Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-08-2019, 11:34 AM   #1  
New Hire
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Dec 2009
Posts: 6
Default IPC FAR 121 vs IFR part 91 in a C-172

Does an annual AQP FAR 121 PC training in a B-777 make me current for IFR operations in a Cessna 172? I say this because part 61 spells out a 6 month requirement for PIC IFR vs. my airlines 12 month AQP PC. I know I'm IFR legal at my airline just not sure if I'm legal for general aviation. Does anyone have a definitive answer for this and any FARs to reference?

Thanks
B727CARIB is offline  
Old 06-08-2019, 12:26 PM   #2  
Disinterested Third Party
 
Joined APC: Jun 2012
Posts: 3,620
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by B727CARIB View Post
Does an annual AQP FAR 121 PC training in a B-777 make me current for IFR operations in a Cessna 172? I say this because part 61 spells out a 6 month requirement for PIC IFR vs. my airlines 12 month AQP PC. I know I'm IFR legal at my airline just not sure if I'm legal for general aviation. Does anyone have a definitive answer for this and any FARs to reference?

Thanks
You stay current during that 12 month interval by flying approaches. If you flew no approaches for six months, you wouldn't be instrument current.

Your annual training in the 777 counts for a flight review and for an instrument proficiency check, but if you were to not fly an approach for six months, you wouldn't be legal to fly instruments.

Your AQP proficiency does not replace the requirements found in Part 61; it accounts for a proficiency check, but you must still maintain currency. 14 CFR 61.57(e)(2) provides that the requirements of Part 61 do not apply to the pilot in command of an airplane under 121 when conducting 121 operations.

The instrument proficiency check required under 61.57(d) may be given by a 121 check airman under 61.57(d)(3)(iii). That check will be valid for six months, if you don't meet the recency of experience requirements of 61.57(c). In other words, if you take your proficiency check in the 777 simulator, you're legal in the 172, though you really should go get proficient in the 172, as opposed to simply having had a check in a dissimilar aircraft. If you don't fly instruments or approaches or holding for six months, you will require a proficiency check to fly the 172.

It has been suggested by the FAA Chief Legal Counsel that when getting a 121 or 135 proficiency check, you get a log endorsement showing an IPC t the same time. Most pilots don't, but it does show proficiency which may be useful when renting an airplane, and it's easier for the folks in the FBO to understand than showing them a copy of your 121 paperwork. If you can show that you've logged six approaches, holding and tracking of nav systems in the last six months, you don't need a proficiency check, and for the sake of the 172, it doesn't matter if it's been three years since your last proficiency check. If you've been maintaining instrument currency, then you're legal.
JohnBurke is offline  
 
 
 

 
Post Reply
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Part 121 Interview (aka street captain) emersonbiguns Envoy Airlines 4 02-14-2018 04:44 PM
I just failed Part 121 ATP check ride again dl1011 Career Questions 17 03-20-2017 02:10 PM
Part 91 to Part 121 Advice CharlesSpringer Career Questions 8 12-17-2015 11:09 AM
FAA to reconsider rest exclusion for cargo fl Zoso Cargo 69 05-28-2012 02:05 AM
Part 121 Regulation Question Yankee13 Hangar Talk 2 12-03-2006 09:13 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:32 AM.