed gear since you demonstrated complex operations in the multi. This is where you save money in your flight lab. There is always the option of transferring to another Community College during the Summer term just doing your MEI there (like Northern Michigan College) - ensure you don't finish your degree or leave one class at you parent school to finish at NMC which you can transfer credits back and graduate. Most community college will have flexible admissions especially during the Summer time. Its YOUR benefits, so you can plan and use it as long as it leads to a degree.

Believe me, by doing this you will have a lot more flexibility with planning your career because you are not chasing ME time.

hypnotika
10-13-2015, 06:26 PM
For you Active-Duty guys. Do yourself a favor and finish your General Education requirements now with TA. CLEP and DSST exams (free for military) too... so you don't have do worry about it while flight training. This eases your course load, allows you to finish faster, as well as focus on flying. Also means more free time to chase the college ladies or drink beer or have fun while in college aside from your studies.

flyinryan86
10-13-2015, 06:29 PM
For you Active-Duty guys. Do yourself a favor and finish your General Education requirements now with TA. CLEP and DSST exams (free for military) too... so you don't have do worry about it while flight training. This eases your course load and allows you to focus on flying.

I already have a bachelor's degree (currently an officer) just looking to get as much of flight school paid for by the VA since I earned the GI Bill by having 8 years of service. I understand that I may need to come out of pocket for some things, and that the VA will basically pay for everything (for now) if I'm pursuing at least an associates degree. I'm not looking to attend multiple schools, just looking for the right one that fits the basic requirements to start building hours, understanding that 20/hr is the best you'll find for CFI jobs.

hypnotika
10-13-2015, 06:58 PM
I would recommend a proven and structured program. Since you have a bachelors I would look at 4-year university like Arizona State University and their partnership with ATP. ATP has a fleet of multi-engine aircraft you will be able to fly and probably teach if you make it through the pipeline. ATP is a well known pilot mill and their course is well structured to get people through. More than likely your GenEd courses will transfer over as well. Pheonix is an awesome area with great weather.

flyinryan86
10-14-2015, 06:17 AM
I would recommend a proven and structured program. Since you have a bachelors I would look at 4-year university like Arizona State University and their partnership with ATP. ATP has a fleet of multi-engine aircraft you will be able to fly and probably teach if you make it through the pipeline. ATP is a well known pilot mill and their course is well structured to get people through. More than likely your GenEd courses will transfer over as well. Pheonix is an awesome area with great weather.

If I were much younger and didn't have a bachelors degree I would heavily consider ASU. Right now it's between CIA (part of Santa Barbara Business College) which offers a 70 week associates which gets me all my ratings to include MEI and the program at Florida State Jacksonville. What I liked about CIA in addition to its location (Ventura, CA) was that it's aligned with Sky West's Cadet Program which looks promising. Both programs should be completely funded by the VA

hypnotika
10-14-2015, 09:30 AM
Nothing wrong with SBBC... its a new program and unproven. I am from that neck of the woods. Appears to be a private institution; I would double check how your GI Bill is being applied. I may have old information but the only public college with an fixed-wing aviation program is Orange Coast Community College (not a great program) last time I looked for an aviation program in CA; which was non-existent. Well, good luck and hope you don't get burnt out as a CFI in a couple months then decide on a career change. It seems like you are already vested in getting an aviation associates. Unsure what an associates can do for you since you have a bachelors (unless you want to qualify for a Restricted ATP). Lets play devils advocate for a moment and say you go to ASU/ATP or something similar... proven structure with a huge fleet, then only concentrate on getting your certs and taking aviation class while saying you're pursuing a degree. Nothing wrong with changing your mind and opting out of get a degree (since you already have one). You may even finish in far less time or same as 70 weeks.

