Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-03-2019, 03:49 PM   #11  
Line Holder
 
Joined APC: Jul 2017
Posts: 71
Default

33 making a career change from Fire Engineer to Pilot.

Sept 2017 I had never touched a plane and I should have my CFI done this month (weather permitting checkride)

I am about 50k into training and bought my own plane for 40k to build time in. I work 24 hour shifts so I fly on my off days and will hopefully start to teach soon.

I did all my school through Liberty and a flight affiliate. The lab fee for the flight classes came out as tuition so it helped me with taxes and I qualify for the R-ATP at 1000 hours instead of 1500.

I suggest you do the discovery flight and pick the brain of the CFI while you are there. If it sounds like something you still want to do then go for it 100%. Faster you get done the faster you get a seniority number.

I looked at ATP but I could not leave my full time job to do their program. The Liberty University with the flight affiliate was the best for my situation.

I get what you are saying about the cubicle- thats why I have my current job, but the airplane (especially when I am in my own going where I want to go) is a new kind of freedom I haven't had since giving up my motorcycle when I had kids.

Aero Atlanta seemed to have their **** together. I was going to rent a plane for a checkride.

I am 6'1 and 210, but was up to 240 for a minute. A 172 is what you want to fly. The 152 with you and an instructor will probably be over max gross with an hour of fuel
VegasChris is offline  
Old 03-03-2019, 04:22 PM   #12  
Line Holder
 
Joined APC: Mar 2018
Posts: 35
Default

I am 28 and about to leave my comfortable $90k engineering job at a very reputable company to transition to full-time CFI in the Atlanta area.

My advice to you would be to take it one step at a time. Go for a discovery flight to see if flying is something you really are interested in. Don't go in there with any pressure or preconceived notions... Just have fun! In addition to that, go get your 1st class medical to clear up any health concerns.

If you love it and decide to start training, I would suggest that you keep your day job and find a school and CFI in your area where you could do your flight training part-time. Ideally, you want to make time to schedule 3 lessons per week at a minimum.

I got my Private several years ago, but dedicated pretty much all of 2018 to wrap up my Instrument, Commercial, and CFI all while working full time as an engineer. Started Instrument Dec-2017 and passed my CFI checkride Oct-2018. Be prepared to spend a lot of time studying, but you are single so now is the perfect time.

One might argue that going all in and doing flight training full time may be more efficient, and a plus for career advancement (seniority). I personally hate debt so I did not want to get into a low paying CFI gig with tens of thousands of dollars worth of loans. The part-time route worked great for me and alleviated a lot of stress. Indirectly, it was also a way to make sure I was committed to my career change decision.

I know how you feel about the cubicle... It is nice and comfortable, money isn't great but certainly more than enough, especially at our age. One thing's for sure though, it is not very thrilling and after several years it'll s*ck the life out of you. Just look around at some of the older folks who have been there for a while.

Give it some thought. Picture yourself in 20 years and ask yourself whether you'd regret it if you didn't give it a serious shot when you had a chance. If you're like me and the answer is a resounding "yes", then you will at least find comfort in your decision and know that you are doing the right thing for yourself.
Ecotone is offline  
Old 03-03-2019, 06:23 PM   #13  
On Reserve
 
Joined APC: Feb 2018
Posts: 18
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickair7777 View Post
In your case it doesn't make financial sense. If everything went smoothly, you'd be ahead financially in the long term but taking into account the risks and time-value of money it's hard to make the case.

You'd need another motivation like hating your job and/or loving flying.

But also need to consider the stability of your current industry, things like real estate and construction tend to be feast or famine. Some industries prefer younger workers, and you'll likely get your walking papers after age 50.
I certainly love flying and that is the motivation. Plus Iíve wanted to be an airline pilot since I was a kid. Donít hate my job (or love it) but the negatives are offset by the income. However, it is a sales job so not a long term guarantee like other fields.

The hard part is envisioning the first five years of the switch being in my 30s. If a career stall for whatever reason happened I would be kicking myself for doing it. My cousin was just awarded Capt at a major and thinks Iím crazy for not jumping in. Maybe soon!! Thanks for your input.
DanMarino is offline  
Old 03-03-2019, 06:25 PM   #14  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Mar 2019
Posts: 13
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecotone View Post
I am 28 and about to leave my comfortable $90k engineering job at a very reputable company to transition to full-time CFI in the Atlanta area.

