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View Full Version : CFI/CFII and MEI


ncpilot1996
12-19-2015, 08:41 PM
So I have my CFI initial checkride coming up next week and I was just wondering what were some of the special emphasis areas that everyone seemed to stumble across in the oral that was difficult to them? I am pretty good in the Regs department...I read it like a bible nightly... but I just want some outside opinions


Tippy
12-19-2015, 08:53 PM
anything in the PTS is fair game, the special emphasis items are listed in the front. FOIs are big deal.

bedrock
12-19-2015, 10:59 PM
A lot of people concentrate on the FOI's. regs and overlook the technical details. Like for example how to explain how a constant speed prop works in laymen's terms. The other thing is over-explaining; be careful to only answer what is asked; otherwise you risk digging the proverbial hole for yourself.


BoxedinIowa
12-20-2015, 06:19 AM
My initial was the CFII, but the inspector really only wanted to hear that I had some knowledge of how to teach a student; The FOI was mostly memorize and recite verbatim.

Like for example how to explain how a constant speed prop works in laymen's terms. The other thing is over-explaining; be careful to only answer what is asked; otherwise you risk digging the proverbial hole for yourself.

Not so much for the initial, but I think every examiner/inspector/DPE/etc wants to see that you have a couple different ways to reach a student -- Pictures, written explanations (out of your sources), and verbal.
If you can do that, and make good landings on the flight portion, you're golden.

ncpilot1996
12-20-2015, 08:19 PM
Yeah I'm pretty good at explaining things in different aspects... Like for every one specific thing I'm trying to explain I intend to use different teaching methods like say for lift. I'd give an example (hand out the window of a moving car, draw a wing with relative wind and show the different areas or use Bernoulis (spell check that) principle and the lift formula to explain it

JamesNoBrakes
12-20-2015, 08:32 PM
Not so much for the initial, but I think every examiner/inspector/DPE/etc wants to see that you have a couple different ways to reach a student -- Pictures, written explanations (out of your sources), and verbal.
If you can do that, and make good landings on the flight portion, you're golden.

Well, one way to say it is that "telling isn't teaching". Teaching requires engagement, methods, active participation, etc. If someone sits there and tries to impress me by telling me a whole bunch, it's not going to make me think they can teach. Likewise, if someone impresses me with teaching but has no substance, they may not know anything. It's a balance and most examiners/inspectors/DPEs aren't expecting some sort of mind-blowing teaching experience due to the limited experience of the applicant, but as a general rule, I'd always go back to "telling isn't teaching". When you get down the road and the only reason you know something is because you were "told", all sorts of bad stuff happens. If you looked it up, experimented with it, proved it, experienced it, participated in it, etc., you are far more likely to have a solid foundation for your knowledge. :)

bedrock
12-20-2015, 10:31 PM
Do they still require a CFI to know how to use the E6B?

ncpilot1996
12-24-2015, 06:30 PM
Electronic E6B is my friend...I mean I have a metal one and can use it but it's more of a paper weight, I prefer the digital ones

bedrock
12-24-2015, 08:35 PM
It's faster to do all the GS, FF, TTD, etc. faster on the paperweight!

Five93H
12-25-2015, 07:16 AM
So I have my CFI initial checkride coming up next week and I was just wondering what were some of the special emphasis areas that everyone seemed to stumble across in the oral that was difficult to them? I am pretty good in the Regs department...I read it like a bible nightly... but I just want some outside opinions

FAA or DPE?
Mine was FAA but the guy was excellent. Wanted practical knowledge, didn't expect word for word definitions of FOI, but how we'd integrate what we've read with how we could teach the material. They didn't expect a walking textbook, but someone who had a very good working understanding of each subject.

Ed Vorbach
12-26-2015, 03:47 PM
It's not the same as other check rides. Remember - YOU are the teacher now, so teach. Don't let it be a Q&A all the way - if your training was done right, you should have lesson plans for everything and should have taught most of the material. Be confident and professional. Refer to materials you have if needed, but don't overly rely on them. Someone above said - answer just what is asked - good advice - don't dig your own grave :) I had an FAA guy for my initial and the oral and check ride were simple - the PTS - inside and out. Have any and all AC's or regs referenced in the front of the PTS with you. They are all free on the FAA website. Put them on an iPad and it's snap. If you show up with you stuff wired tight - it makes all the difference. Good luck.

Austin Marshall
01-05-2016, 12:57 AM
Five93H, I think you have sufficient flying experience. One of my friends who is working at Las Vegas airlines have said the same thing while I have asked this when I have started my training. Currently I am pursuing my aviation degree for FAA license in TX.

andylewis1977
01-07-2016, 05:14 AM
My friend had his CFI initial a few days ago, and passed the oral portion. The more useful resources to prepare for CFI is PHAK, AFH, POH, FAR AIM, etc

JamesNoBrakes
01-07-2016, 05:38 AM
Do they still require a CFI to know how to use the E6B?

That has never been required. You are required to be able to calculate aircraft performance and do XC planning, but that may or may not require an E6B. As with most things, there's usually more than one way to do it.