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NonRevBallin
07-25-2016, 01:42 PM
How overtime has made L.A.'s port pilots the city's best paid employees, averaging $450,000 a year - LA Times (http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-port-pilots-overtime-20160725-snap-story.html?track=lat-pick)


Swakid8
07-25-2016, 02:14 PM
Yeah, tug boat pilots make a lot of money pulling boats in and out of harbors


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Aquaticus
07-25-2016, 02:25 PM
I know one that works in and around NY. He makes 1200 a day whenever he is called in but he is a "contractor" so he doesnt have taxes taken out, medical is expensive, and no retirement. He gets called about 3 days a week and it isn't hard to get the license but to get called for the job you need to know the right people. If you are a mope you have zero chance of landing these type of jobs.


Lvlng4Spd
07-25-2016, 02:45 PM
Yeah, tug boat pilots make a lot of money pulling boats in and out of harbors


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Sadly the cargo on some of those container ships could arguably hold a higher value than human life. What a screwed up world...

Swakid8
07-25-2016, 03:01 PM
Sadly the cargo on some of those container ships could arguably hold a higher value than human life. What a screwed up world...



Let alone those ships themselves too [emoji58]


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Reservist
07-25-2016, 03:02 PM
License isn't easy to get.

Yes harbor pilot make bank.

Job is very hard to get.

One of the few if only maritime captain positions that allow you to be home every night.

USMCFLYR
07-25-2016, 03:40 PM
When I lived in Virginia Beach, I had a friend who was the dispatcher for the 'pilots'.
She told me how much money they make (I believe the number in the article!) and how incredibly hard (family ties/connections, training, union protectionism, etc...) it was to get into that business.

Maybe I should have taken up sailing on Oklahoma lakes growing up instead of flying???

TalkTurkey
07-25-2016, 03:49 PM
This is thanks (no thanks in our case) to union representation and solidarity.

Twin Wasp
07-25-2016, 04:11 PM
Not really a "tub boat" driver. You'll notice the article said there are 11 pilots for the port of LA. Eleven. If I recall correctly there are less than 20 in New Orleans so for every ship entering or leave NOLA it is one of ~20 pilots guiding it. You about have to born into the NOLA pilot's association. Many third generation pilots. No way to market the career to tens of thousands with "shiny boat syndrome."

tomgoodman
07-25-2016, 04:30 PM
We have three pilot groups on the Mississippi, and one on Lake Charles. Here's the umbrella association which briefly describes their history and gives links for each one:

Louisiana River Pilots' Association (http://lrpa.com/history.asp)

Jersdawg
07-25-2016, 05:15 PM
My folks are friends with a tugboat captain. It is not an easy job and there are apparently not enough qualified guys out there. Their friend has been "retired" for probably 8 years but still gets calls to take this job or that job due to his extensive experience. Not all are home every night jobs though. When I was visiting around the 4th, he was called for a job in and around Elizabeth seaport in NJ, and it was a three week gig. I'm sure it paid some serious cash but that's a long time to be away from home.

Poser765
07-25-2016, 05:33 PM
This is thanks (no thanks in our case) to union representation and solidarity.A factor sure, but hardly the only. This is a very technical and VERY specific skill set. Good labor representation goes a long way, but there also being only a handful of qualified people able to do the job goes even farther.

Jersdawg
07-25-2016, 06:19 PM
A factor sure, but hardly the only. This is a very technical and VERY specific skill set. Good labor representation goes a long way, but there also being only a handful of qualified people able to do the job goes even farther.

Yep. Filler.....

Avroman
07-25-2016, 08:52 PM
A factor sure, but hardly the only. This is a very technical and VERY specific skill set. Good labor representation goes a long way, but there also being only a handful of qualified people able to do the job goes even farther.

And hopefully the numbers of airline pilots continues to shrink til we get back to the pay of our forefathers. (at least the actual numbers if not for inflation)

rickair7777
07-29-2016, 08:08 AM
Some harbor and river pilots have to be rated as captains for "any ocean, any tonnage". My neighbor is an ex super-tanker CA who retired to the river pilot ranks. Those guys get pay commensurate with a super-tanker CA since that's the experience they need (hundreds of thousands $).

I've also seen ex-navy chiefs with a small boat rating break into the harbor pilot ranks and make bank.

It does require significant skill and there's only one way to get it, large vessels are not just "point and shoot" like a video game as some of you may believe. They have to be maneuvered and manipulated in tight quarters using various combinations of screws, rudders, side thrusters, and tug boats. you could have 3-4 screws, 3-4 rudders, 2-4 thrusters, and 3-4 tug boats all of which have to operated individually. Currents shift and vary depending on where in the channel you are and the tides. Best analogy is probably landing a big airship. It happens more slowly than what we do, but if you get behind the curve you'll have plenty of time to watch and enjoy as catastrophe unfolds.

UAL T38 Phlyer
07-29-2016, 08:33 AM
Long story short: I got to spend an afternoon and night on the USS Nimitz in '91 in the Persian Gulf, after the war ended.

I got to take the helm for 5-10 minutes (Quote from my guide: "Want to drive a National-asset?")

I took over from a 19-year old E-1 that looked like the poster-child at a Clearasil Convention.

Results?

It was a helluva lot more difficult than it looked, and all I was trying to do was drive in a straight line. :eek:

Yoda2
07-29-2016, 08:59 AM
Just to comment on the thread title... There is no such thing as a tug boat pilot. There are tug boat captains and harbor pilots, two completely different things, completely different jobs and completely different boats are used. The harbor pilot boats, while specialized and durable themselves, are only used to deliver a harbor pilot out to a ship, prior to entering the harbor. Regardless, both are very tough gigs to get, though pay very well.

USMCFLYR
07-29-2016, 12:14 PM
Some harbor and river pilots have to be rated as captains for "any ocean, any tonnage". My neighbor is an ex super-tanker CA who retired to the river pilot ranks. Those guys get pay commensurate with a super-tanker CA since that's the experience they need (hundreds of thousands $).

I've also seen ex-navy chiefs with a small boat rating break into the harbor pilot ranks and make bank.

It does require significant skill and there's only one way to get it, large vessels are not just "point and shoot" like a video game as some of you may believe. They have to be maneuvered and manipulated in tight quarters using various combinations of screws, rudders, side thrusters, and tug boats. you could have 3-4 screws, 3-4 rudders, 2-4 thrusters, and 3-4 tug boats all of which have to operated individually. Currents shift and vary depending on where in the channel you are and the tides. Best analogy is probably landing a big airship. It happens more slowly than what we do, but if you get behind the curve you'll have plenty of time to watch and enjoy as catastrophe unfolds.

Here is a link to such an event:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0wCUort-74w

(didn't post the actual video due to some language)

badflaps
07-29-2016, 02:50 PM
I've got a 100 ton ticket which is basic entry into skippering, dinner boats etc. The only way into big time is through the schools. Maritime Academy, and strangely enough Texas A&M has a marine branch. USCG, USNA not so much. Start as a bridge officer and build sea time. (Sound familiar?) Anything local is family. Sewed up.

Yoda2
07-29-2016, 03:29 PM
Ocassionally captains are able to get lucky with their 100 ton ticket and snag a Superyacht gig. (Those officially start at 100 feet, though that's small around Lauderdale these days) Even though they don't really like doing it, the insurance companies will upgrade you, to a point, to command a slightly larger vessel. When it gets around a 130' they pretty much force you to upgrade your ticket to 200 ton, or as the case may be. The starting number/nominal for a Superyacht captain is $1000 per foot per year, plus Bennies, Etc. Of course anything is negotiable.



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