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View Full Version : Commercial MEL vs SEL


ipasgas1
11-13-2015, 10:41 AM
I have my private sel and mel and have met the time/PIC requirements for my commercial rating in either. My issue is that my written test expires in January as work and personal life got in the way of working on the practical portion. However, I have the next month available to work on the practical portion. I have my own single engine airplane but it is not retractable. I have been told a couple of different things and would like a consensus.
First, I have been told to do my commercial multi first as it would be quicker and I would be less rushed. I could then do the single commercial in my plane without worrying about the retractable requirement.
At a different school, I have been told to do my single first, using my plane for the maneuvers (to save rental cost) and then the approach/retract with their Arrow. I could then move on the multi.
Any ideas as to which would be the better route? My two main concerns are my time constraints (which would be faster) and cost (getting multi first would cost more?). If it matters, I am in Florida so hopefully weather will not be a problem.
I have a little over 500hrs TT with 150hrs of multi and an instrument rating. I haven't flown much in the last year and it has been 3 years since I flew twins. Just did my BFR last week...
Thanks for your thoughts and advice,
Dan


PerfInit
11-13-2015, 05:28 PM
Answer really depends.. If you are motivated to get on with a regional airline, the sooner you earn your CAMEL, the better. The CASEL may not even be necessary if you can figure out a way to rack up 1000 more hours of flight time with your plane. However, you expressed that you have not flown AMEL in 3 years? That might be a factor in your overall proficiency and readiness to meet Comm PTS standards. Have a good debrief with a experienced senior MEI after a "multi-refresher" lesson. See where you are at and then decide...

V/R

gtflyer
11-13-2015, 05:54 PM
I believe that getting your multi first would cost less because instead of having to rent the Arrow for your checkride and then the multi later you could save money by cutting the Arrow completely. It's a whole lot easier to get your CSEL after your CMEL than the other way and since you have more time in the single then your single checkout will be a breeze.


dimondan
11-13-2015, 05:57 PM
You have a single and can fly that for just gas. Fly the twin, get the rating and do your commercial single as an add on in your own aircraft. Requires you to get a twin though but it then allows you to do all of the commercial single in your own aircraft.

155mm
11-13-2015, 09:05 PM
Check with an accountant but my understanding is once you have a commercial rating, all training expenses at the commercial level and higher are tax deductible. Go for the cheapest first then write everything afterwards off!

Tippy
11-13-2015, 09:39 PM
Check with an accountant but my understanding is once you have a commercial rating, all training expenses at the commercial level and higher are tax deductible. Go for the cheapest first then write everything afterwards off!

have never heard of this but doesn't mean it isn't true. Wish i would have heard of this before i did my CFI

155mm
11-14-2015, 04:44 AM
have never heard of this but doesn't mean it isn't true. Wish i would have heard of this before i did my CFI

"IRS regulations tell us that educational expenses may be deducted if the education (1) maintains or improves skills required in your employment, trade, or business; or (2) meets the express requirements of your employer or the requirements of applicable law or regulations imposed as a condition for your retention of salary, status, or employment (IRC Regulation 1.162-5(a)). However, even if educational expenses meet either of these two tests, they will still be nondeductible if they are incurred to meet the minimum educational requirements for your employment or if the education qualifies you for a new trade or business (IRC Regulation 1.162-5(b)2 and 3)."

AOPA has a link:
The Pilot's Guide to Taxes - AOPA (http://www.aopa.org/Pilot-Resources/Aircraft-Ownership/The-Pilots-Guide-to-Taxes)

I'm not a tax expert so consult with a CPA!!!

ipasgas1
11-16-2015, 10:11 AM
Okay, now I am confused again...I have been told that although I have my private MEL, I will still need 20 hours of dual and 10 hours of ground regardless of my AMEL and hours. Is that true? If so, the cheapest I have found is right at $6000 whereas if I do my CSEL first, it would be 10 hours dual in my plane for maneuvers and 10 dual in the Arrow plus the checkride which would run around $2700-3000? I assumed my multi time would give me a break from the standard CMEL initial training. I thought the initial part meant initial multi training...does it mean initial commercial training? I thought the multi commercial would be more like an add on so maybe 10 hours at most... Am I wrong or are they just trying to get more money out of me?
Thanks,
Dan

155mm
11-16-2015, 10:52 AM
Okay, now I am confused again...

You should read the regulations and not rely on opinions or a sales pitch! All I can tell you is the examiner has to go by the regulations right down to the minute and mile! The FARs may be boring but reviewing them is a good habit to develop!
eCFR ? Code of Federal Regulations (http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?node=pt14.2.61#se14.2.61_1127)

ipasgas1
11-16-2015, 01:32 PM
In so reading, it states only 3 hours of dual instruction in prep for the checkride but 10 hours of dual training in a multi which I would have received with my AMEL, correct? So I should not need 20 more hours of dual as this school is telling me...

krudawg
11-16-2015, 04:43 PM
"IRS regulations tell us that educational expenses may be deducted if the education (1) maintains or improves skills required in your employment, trade, or business; or (2) meets the express requirements of your employer or the requirements of applicable law or regulations imposed as a condition for your retention of salary, status, or employment (IRC Regulation 1.162-5(a)). However, even if educational expenses meet either of these two tests, they will still be nondeductible if they are incurred to meet the minimum educational requirements for your employment or if the education qualifies you for a new trade or business (IRC Regulation 1.162-5(b)2 and 3)."


AOPA has a link:
The Pilot's Guide to Taxes - AOPA (http://www.aopa.org/Pilot-Resources/Aircraft-Ownership/The-Pilots-Guide-to-Taxes)

I'm not a tax expert so consult with a CPA!!!

So does that mean, if I get my commercial rating and start a sight seeing operation( with rental GA aircraft) and that I plan to expand to flying 747's to Asia in the next 5 years then ......? So, I guess I need a creative accountant and a certificate to operate a commercial sight seeing business. Gee, I could sell my services to my soon-to-be-created
"Acme Real Estate by Air" and though I'll be losing money for the next three years (I think the IRS says after 3 years your business is a hobby and not tax deductible) I could buy a lot of training and ratings in 3 years. Oops, theres my alarm, time to take my prozac :-)