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Old 05-22-2019, 06:37 PM   #1  
New Hire
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: May 2019
Position: L-382 FO
Posts: 6
Default Lynden Air Cargo New Hire Perspective

Thought I’d give some perspective as a new hire FO at Lynden about the process I went through and how the initial training is going. I flew C-130s in the Air Force but retired 10 years ago. I was ready to get back into flying but wasn’t sure where/how. I had a friend who was working at Lynden so got some insight and felt it would be a good fit for me. With no ‘recency’ many airlines/companies would not consider me. While I haven’t flown big airplanes in 10 years, I was flying small aircraft and my job was teaching C-130J flight sims. So was keeping somewhat active in the flying scene. I had done an ATP-CTP course and had my testing done but had not completed an ATP.
I had my first interview via Skype in December 2018. Knew they were starting a training class in January and was hoping to get selected for it, but was offered the April class instead. They offered to complete my ATP as part of training, so I saved $ by not finishing it up in January like I had planned. I never really wanted the airline life so was interested in the 18 days on, 13 days off schedule and that I could live anywhere. As mentioned in other threads, they will fly you from really anywhere to where your bid ends you up. Just pick a regional airport and you’re good. They mostly fly Delta to move you around. You don’t even have to live in the US but of course needs to be reasonable for needs of the company.
After submitting online an application I got called to setup a Skype interview. HQ is in Anchorage and there’s no requirement to go there in person. They won’t pay for it. It’s a very casual, family owned company. Think Alaskan casual! When my friend interviewed in person (he thought it would be advantageous) the first thing they said was ‘we don’t think you’ll fit in here’. He was in a suit and tie, they were all in casual. (he got the job) Interview was pretty basic in educating me on the company and their operations and them assessing me for compatibility. I’ve flown the Herc for 20 years so understood the aircraft and the type of flying. And again, I like the thought of being gone for a block of time and then home for a block. Not the short trips and having to commute to a hub or sit reserve at JFK or something. As a note, my stick buddy in training has years of experience flying around the world in smaller aircraft but nothing as big as the Herc, he’s doing fine.
Training takes place in Anchorage and Tampa. They fly you to Anchorage (Delta Comfort Plus if available!) for 2 weeks of indoc training. Standard onboarding company stuff and then beginning of how the company operates, required training and a little aircraft introduction. During training you will get paid the minimum ($83/hour x 60 hours = $4980), plus a daily perdiem of $45 a day ($1350), plus they pay for your hotel. They provide company vehicles to get you from hotel to training. After 2 weeks in Alaska, you fly to Tampa for 5-6 weeks of Systems and simulator training at CAE’s training center using Lynden instructors. The L-382 is similar to H models with -15 engines. So if you have previous C-130 experience its mostly a review of systems but the hardest part is learning how Lynden flies the aircraft, checklists, wording, etc. So, I mostly just have to learn that, my stick buddy working much harder to also learn all the aircraft stuff for type rating. Before we leave we will have completed our sim training, done our orals and FO evals for the company and then ATP(I need) and type ratings. All done with company pilots.
Then it’s back to Alaska to complete evals (landings in the airplane) and 20 hours of IOE. Then you go home. So for us, over 2 months away from home. They were awesome and flew me home for my daughter’s college graduation. Then instructor made up training for me on one of the scheduled off days.
Happy to answer questions on the first couple months of getting started.
FrmrShadoGuy is offline  
Old 05-22-2019, 08:09 PM   #2  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrmrShadoGuy View Post
Thought I’d give some perspective as a new hire FO at Lynden about the process I went through and how the initial training is going. I flew C-130s in the Air Force but retired 10 years ago. I was ready to get back into flying but wasn’t sure where/how. I had a friend who was working at Lynden so got some insight and felt it would be a good fit for me. With no ‘recency’ many airlines/companies would not consider me. While I haven’t flown big airplanes in 10 years, I was flying small aircraft and my job was teaching C-130J flight sims. So was keeping somewhat active in the flying scene. I had done an ATP-CTP course and had my testing done but had not completed an ATP.
I had my first interview via Skype in December 2018. Knew they were starting a training class in January and was hoping to get selected for it, but was offered the April class instead. They offered to complete my ATP as part of training, so I saved $ by not finishing it up in January like I had planned. I never really wanted the airline life so was interested in the 18 days on, 13 days off schedule and that I could live anywhere. As mentioned in other threads, they will fly you from really anywhere to where your bid ends you up. Just pick a regional airport and you’re good. They mostly fly Delta to move you around. You don’t even have to live in the US but of course needs to be reasonable for needs of the company.
After submitting online an application I got called to setup a Skype interview. HQ is in Anchorage and there’s no requirement to go there in person. They won’t pay for it. It’s a very casual, family owned company. Think Alaskan casual! When my friend interviewed in person (he thought it would be advantageous) the first thing they said was ‘we don’t think you’ll fit in here’. He was in a suit and tie, they were all in casual. (he got the job) Interview was pretty basic in educating me on the company and their operations and them assessing me for compatibility. I’ve flown the Herc for 20 years so understood the aircraft and the type of flying. And again, I like the thought of being gone for a block of time and then home for a block. Not the short trips and having to commute to a hub or sit reserve at JFK or something. As a note, my stick buddy in training has years of experience flying around the world in smaller aircraft but nothing as big as the Herc, he’s doing fine.
Training takes place in Anchorage and Tampa. They fly you to Anchorage (Delta Comfort Plus if available!) for 2 weeks of indoc training. Standard onboarding company stuff and then beginning of how the company operates, required training and a little aircraft introduction. During training you will get paid the minimum ($83/hour x 60 hours = $4980), plus a daily perdiem of $45 a day ($1350), plus they pay for your hotel. They provide company vehicles to get you from hotel to training. After 2 weeks in Alaska, you fly to Tampa for 5-6 weeks of Systems and simulator training at CAE’s training center using Lynden instructors. The L-382 is similar to H models with -15 engines. So if you have previous C-130 experience its mostly a review of systems but the hardest part is learning how Lynden flies the aircraft, checklists, wording, etc. So, I mostly just have to learn that, my stick buddy working much harder to also learn all the aircraft stuff for type rating. Before we leave we will have completed our sim training, done our orals and FO evals for the company and then ATP(I need) and type ratings. All done with company pilots.
Then it’s back to Alaska to complete evals (landings in the airplane) and 20 hours of IOE. Then you go home. So for us, over 2 months away from home. They were awesome and flew me home for my daughter’s college graduation. Then instructor made up training for me on one of the scheduled off days.
Happy to answer questions on the first couple months of getting started.
Just straightforward factual info without all the banter. Refreshing. Thank you for the share.
hav3atps is offline  
Old 05-22-2019, 11:15 PM   #3  
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Joined APC: Nov 2014
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Can you say much more about the interview? Technical or personality based?
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:25 AM   #4  
New Hire
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Joined APC: May 2019
Position: L-382 FO
Posts: 6
Default

