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View Full Version : SkyWest Cadet Program?


marz7490
08-24-2015, 12:20 PM
Anyone going through it or have a first hand experience with the process?

Finishing up my PPL over the next few weeks so I am getting close to deciding on switching to Part 141. I've come across the SkyWest Cadet program that works with a few 141 schools and college programs that would allow me to finish my degree.

http://www.skywest.com/skywest-airline-jobs/career-guides/flight-jobs/#/pilot-cadet-program


Aside from these, I've always thought about the AeroSim and ATP's out there but don't think that's for me.

As always, any and all input is appreciated!

Thanks in advance.


rickair7777
08-24-2015, 03:01 PM
It's too new to really have much insight.

Going forward you won't really need preferential interviews or any sort of pre-existing relationship to get a regional job, just 1500-ish hours and a pulse. I suspect this sort of program is more of a recruiting/outreach tool for the company as opposed to providing significant benefit to the pilot.

If the program offers financial benefits, then sure go for it.

If nothing else, it would be informative assuming it doesn't cost you anything.

TheWeatherman
08-24-2015, 04:22 PM
All I see that is guaranteed is an interview. That isn't much these days.


RedBeardedPilot
08-24-2015, 05:10 PM
All I see that is guaranteed is an interview. That isn't much these days.

These days you're right, but this guy is only at PPL. Who knows what it will be like in a couple/few years when he is ready for the airlines.

I don't know much about it, it was coming up just as I was leaving 141 world. But if it doesn't cost you anything and you don't have to sign a contract I say go for it. You never know what the hiring environment is going to be like in a few years so doesn't hurt to have a leg up already

LRSRanger
08-25-2015, 01:41 PM
No contract and no requirements, I'd go for it. But since SkyWest is sending mailers to all the commercial/ATP pilots in the FAA database, getting a guaranteed interview doesn't mean a hill of beans...


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LRSRanger
08-25-2015, 01:47 PM
www.skywest.com/skywest-airline-jobs/career-guides/flight-jobs/#/pilot-cadet-program

Seems like some basic interview prep too, with no mention of contract. Plus you get a seniority number while in flight school. If you decide against SkyWest, doesn't seem like it will hurt you at all...


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zondaracer
08-25-2015, 02:23 PM
There were some cadets in my new hire class. The big benefit is that they all sat in front of me in seniority and got first pick for sims, and they are ahead of me for upgrade and vacancy bids. Other than that, no real benefit. If you know that you absolutely want to go to Skywest, the cadet program will be beneficial in that you will get ahead of your classmates in seniority.

marz7490
08-25-2015, 03:11 PM
Thanks for the feedback guys, greatly appreciate it! My situation is that I am almost done with the private and wanted to jump right into Instrument training.

What led to me thinking about all of this is that I see these 141 programs like Liberty University that work with local schools or even WMU, SIU, etc. that work with either their own in house training. I am looking at all of the various schools and comparing costs but 3-4 years for a bachelors, with necessary ratings and potentially my R-ATP at 1,000 hours it doesn't seem like a bad bet.

I realize that I'll only get out what I put into my training, I just want to go to the school that gets the most bang for the buck with the most potential for success in the end.

Thanks again guys!
-M

criticalaoa
08-25-2015, 04:01 PM
Not trying to hijack the threat but what about Envoys pipeline? You get free travel on AA flights while doing your CFI.

zondaracer
08-25-2015, 06:00 PM
The Skywest cadet program gets you flight benefits on Skywest operated flights, if you can get on.

rickair7777
08-25-2015, 07:15 PM
Plus you get a seniority number while in flight school.


No you don't. The people who were hired ahead of you would not be happy about that. Apparently cadets get the highest seniority in the new hire class, on the day they actually start class. You do not get a seniority number prior to starting new-hire class. That would be a huge deal if true, but its not true (because it would be a huge deal...).

LRSRanger
08-25-2015, 07:28 PM
No you don't. The people who were hired ahead of you would not be happy about that. Apparently cadets get the highest seniority in the new hire class, on the day they actually start class. You do not get a seniority number prior to starting new-hire class. That would be a huge deal if true, but its not true (because it would be a huge deal...).


Thanks! Things that seem too good to be true usually are.


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marz7490
08-26-2015, 07:45 PM
Extending my initial question a bit but does anyone know if your 141 flight training needs to be at or with the school approved for the R-ATP minimums?

I've seen schools like Utah Valley University that work with your local flight training but do the minimums drop for you or do you need to train with Utah Valley?

http://www.faa.gov/pilots/training/atp/media/Institutional_Authority_List.pdf

spikemath
09-03-2015, 06:44 PM
You should pick your school based on the cost of the training program. If they estimate any cost higher than $50K I would seriously reconsider. 141 Programs are notorious for running their students from $75-125K and the fact that they advertise a "connection" with a regional is meaningless. Especially if you spent more time and more money just to get it. A good part 61 can save you a ton of time and money. If you're dedicated you can hit all of your ratings in 6-12 months and be at an instructing job only having spent 40K to get there. Be wise.

spikemath
09-03-2015, 06:51 PM
Extending my initial question a bit but does anyone know if your 141 flight training needs to be at or with the school approved for the R-ATP minimums?

I've seen schools like Utah Valley University that work with your local flight training but do the minimums drop for you or do you need to train with Utah Valley?

http://www.faa.gov/pilots/training/atp/media/Institutional_Authority_List.pdf

To be eligible for the RATP your flight training needs to be 141, not just the college. Avoid the university training altogether, you will spend 4 years getting to cfi and 2 more instructing. If you want your bachelors go through UVU's online program and get your training done at a local fbo. If you want an aviation degree don't spend time getting a Professional Pilot degree, instead do the admin/business degree. You may lose your medical someday and you'd have a tough time finding a use for a pilot degree. Your flying can be credited towards electives.

Back to the RATP conversation: A 141 University program really does take 4 years; they will make sure of it. If you spend even 18 months getting to cfi at a part 61 you will have saved over two years of your time. The difference between the 1000hrs RATP and 1500HR ATP is only about 8 months more of instructing. You will still be done in less time that the guy who will be eligible for the RATP.

marz7490
09-08-2015, 01:13 PM
To be eligible for the RATP your flight training needs to be 141, not just the college. Avoid the university training altogether, you will spend 4 years getting to cfi and 2 more instructing. If you want your bachelors go through UVU's online program and get your training done at a local fbo. If you want an aviation degree don't spend time getting a Professional Pilot degree, instead do the admin/business degree. You may lose your medical someday and you'd have a tough time finding a use for a pilot degree. Your flying can be credited towards electives.

Back to the RATP conversation: A 141 University program really does take 4 years; they will make sure of it. If you spend even 18 months getting to cfi at a part 61 you will have saved over two years of your time. The difference between the 1000hrs RATP and 1500HR ATP is only about 8 months more of instructing. You will still be done in less time that the guy who will be eligible for the RATP.

Thanks a ton for your response. Seems like the cheapest route would mean sticking with my current instructor (Delta Pilot) whom I really like training with. I did confirm that the UVU Online Aviation Degree would not qualify me for the R-ATP even if I did train locally through 141. That being said, it wouldn't hurt getting that degree along with something else unrelated to aviation.

Still debating and researching as much as I can.



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