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View Full Version : LR-JET type rating


penguin22
11-15-2016, 07:51 AM
I've got a LR-JET type rating from like 100 years ago. Is that only good for the old 23/24s I flew back then or is it good for all the new fancy ones too?

Specifically does a LR45 have its own type rating?

thanx


BoilerUP
11-15-2016, 07:56 AM
LRJET also works for the 31/35.

Yes, the 45 is its own type.

Indyjetav8er
11-15-2016, 07:58 AM
LR-JET type covers. 23/24/25/28/31/35/36/55.
LR 45 is a whole other beast. I think it covers the 40/45 and avionics differences for the 75


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AgentSmith
11-15-2016, 09:30 AM
LR-JET type covers. 23/24/25/28/31/35/36/55.
LR 45 is a whole other beast. I think it covers the 40/45 and avionics differences for the 75


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What about the 29?

:D

PerfInit
11-15-2016, 10:21 AM
See FAA FSIMS for Flight Standardization Board reports (FSB reports) which will tell you all of this information (and more). Before you jump into the jet, it might be good to know if there are any differences training requirements..

dckozak
11-19-2016, 06:26 AM
Before you jump into the jet, it might be good to know if there are any differences training requirements..

You think?? :rolleyes:

As I remember (also 100 years ago) this airplane has a complete high speed low speed protection system. Many were killed in its early days, partly because the manufacture (and FAA) didn't realize the need for a robust envelop protection and partly because pilots were more cavalier about how and what to know before flying it.

A day in a sim would be good money spent!

badflaps
11-26-2016, 01:29 PM
I've got a LR-JET type rating from like 100 years ago. Is that only good for the old 23/24s I flew back then or is it good for all the new fancy ones too?

Specifically does a LR45 have its own type rating?

thanx

Sounds like somebody used their GI bill before it ran out.

Windsor
11-29-2016, 04:38 PM
Good luck finding any of the 20 series any more. They are all but extinct with the Stage III compliance rule in effect.
As for the 30 series, the 31 is very different than the 35. If you are going to be flying a specific model, get some sim time in that model.
The 45 carries over a lot of Lear similarities, but as stated before, it's a completely different and more expensive type rating than the LRJET.
I love the Lears! They are a lot of fun to fly. My favorite is the 31. Brake release to FL180 in 2.5 minutes!!!! Little rocket.

HPIC
11-29-2016, 07:01 PM
Good luck finding any of the 20 series any more. They are all but extinct with the Stage III compliance rule in effect.
As for the 30 series, the 31 is very different than the 35. If you are going to be flying a specific model, get some sim time in that model.
The 45 carries over a lot of Lear similarities, but as stated before, it's a completely different and more expensive type rating than the LRJET.
I love the Lears! They are a lot of fun to fly. My favorite is the 31. Brake release to FL180 in 2.5 minutes!!!! Little rocket.

Nothing like the 20 series...where you're fuel critical at engine start, and burn more fuel during taxi than at FL410!

Brake release to FL410 in well under 10 mins is impressive. I've heard of it being done in 7 mins, but not from any official source, so who knows. Not quite fighter performance, but probably the closest a civilian pilot will get.

Windsor
12-02-2016, 02:20 PM
The 31 would out climb the old 24's and 25's I used to sling freight in. Typically I would be level at 41 or 43 in about 15 minutes depending on weight and temp.

I love the 31. All of the fun performance of the 20's with none of the fuel headaches.

maybe1day
12-02-2016, 05:49 PM
I currently fly the 31 and LOVE IT. The fun thing about the 31 is the climbout. I happened to glance down at the VSI the other day and we were pegged at 6000 fpm with 4 pax in the back. That's what you call power!

727gm
12-02-2016, 11:13 PM
And LR60 is the other Lear type rating

Half wing
01-26-2017, 06:46 PM
The Lear 31 has been my favorite plane since I was a kid. I got a type rating in it two years ago but still haven't gotten to fly one. Anyone know how I can get a few hours in one? I'd even be willing to pay the full charter cost for a few hours. I'm at United so everyone who I have spoken to says they are only looking for full time employment. If anyone has any ideas please pm me. Thanks.

Hawkerdriver1
01-29-2017, 08:08 AM
Back when the dinosaurs still roamed the earth, I was a Lear 23, ( Serial #9!), 24 & 25 guy. I later flew the 35, 36 & 55. I operated the 40 & 45 after that.

In answer to the question about the 29, the LR-Jet type rating is valid. Not that it matters much because only 8 28/29's exist worldwide with most in California's Central Valley. Same CJ-610 engines but w/o the tip tanks.

The shorter arm in the 20 series always made engine cuts in the actual aircraft with a POI something no level-headed pilot would ever look forward to. The shorter wings in the 20 series also made Dutch roll tendencies much worse.

It was always interesting sitting in the school house during 30 series recurrents. That model was manufaturered with 7 different wings.
Centrury III, Mark 7, Softflight, etc....It was also interesting because the instructors would have to divide us into different groups with different performance charts applicable to our own aircraft.

FAR Part 25 made huge improvements with the Lear 40/45. Primus 1,000, carbon brakes, much bigger wheels, vastly improved wing, larger tail w delta fins, etc.

The 23/24 will always be the Ferrari for me followed closely by the Lear 40. To take a Lear 40 straight to FL470, always flying direct to destination with everyone else diverting around squall lines & thunderstorms was always exhilarating.

Tailwinds!

HD

Dolphinflyer
01-30-2017, 05:08 PM
Seems I remember a LR-24D climbing well at a 12K takeoff weight. (6K of thrust)
Then they added a lengthened fuselage. 3K of weight and called it a LR-25. Same thrust of course. We called the 25's pigs. Other outfits with 35's called them rockets.
Then they added 3K of GW to the 25's, added 1500lbs of pig fan thrust that died above 30K and called it a LR-35. Guys in outfits with 55's called it a rocket.
Small cockpit for big guys in the 20 Series. Always knew I could unpack myself one way or another after 2.8 on the Hobbs.

DALPTOBE
01-31-2017, 03:56 PM
It's only good for the following:
24/25/28/31/31A/35/36/55

45 & 60 are sep. types. Hope this helps


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Flyer49er
01-31-2017, 06:11 PM
It's only good for the following:
24/25/28/31/31A/35/36/55

45 & 60 are sep. types. Hope this helps


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Correction:

It's only good for the following:
23/24/25/28/29/31/31A/35/35A/36/55/55C

DALPTOBE
02-05-2017, 01:15 PM
Ok smart ...


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Flatbiller
02-08-2017, 05:50 PM
Ok smart ...


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He's right and you were wrong. Just sayin'

ZapBrannigan
02-09-2017, 01:40 AM
Best part of the 31 is the 2.5 hour gas tank. Best part of the 45 is a lav with a door that closes. [emoji23]


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