As far as SkyWest pathway... I would argue there are far better jobs out there than working close to minimum wage with a crappy schedule at a Regional and sucking life because Quality of Living is low. Encourage you checked out SurfAir, BeaconAir (Dynamic), Boutique Air, Air Ambulance, Fractional 91K, Cirrus 135/91, or even CapeAir..... but hey its your decision Sir

flyinryan86
10-14-2015, 12:12 PM
Nothing wrong with SBBC... its a new program and unproven. I am from that neck of the woods. Appears to be a private institution; I would double check how your GI Bill is being applied. I may have old information but the only public college with an fixed-wing aviation program is Orange Coast Community College (not a great program) last time I looked for an aviation program in CA; which was non-existent. Well, good luck and hope you don't get burnt out as a CFI in a couple months then decide on a career change. It seems like you are already vested in getting an aviation associates. Unsure what an associates can do for you since you have a bachelors (unless you want to qualify for a Restricted ATP). Lets play devils advocate for a moment and say you go to ASU/ATP or something similar... proven structure with a huge fleet, then only concentrate on getting your certs and taking aviation class while saying you're pursuing a degree. Nothing wrong with changing your mind and opting out of get a degree (since you already have one). You may even finish in far less time or same as 70 weeks.

As far as SkyWest pathway... I would argue there are far better jobs out there than working close to minimum wage with a crappy schedule at a Regional and sucking life because Quality of Living is low. Encourage you checked out SurfAir, BeaconAir (Dynamic), Boutique Air, Air Ambulance, Fractional 91K, Cirrus 135/91, or even CapeAir..... but hey its your decision Sir

Ultimately my dream is to fly for one of the majors (like everyone else I know). I am only interested in the AS degree from wherever because my understanding is the VA will cover it because it's going toward a degree (pilot technology, what have you). Going to one of the pilot mills, while great training and expedient, will put me 60k in debt with only a reserve paycheck (if that) to pay back loans once I start making poverty wages as a CFI to build up hours before applying to a regional. Also, having a living stipend based upon where the school is located is a nice perk too. (E5 w/ BAH rates).

TheWeatherman
10-14-2015, 01:43 PM
I already have a bachelor's degree (currently an officer) just looking to get as much of flight school paid for by the VA since I earned the GI Bill by having 8 years of service. I understand that I may need to come out of pocket for some things, and that the VA will basically pay for everything (for now) if I'm pursuing at least an associates degree. I'm not looking to attend multiple schools, just looking for the right one that fits the basic requirements to start building hours, understanding that 20/hr is the best you'll find for CFI jobs.
That's good, you'll get credit for all the Gen Ed courses. You'll just have to take a few courses that are required for your Aeronautics associates degree like Aerodynamics, Systems, Aviation Weather, etc. They are a piece of cake.

Romeo Hotel
10-14-2015, 02:50 PM
For you Active-Duty guys. Do yourself a favor and finish your General Education requirements now with TA. CLEP and DSST exams (free for military) too... so you don't have do worry about it while flight training. This eases your course load, allows you to finish faster, as well as focus on flying. Also means more free time to chase the college ladies or drink beer or have fun while in college aside from your studies.

This is where I'm running in to trouble. Since I already have undergrad degrees, I'm going to be receiving less VA money for housing. Most community colleges rate the aviation courses in such a way that you can't stack them to double up. Honestly, it makes sense. You can't work on one rating without obtaining the previous, but it really puts me in a bind financially.

Not only will it be difficult to enroll as a full time student, since the gen ed classes transfer, but I'm limited by the term breaks (summer/spring/etc) which further reduces or completely stops housing allowance.

If I could find a program that would let me train 365 with no breaks, I'd sign up tomorrow and send them my COE by close of business.


It's why I'm torn over the right direction. While obtaining R-ATP seems to be the prudent thing to do, I'll be slowed down by the college's pace. The alternative of obtaining ratings via part 141 without college backing offers less coverage cash wise, and may be equally slowed down due to the additional work schedule I'd have to endure.


Sorry for the gap in responses. Active duty + shift work = no life.

hypnotika
10-14-2015, 03:09 PM
Ultimately my dream is to fly for one of the majors (like everyone else I know). I am only interested in the AS degree from wherever because my understanding is the VA will cover it because it's going toward a degree (pilot technology, what have you). Going to one of the pilot mills, while great training and expedient, will put me 60k in debt with only a reserve paycheck (if that) to pay back loans once I start making poverty wages as a CFI to build up hours before applying to a regional. Also, having a living stipend based upon where the school is located is a nice perk too. (E5 w/ BAH rates).