No technical questions. From your resume and flight experience I think they are mostly concerned with validating your experience and making sure you understand how they operate, where, and what’s expected. I had done no interview prep services. They did ask some clarification on my hours because of how I listed my instructor time. But there were no hours spread sheet break downs required. Most of mine was easily verifiable via military printout.
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:46 AM   #5  
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Posts: 83
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Thank you very much for sharing you're honest nd most recent experience with this company. It was a pleasure to read this.

I'm not c130 guy but I do plan on coming to cargo at some point. Do they have many regional guys come into this company?
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:11 PM   #6  
New Hire
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Joined APC: May 2019
Position: L-382 FO
Posts: 6
Default

I don’t know the background of the recent hires. Most are not prior C130 pilots though. Just haven’t met or had a chance to talk to many.
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:37 PM   #7  
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Joined APC: Oct 2005
Position: SAAB FO
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I was called to set up an interview, and I had about 4500tt with most of my time in turboprops in Alaska. Unfortunately I had already accepted a job offer elsewhere.
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Old 05-25-2019, 02:58 PM   #8  
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Joined APC: Jun 2018
Position: MD-11 FO
Posts: 85
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Can someone share general W2 numbers for the first few years as an FO? I've heard, multiplying the APC numbers by min guarantee isn't totally accurate at Lynden.
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Old 05-26-2019, 12:03 PM   #9  
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Joined APC: Jan 2019
Posts: 5
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Shadow, thanks! I'm guessing they are a little flexible on their 5000tt requirement? I'm currently flying for a medevac company, and looking at possibly trying to get on with Lynden in another 6 months or so. I have about 3000tt, with 1100 twin turbine PIC, all Alaska time.
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Old 05-27-2019, 07:11 PM   #10  
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Posts: 83
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrmrShadoGuy View Post
I don’t know the background of the recent hires. Most are not prior C130 pilots though. Just haven’t met or had a chance to talk to many.
Well that is promising.
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