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View Full Version : 4 year University or mom & pop?


Flyjake7
09-29-2015, 06:18 PM
Hi all,

I am currently a freshman at a 4 year university in Ohio. I am realizing that part 141, particularly at this program and with Ohio's weather, is going to take a long time to get through. I am considering going back home to Virginia and getting ratings through my CFI, and then instructing while getting a four year somewhere in Arizona or Florida. What is everyone's opinion on this. Seems like this whole 4 year deal takes a ridiculous amount of time, when I could be getting everything done in less than a year back home, and for a lot cheaper.
I appreciate any feedback!


threeighteen
09-29-2015, 06:57 PM
get the CFI, start instructing, do school online.

Flyjake7
09-29-2015, 07:22 PM
and I should also mention that the university has a reduced ATP and a king air that they have an internship for once you reach CFII. Granted, it would probably take 4 or more years to get CFII...


LRSRanger
09-29-2015, 08:13 PM
Get your ratings, start building time! You don't need your degree till you apply to a major, start building time early! Do your degree online.


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eraualex
09-30-2015, 12:32 AM
Started out at Embry Riddle Aeronautical Science program but realized that this particular degree is as good as your health is. Decided also that it was too darn expensive to pay x USD per flight hour when you can pay X-70% at the FBO on the same field for the same flight hour where in essence you get the same license issued by the same agency (FAA). Changed my major to Aeronautical Studies in Aviation management, got my tickets at the FBO for alot less money and ended up using my management degree to start a non aviation career that lasted almost 28 years. Go mom and pop and seek degree program to keep you alive in case..............

Swedish Blender
10-01-2015, 06:36 AM
IMHO, do not do school online. Life is a journey, enjoy it.

You will have he rest of your life to work and fly airplanes.

If flying is who you are instead of what you do, then go ahead and do it online I suppose.

OldWeasel
10-01-2015, 03:57 PM
Take it from someone on the late bus. Start the career, get the seniority, retire young. Then you have more cash and cheaper tickets for your "journey". Investigate. There are multiple paths today.

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Oskie305
10-01-2015, 06:08 PM
What is the rush... stay where you're at, get your degree and get your rating.

METO Guido
10-01-2015, 11:19 PM
What is the rush... stay where you're at, get your degree and get your rating.
This is good advice. I have one and not the slightest as to why. No reason to think it had anything to do with where I'm at or how much money I made or didn't make. I'm still happy to have had it.

Oskie305
10-02-2015, 03:53 AM
This is good advice. I have one and not the slightest as to why. No reason to think it had anything to do with where I'm at or how much money I made or didn't make. I'm still happy to have had it.


Same here, degree in comp. science and on the side of doing my undergraduate I was getting all my flight tickets done.

Not sure why I got the degree but it has helped me in many ways.. And yes to the dude asking, you need a 4 year degree. When the application says "Preferred" which is what is posted on most major airlines now instead of required. They will pick the other person who has a degree over someone who doesn't. It's a no brainier just grab a degree in something. I have a family member who does hiring for one of the majors and they were very clear when they told me that.

trafly
10-02-2015, 08:10 AM
DO NOT get an aviation degree. This is priority #1.

Get a degree that will support you if aviation doesn't work out for you. The primary benefit of a 141 college program is the reduced hours for ATP. Side benefits include internships, etc... Downside is ridiculous costs.
There are some colleges that will allow you to major in a non-aviation degree and still earn ratings in their program.

But, you're probably better off going to a school where you're paying in-state tuition and flying somewhere on the side. Keep in mind there are 141 schools all over the country, not just at universities. The reduced ATP mins might be a big deal to some, but if you're instructing at a busy flight school, you'll make up that difference in 4 or 5 months.

Other than that, the best advice I can give is to not try to rush to the big, shiny jet and don't try to avoid instructing. Even if you don't being an instructor, it is time well spent. Gain experience where you can, but be smart about your choices. Ask lots of questions. Good Luck.

Flyjake7
10-02-2015, 11:52 AM
Yes I am fully aware I will need a degree for a major, my dad flies for UA. However, the aviation degree I am currently getting is completely useless, other than the fact that it checks off the box "4 year degree." I am considering leaving university, getting all my ratings at home, and coming back to the university to instruct while getting a degree that actual means something (non aviation degree).