The GI Bill covers 100 hundred percent of flight training if pursuing a degree at essentially any public institution. Unless things have changed, ASU contracts to ATP as a flight provider (there is your work around for not having to go to ATP directly and shell out money). So you go to ASU and ATP program provides the flight training. If you change your mind and switch degrees later... you can do this without penalty. As far as the VA is concerned, you have 36 months to get a degree; frankly, they don't care how you go about it.

hypnotika
10-14-2015, 03:36 PM
This is where I'm running in to trouble. Since I already have undergrad degrees, I'm going to be receiving less VA money for housing.

I don't understand this. Your BAH rate is E5 w/ dependents for a zipcode. This doesn't change as long as you are using benefits and are 100 percent. Did you already get a 4-year degree with the GI bill?

Term breaks are inevitable. For heaven sake, you get $1200+ in BAH a month to cover living expenses and get book money while pursuing a degree. You can't budget that? How about go on a vacation with your significant other on that trip you never had time to do or take a break to go fishing/camping if you don't have a significant other. There is always the options to go to CAMI in Oklahoma City and knock out high altitude endorsement with the FAA for FREE. Or travel to your FSDO and get your Ground Instructor Cert after completing the knowledge exams during a school break. Or visit that big university to transfer to and pursue a non-aviation related degree (highly recommend if you don't have a bachelors)..... the list goes on.

Yes, you can complete flight training on a somewhat accelerated scheme if you have drive and commitment to do so. I did it and I am not even the smartest guy on the block. Private to Commercial in three terms; skip Winter term due to weather and focus on GenEd (unless you train in AZ/FL) Private during Spring quarter term, Instrument in Summer quarter, Commercial in Fall quarter. Notice I said Quarter-terms inferring colleges typically on the West side of the country. Thats only 8-9 month and I found it to be a relaxed schedule.

My previous community college allowed us to take a max of two (2) flight labs a quarter term. This was a significant pot of money usually associated with Part 141 training that we could use on renting any aircraft in the fleet to train towards our certs. However, the school is not on the restricted-ATP list. I wasn't going to get an aviation degree anyway, and moved on to greener pastures afterwards. I don't care about having it at this point in my career.

Romeo Hotel
10-14-2015, 03:45 PM
I don't understand this. Your BAH rate is E5 w/ dependent for a zipcode. This doesn't change as long as you are using benefits and are 100 percent. Did you already get a 4-year degree with the GI bill?


That's the rub. You have to be enrolled as a full time student to get the FULL housing allowance. With gen ed courses knocked out, and the VA not covering courses outside degree paths, this would reduce my course load to less than 12 credits a semester. At most, I'd be 75% rate and some semesters only 50%. Being AT 50% means no BAH. 51% and above is the only way to qualify for the housing stipend.

I'll have the courses paid for in full, but the housing allowance would fluctuate each semester. That school out in AZ though looks to only use 1 gen ed class a semester. That's a huge benefit over some of the other programs I've looked at. If I could keep each semester at 75% I think I could make that work easily.

hypnotika
10-14-2015, 03:54 PM
I had the same issue. The work around is to double major in a second degree RELATED to aviation which will be 100 percent covered. Yes, you can do this - ask the VA rep. I picked a business degree because I said I wanted to "go into the aviation business." This allows you to reach the 12 credits you need by taking business courses. Any second degree would work if you can justify it... biology and aviation = Wildlife Biologist dumping fish in lakes from an airplane. Geology and aviation = Aerial Surveying. Engineering and aviation = Flight Test pilot. Computer Science and aviation = Working for Garmin as a programmer for aviation GPS software integration. Criminal justice and aviation = Sheriffs Pilot. That will also help you when you pursue that non-aviation degree later (for those that don't have it).

If the VA rep doesn't believe you, show them:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/417230900

TIP: Take as much online classes as you can, have your flight lab done "on-campus". This allows you to get full BAH and prevents scheduling conflicts. Greater flexibility in training, like flying at night or cross-country and not worrying about coming back for class.

