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Likeabat
08-28-2016, 03:38 PM
Current corporate pilot toying with the idea of applying at an airline. The airline application asks "May we contact your current employer?". It then states that checking no "will not automatically preclude you from the selection process. However, we want you to know that we will contact your present employer before a job offer is extended."

Thoughts from other corporate guys that are/have applied at airlines? I could see the CP squirming a bit if he knew I had any airline interest. (Honestly not 100% sure I really want to go back to the airlines). Not sure how this would affect future opportunities at my company, etc.

Check Yes or No?


MG386
08-28-2016, 03:41 PM
I was advised that contact probably would not occur unless I was mostly through selection process, so that I could count on an offer if they made contact. Either way it's a sticky situation. If that's the job you want, id say go for it.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

Likeabat
08-28-2016, 03:55 PM
I was advised that contact probably would not occur unless I was mostly through selection process, so that I could count on an offer if they made contact....

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk

That's good info. Thx


HeWhoRazethAll
08-29-2016, 07:53 AM
Any management worth their salt will recognize that their good employees are always fielding offers from competitors. Any boss who is unable to reconcile that is not worth working for. I wouldn't sweat it for one second.

TapRack
08-29-2016, 01:19 PM
Any management worth their salt will recognize that their good employees are always fielding offers from competitors. Any boss who is unable to reconcile that is not worth working for. I wouldn't sweat it for one second.
Ok, maybe. However, if the prospective new job turns into a TBNT, it's nice to still be employed by the one not worth working for. Having a family, I'd sweat that a lot.

I think the intent of the post, correct me if I'm wrong, was wondering how far along in the process you'd have to be for that call to be made. I was hesitant to check that box at first as well, but someone told me they were "pretty sure" an offer had to be extended before a call would go out.

Likeabat
08-29-2016, 01:58 PM
I think the intent of the post, correct me if I'm wrong, was wondering how far along in the process you'd have to be for that call to be made. I was hesitant to check that box at first as well, but someone told me they were "pretty sure" an offer had to be extended before a call would go out.

Precisely. I checked yes. Hoping for the best - however it goes.

Thedude
08-30-2016, 05:08 PM
Be careful.
I was almost canned from one job because NetJets HR could not read the box of "Do Not Contact".

Not all employers are friendly when they find out you are looking for another job.

JohnBurke
08-31-2016, 12:39 PM
You can't prevent a prospective employer from talking to your current employer, so unless you disguise or hide your current employer information, then it's not a matter of "letting" the prospective employer make the call.

If the option is provided, "may we contact your current employer," I always check "no."

That discussion, one employer to another, records check, investigation, etc, will take place at some point if we proceed with the hiring process, but initially, I may have applied to two dozen operators; I don't want or need them all calling.

Presently I do some seasonal work for an operator who is very good; the money is good, the aircraft are good, and the operator is one of the most desirable in this line of work. I've flown for several of them. This operator keeps people long term, and has a policy of never hiring an employee back who leaves. This employer looks very negatively on employees who seek work elsewhere, especially with a competitor. It would be unwise to advertise seeking other work.

It's simplistic to suggest that any good employer should have no problem with you looking elsewhere. That's not always the case, and in fact, frequently not the case.

While seeking new employment, even temporary, part time, or additional work, it's often best to play one's cards close to the vest until the transaction progresses to the point where revealing it to everyone is necessary. Don't be deceitful, but keep your business as your business until it's time to let everyone in.

Likeabat
08-31-2016, 02:02 PM
All valid points. I guess the other question is: Will checking "no" be looked upon negatively by the prospective airline? Or do they understand all of the points you have presented. They do have a note that says checking no wont automatically preclude you from consideration and it also states that they WILL contact said employer before a job offer is made (regardless of what box you check presumably)

JohnBurke
09-01-2016, 12:19 AM
All valid points. I guess the other question is: Will checking "no" be looked upon negatively by the prospective airline? Or do they understand all of the points you have presented. They do have a note that says checking no wont automatically preclude you from consideration and it also states that they WILL contact said employer before a job offer is made (regardless of what box you check presumably)

Checking "no" will not preclude you from consideration. It's a given that before the process is over, the prospective company will be talking to your present employer. You'll be discussing your present employment. Your goal at this point is to secure the new job, and to do that you're going to need an interview. Eventually your present employer is going to be contacted for PRIA or other paperwork and verification, but until you get to that point, until it's time to notify your present employer, until you have a good idea that you have the new job and you'll be accepting it, you should have no worries about checking "no" on the application form. Your prospective employer understands.



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