Flyjake7
10-02-2015, 11:58 AM
trafly, thanks for the advice. However, why do you recommend not trying to rush to the shiny jets? Ever since I was a kid my dream has been to fly those shiny jets at as young an age I possibly can. That is why I am considering leaving university because it just takes so long to get all the ratings and hours here. Especially taking into account how the regionals are/will be hiring. I appreciate any help

PRS Guitars
10-02-2015, 03:05 PM
Hi all,

Seems like this whole 4 year deal takes a ridiculous amount of time...


Huh? Patience young grasshopper...

Get a degree in something other than aviation, and learn to fly part time while doing it. I assume your parents are funding this. If you're borrowing for it, then get a job, a degree, and cash flow the flying. It's not worth the massive debt.

And I'll echo what was said about enjoying college. Learn what you can (non aviation), chase women, drink beer, network. You'll end up well rounded and be more enjoyable to fly with on a four day trip. This will show in an interview.

Vital Signs
10-03-2015, 07:05 AM
The hardest part about what you are trying to accomplish is the 4 year degree....because if you stop to concentrate on "my career" it becomes exponentially more difficult to complete after you have gotten started in said career and life intrudes.

Personally I would knock out ANY 4 year degree while flight training as much as you can outside of the university....because noone cares how much you "paid" for your training or if you flew a cirrus or a c-152.
But I would train at a school that has a multi so you will be able to get hired there and then teach in the multi to build the time.

CFI Guy
10-04-2015, 03:23 PM
You mentioned finishing school possibly in AZ. The talent on the Arizona State campus is mighty fine.

This past spring break I spent a lot of time down in Mexico on several trips (mainly Cabo). My gawd! What I would give to be back in college...

Perhaps you are a little disenchanted attending DorkU aviation college. Expand your horizons. You will have a whole lifetime to fly planes but only one shot at being young so ENJOY it.

Romeo Hotel
10-04-2015, 08:06 PM
Hi all,

I am currently a freshman at a 4 year university in Ohio.

If you're hung up on the degree path to get to ATP with reduced hours, look for a 2 year degree program.

That's what I'm doing. I've already got a Bachelor's so I'm trying to get my hours asap. I got lucky since I found a 2 year program that my VA benefits will cover.

A similar path might work for you. A 2 year undergrad aviation degree with general education credits to transfer to a 4 year program later on while you're building hours.

Just my two pennies...

TheWeatherman
10-13-2015, 04:04 PM
Hi all,
I am realizing that part 141, particularly at this program and with Ohio's weather, is going to take a long time to get through. I am considering going back home to Virginia and getting ratings through my CFI, and then instructing while getting a four year somewhere in Arizona or Florida.

umm, weather is not that bad in Ohio and it is not really any better in Virginia. So if weather is the reason you are wanting to move, you are going to be in for a big disappointment.

I trained for my PPL in both Florida and Wisconsin. I had a higher cancellation rate during the summer in Florida then I did during the winter in Wisconsin. Sometimes "good" weather is really overstated in some of these locations.

hypnotika
10-13-2015, 06:11 PM
Weather was a pain for me as well. The best schedule I found that worked for an area with four seasons was to do Private pilot in Spring quarter (March-June); During summer, it was too hot during day so Instrument rating at night (June-Sept); weather is general good for Commercial in Fall quarter (Sept-Dec). Not terribly difficult to convince an Instructor to fly nights if its balls hot and he/she needs night hours. I found it much easier to access Class B/C airspace at night with a more relaxed ATC. Plus side, you will be able to get 100 night towards ATP mins.

Oh, don't get an aviation degree man! Plan worst case scenario. What if you lose your medical, or become un-insurable because of an accident or incident. Then there is always a chance of just getting hired and at the bottom of the seniority list but the industry tanked and you get laid off. You have a family and need to pay the bills. I bet a fall-back occupation with a non-aviation degree would come in handy

Besides, you will need a whole lot more than ATP min to get hired by the Majors.