Romeo Hotel
10-14-2015, 03:57 PM
I had the same issue. The work around is the double major in a second degree related to aviation. Yes, you can do this - ask the VA rep. I picked a business degree because I said I wanted to "go into the aviation business." This allows you to reach the 12 credits you need by taking business courses. Any second degree would work if you justify it... biology and aviation = Wildlife Biologist dumping fish in lakes from an airplane. Geology and aviation - Aerial Surveying. Engineering and aviation = Flight Test pilot

I... Wow... That thought hadn't occurred to me at all. That's effing brilliant.

I've got a meeting with a VA coordinator on base next week. I'm definitely going to throw this at them and see what's up. I owe you a beer.

hypnotika
10-14-2015, 04:33 PM
Oh, lets say you do finish your Private through Commercial cert between Spring-Fall quarter... its right about time for Aerial Surveying season in November (SkyLens/AirAmerica) or drop zones hiring Jump Pilots when the weather warms in March. Great opportunity to fly for these operators and getting some money/experience while taking classes online towards that non-aviation degree :). Then, doing CFI in the Summer or Fall following year if your heart desires. You can even start submitting applications to a big university after that and already be sitting pretty!

flyinryan86
10-15-2015, 07:29 AM
Oh, lets say you do finish your Private through Commercial cert between Spring-Fall quarter... its right about time for Aerial Surveying season in November (SkyLens/AirAmerica) or drop zones hiring Jump Pilots when the weather warms in March. Great opportunity to fly for these operators and getting some money/experience while taking classes online towards that non-aviation degree :). Then, doing CFI in the Summer or Fall following year if your heart desires. You can even start submitting applications to a big university after that and already be sitting pretty!

BRILLIANT! definitely going to look at an AS in business or AV MGMT so that I can get a full course load and max GI Bill benefits. Hopefully the VA lets me do what I want.

TheWeatherman
10-15-2015, 04:01 PM
That's the rub. You have to be enrolled as a full time student to get the FULL housing allowance. With gen ed courses knocked out, and the VA not covering courses outside degree paths, this would reduce my course load to less than 12 credits a semester. At most, I'd be 75% rate and some semesters only 50%. Being AT 50% means no BAH. 51% and above is the only way to qualify for the housing stipend.

I'll have the courses paid for in full, but the housing allowance would fluctuate each semester. That school out in AZ though looks to only use 1 gen ed class a semester. That's a huge benefit over some of the other programs I've looked at. If I could keep each semester at 75% I think I could make that work easily.
I see what you're trying to get at here. Although, you will still have a semester or two where you will be full time when you combine your flying and aeronautics course. I don't have to take any gen ed classes (I have a Masters in Meteorology) but I will have 13 credits this semester and 12 credits next (my final) semester. I will get everything done in three semesters up to CFI and MEI (I had my private before I started). Only my first semester did I have less than a full time work load. I had 8 credits and got around 60% of the BAH.

As far as getting BAH year round, good luck with that one. They will only pay you from the day the class starts till the day the class ends, prorated for partial months.

Romeo Hotel
10-16-2015, 10:56 AM
Oh, lets say you do finish your Private through Commercial cert between Spring-Fall quarter... its right about time for Aerial Surveying season in November (SkyLens/AirAmerica) or drop zones hiring Jump Pilots when the weather warms in March. Great opportunity to fly for these operators and getting some money/experience while taking classes online towards that non-aviation degree :). Then, doing CFI in the Summer or Fall following year if your heart desires. You can even start submitting applications to a big university after that and already be sitting pretty!


Thanks for the heads up. I'm open to all possibilities there, I don't care how I build the time, I'm not picky. I just want to make sure I'm getting the most bang for my buck with the VA money.



As far as getting BAH year round, good luck with that one. They will only pay you from the day the class starts till the day the class ends, prorated for partial months.

