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Old 08-17-2016, 04:38 PM   #1  
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Default Looking for a few MX's

Hi All, I posted in another part of the site, but am looking for a few mechanics. My name is Max and am a founder of a site privatepilotstudy.com. Were a group of private pilots who created an online resource to help aspiring pilots aspects of aviation. We are actively looking for a few MX's who would be willing to volunteer some time and host a class or two and teach aircraft systems to student pilots. Please PM me if you are interested!!
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Old 08-17-2016, 11:18 PM   #2  
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My experience with private pilots, and most pilots, is that they're willing to tolerate learning the bare minimum of systems, but express little or no interest in really getting to know their aircraft systems and the mechanics of what they fly. There's a reason that most mechanics are dismissive of pilots.

Are you looking for part time occasional input, or more than that?

This is continuing education for existing private pilots, or a program for upcoming students?
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Old 08-19-2016, 01:57 PM   #3  
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You don't need a mechanic unless it's a Q and A session. All of the basics are covered in government approved publications. All anyone needs is a desire to learn. Most of the common items for small aircraft are covered in the AC43.13. Many of the 330,000 A&Ps have no formal training to begin with. Very few ever work the industry, so an A&P as a credential is meaningless by itself. I doubt that any experienced working mechanic will be willing to give away their trade but there are plenty of armchair experts around.
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Old 08-19-2016, 09:16 PM   #4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
You don't need a mechanic unless it's a Q and A session. All of the basics are covered in government approved publications. All anyone needs is a desire to learn. Most of the common items for small aircraft are covered in the AC43.13. Many of the 330,000 A&Ps have no formal training to begin with. Very few ever work the industry, so an A&P as a credential is meaningless by itself. I doubt that any experienced working mechanic will be willing to give away their trade but there are plenty of armchair experts around.
"Give away their trade?" Meaning what?

Aviation maintenance isn't a secret. A number of experienced mechanics provide online and direct counsel. Mike Busch may be one of the best known today. There's no trade to give away.

Those of us who are experienced mechanics and who earned our A&P and do have training, tools, and a working background have no qualms about sharing it. My experience, however, has been that few pilots express much interest in investing the time and effort to learn. Cover memory items, cover just enough answers to pass an oral, hit the aircraft limitations, and they're happy. For those, why would an experienced mechanic waste his time?
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Old 08-20-2016, 12:54 PM   #5  
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"Give away their trade?" Meaning what?

Aviation maintenance isn't a secret. A number of experienced mechanics provide online and direct counsel. Mike Busch may be one of the best known today. There's no trade to give away.

Those of us who are experienced mechanics and who earned our A&P and do have training, tools, and a working background have no qualms about sharing it. My experience, however, has been that few pilots express much interest in investing the time and effort to learn. Cover memory items, cover just enough answers to pass an oral, hit the aircraft limitations, and they're happy. For those, why would an experienced mechanic waste his time?
The trade secret is in effect whenever a mechanic happens to know something that the pilot/owner doesn't. That's the only way he can turn $20/hr into $200/hr. Anyone who likes to talk about technical aspects is not trying to earn a living as a mechanic. Any airline pilots out there want to teach a groundschool an instruct for free?
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Old 08-20-2016, 01:09 PM   #6  
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The trade secret is in effect whenever a mechanic happens to know something that the pilot/owner doesn't. That's the only way he can turn $20/hr into $200/hr. Anyone who likes to talk about technical aspects is not trying to earn a living as a mechanic. Any airline pilots out there want to teach a groundschool an instruct for free?
Absolutely untrue.

The reason that an aircraft mechanic get paid to do maintenance is because he's qualified. A person who lacks the qualification quite obviously is not, and cannot be paid.

You don't sound like a mechanic.

This site is full of ATP pilots who discuss flying, offer information, research, help, data, answers, and wouldn't you know it, right in this very thread ATP's and A&P's are responding, including those who make their living doing both.

Are you actually trying to suggest that an aircraft mechanic hides information and knowledge from owners for the purpose of bilking them out of their money?

The experience, knowledge, and scope of understanding of a mechanic far exceeds that required of an ATP. The wage doesn't, but there's a lot more to being an aircraft mechanic, including investment in one's tools of the trade, than in being a pilot. Your comments display a gross lack of understanding.
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Old 08-20-2016, 02:41 PM   #7  
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We have a different perspective of the industry. I have been a mechanic for only 25yrs. In the latter fifteen, half of the work has left the country or is being performed by non certificated help. GA has been cut-throat for as long as Ive been around. Pilots will feel the same pain when cabotage is fully implemented.
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Old 08-20-2016, 03:26 PM   #8  
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We have a different perspective of the industry. I have been a mechanic for only 25yrs. In the latter fifteen, half of the work has left the country or is being performed by non certificated help. GA has been cut-throat for as long as Ive been around. Pilots will feel the same pain when cabotage is fully implemented.
Cabotage is irrelevant.

This has nothing to do with sending work out of the country. Virtually no general aviation maintenance is done outside the country. It's done in place, in repair stations and shops across the country.

There's no secret knowledge which, if let out in a class or on a web board, would rob a mechanic of his employment or enable the uncertificated person to take the work. None.

Part 65 and Part 43 are very clear on who can do what, and what certification is required to do the work.

We're not talking about sending maintenance work out of the country. Why would you attempt to introduce something so irrelevant, save to muddy the waters? This is quite clear. The original poster is asking for people to participate in an online training presentation. That's it. How on earth could you attempt to segue that into maintenance jobs leaving the country? Try to focus.

What "secrets" are there to let out that would take away from any mechanic? I've been a mechanic for several decades. I've been a line inspector, Part 145 inspector, director of maintenance a couple of times, and have actively maintained everything from light singles to large four engine aircraft, helicopters, piston, turboprop, and turbojet. I've done fiberglass to fabric, wood to steel, electrical, hydraulic, pneumatics, antique to modern day. I can't imagine what secrets a working, experienced mechanic might be afraid would get out that might deprive him of work. It's a ridiculous assertion.

To the contrary, as a mechanic, I'll go out of my way to pass on to a pilot-owner or operator the best practices to avoid unnecessary maintenance, or to do their own preventative maintenance (or not, when it's not appropriate), and I very firmly believe that every pilot will benefit from a thorough understanding of their aircraft.

Likewise, as an ATP pilot, there are no secrets; there's nothing that can't be passed on to student, private, and commercial pilots, or that would in any way diminish the role or position of a professional aviator. It's to everyone's benefit to pass on experience, knowledge, and understanding, and to help others understand the craft better. It enhances safety for everyone, and that in turn pays dividends to all.

I can't abide anyone that suggests withholding information is the right thing to do. A professional pilot who is too busy to share with someone who wants to learn is probably too busy to be doing his job, too. A mechanic who is too paranoid to give others the answers to their questions they seek would never have my confidence as a mechanic.
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Old 08-23-2016, 02:52 AM   #9  
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All Im saying is, dont expect any real working mechanics to speak candidly of what they do for 50+ hrs/wk. Our backs are against the wall with nothing to look forward to. You will get a non working expert that has ALL the answers.
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:03 AM   #10  
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Backs against the wall? Again, ridiculous.

If you feel your'e unable or unwilling to answer someone's question, speak for yourself. You clearly don't represent a typical working mechanic.

Or perhaps you simply have nothing to contribute. Don't paint the rest of the industry with your dull brush.
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