Yeah, I know it's a pipe dream but it's sounds like the easiest way to go to school and only focus on flight. I worked my way through college for my B.S. degree, and I really don't want that kind of stress again.

flyinryan86
10-20-2015, 11:09 AM
from talking to basically every flight school there is that accepts VA benefits, it looks like with the new likely impending policy changes, there is not way to avoid paying out of pocket or taking a loan for at least 20-30k, so I will likely need to stick around the active duty army another year to save $$ so that I don't have to take out a loan or a minimal one. Right now, as it stands, with my bachelors I will likely only be able to get 60-75% BAH coverage, so saving for another year may be smart. I know that's another year I could be building my flight time, but nothing is guaranteed, and if I'm gonna do this, I don't want to take out loans for an unknown future. The tricky point will be once I am a CFI working for poverty wages being able to float without the VA BAH, but certainly I'm not the first one who has been in that boat..building hours to apply to a regional. Thoughts?

flyingtiger
10-20-2015, 01:34 PM
I am currently using my post 9/11 at Auburn. They announced these impending changes to us back in the spring and basically told us we should start taking out loans or prepare for out of pocket because the changes are taking effect ASAP and there would be no grandfather policy. This happened as I was mid commercial, and now doing commercial multi with the threat of out of pocket that I was not prepared for coming into this program. Do yourself a favor and save as much as possible and prepare for the worst. Hopefully this bill will be overturned, but for now there is very little information being given by the VA and it looks like our free ride for flight training is on the chopping block.

flyinryan86
10-20-2015, 02:32 PM
I am currently using my post 9/11 at Auburn. They announced these impending changes to us back in the spring and basically told us we should start taking out loans or prepare for out of pocket because the changes are taking effect ASAP and there would be no grandfather policy. This happened as I was mid commercial, and now doing commercial multi with the threat of out of pocket that I was not prepared for coming into this program. Do yourself a favor and save as much as possible and prepare for the worst. Hopefully this bill will be overturned, but for now there is very little information being given by the VA and it looks like our free ride for flight training is on the chopping block.

Are you in their 4 year program at Auburn? In one year i can save 30-35 k from my job I think and that should be enough to get me by two years of an AS degree (assuming the VA still pays for more if it's going toward a degree vs just a 10-12 month flight program)

flyingtiger
10-20-2015, 03:24 PM
Yes, four year degree in professional flight management. It was designed to cover flight training up to commercial multi with a bachelors in business management. So everything is (was) covered 100% under post 9/11. I thankfully haven't had to cut into my savings in the first 3 years of school, and I live with 2 other guys, so I have a little tucked away that should carry me through. With the new bill, they would still cover all costs until you reach the minimum hours according to the FARs, as well as a certain number of ground hours, etc. But as soon as you hit mins, all flight training is out of pocket, while degree related classes are still covered.

flyinryan86
10-20-2015, 04:07 PM
how many hours did it take you to get your PPL?

flyingtiger
10-20-2015, 06:58 PM
About 70 hours. Could probably shave a few hours off of that, since with full government funding I was able to take my sweet time perfecting things. But even burning through it fast, you should reasonably expect to be around 60 hours. 61.109 puts minimum hours at 40, so that's what the VA is going by, as best as I currently understand.

Fonseca
11-01-2018, 10:06 PM
Most regionals will pay for the CTP course. You get your ATP at the end of your initial training at the airline. I'm currently attending the ACT program at Coast Flight Training in San Diego. Our school has you interview with at least one regional before you start training. You receive a conditional offer that is contingent upon completion of the course and successful completion of the technical portion of the airline's interview process. Essentially, they knock out the HR portion before you start training. Most VA students are covered 100% by the post-911 GI Bill, including their private. You graduate with an associates in aviation, PPL, instrument rating, CPL (single and multi), CFI, CFII and MEI.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I know this is an old post but I hope someone can answer to this. I'm still active duty, have 2.5 years left and I'm stationed in San Diego. I was looking to flight schools covered by VA and I just found coast flight and california flight academy that offer an associates, if you know of any other schools around the area please let me know, anyways apparently VA doesnt pay for the PPL anymore, I can pay it out of my pocket I guess thats not a problem, would you recommend me to get it from one of those schools or somewhere else for a cheaper price? And then My squadron deploys in a year and a half so we are gonna be going out a lot starting next year and I dont know if it would be better for me to wait and start all my training until after deployment, I was thinking maybe get my PPL before deployment if I can so that when I come back I domt have to worry about it, but also I was thinking about doing college instead and then do all my flight tarining togheter, but I dont know if those credits will add up to the associates to get a BS, if I do that I would have those 2.5 years left on active duty for college and then after I get out use GI BILL for my flight training. What would you recommend me??