My advice to you would be to take it one step at a time. Go for a discovery flight to see if flying is something you really are interested in. Don't go in there with any pressure or preconceived notions... Just have fun! In addition to that, go get your 1st class medical to clear up any health concerns.

If you love it and decide to start training, I would suggest that you keep your day job and find a school and CFI in your area where you could do your flight training part-time. Ideally, you want to make time to schedule 3 lessons per week at a minimum.

I got my Private several years ago, but dedicated pretty much all of 2018 to wrap up my Instrument, Commercial, and CFI all while working full time as an engineer. Started Instrument Dec-2017 and passed my CFI checkride Oct-2018. Be prepared to spend a lot of time studying, but you are single so now is the perfect time.

One might argue that going all in and doing flight training full time may be more efficient, and a plus for career advancement (seniority). I personally hate debt so I did not want to get into a low paying CFI gig with tens of thousands of dollars worth of loans. The part-time route worked great for me and alleviated a lot of stress. Indirectly, it was also a way to make sure I was committed to my career change decision.

I know how you feel about the cubicle... It is nice and comfortable, money isn't great but certainly more than enough, especially at our age. One thing's for sure though, it is not very thrilling and after several years it'll s*ck the life out of you. Just look around at some of the older folks who have been there for a while.

Give it some thought. Picture yourself in 20 years and ask yourself whether you'd regret it if you didn't give it a serious shot when you had a chance. If you're like me and the answer is a resounding "yes", then you will at least find comfort in your decision and know that you are doing the right thing for yourself.
That's great input. Congrats on your decision! I was under the impression that part-time flight training for real (as in not just for a private license) is not a true option. But you say it is?
glover130 is offline  
Old 03-03-2019, 11:32 PM   #15  
All is fine at .79
 
TiredSoul's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Sep 2016
Position: Paahlot
Posts: 1,817
Default

It absolutely is.
It can be argued that part time training gives you more time to think about and digest what you are learning.
Fly more often in the beginning though like 3-4 times a week and after you solo 2-3 times a week.
Other than that I completely agree with previous info.
Good luck and let us know what you decide.
TiredSoul is online now  
Old 03-04-2019, 04:30 AM   #16  
Line Holder
 
Joined APC: Mar 2018
Posts: 35
Default

Absolutely! As long as you maintain a consistent schedule of 3 lessons per week at a minimum, you will progress very quickly. Flying regularly is more than half the battle to retain knowledge. The part-time route may also be beneficial when learning plateaus occur. Taking a short break, doing some ground instead and simply getting your head of the cockpit for a few days can help your brain make the right connections.

Not to mention that you will be keeping your job, and your finances won't be taking as much of a hit. If for any reason life gets in the way, you will still have your job to rely on. Or maybe you'll decide that you love flight instructing and would be very happy doing it as a side gig. A good plan B is always crucial in this industry.

Good luck!
Ecotone is offline  
Old 03-04-2019, 05:07 AM   #17  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Aug 2013
Posts: 355
Default

Iím 34 and had a comfortable Engineering job earning around $150k. I left and started a full time 141 school in January and have never been happier. Should have done this years ago.
deftone is offline  
Old 03-04-2019, 06:56 AM   #18  
Line Holder
 
Joined APC: Feb 2019
Posts: 89
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by glover130 View Post
Hi all-first post. I'm a 27 year old single guy contemplating trying to become a pilot. Hoping to get some guidance here from those who are experienced and knowledgeable. First I'll outline the reasons I am attracted to aviation and then my concerns about making the move. Thanks to all!

I work in a cubicle. I would love to do something that gets me out and about every day I go to work. The idea of flying an aircraft gets me excited. Open air, see the world, etc. Many members of my family have been mechanics in the Air Force and for private airlines so I grew up learning about aircrafts and I've always had an appreciation for the industry.

Concerns:

1) I hate working in a cubicle now. Is a cockpit really that much different? Small space, not much physical activity? Correct me if I'm wrong. I'm also 6'6" and 250 pounds. I'm worried about comfort-level and regulations on that.

2) I have a steady, progressing $75,000 salary position currently in a Fortune 500 company. I will be earning $100,000 in the next 5 years. My retirement will be set if I stay for 20+ more years. Am I crazy to give that up? It bores me and I'm not passionate about it and I have trouble not taking work home, but it's not awful by any means. It's a good company to work for.

3) Potential income/job market at the end of training. I have heard horror stories about people coming out of training and not being able to find a job or having to take jobs paying $20,000/year. How realistic is this scenario? What could I expect coming out of training pay-wise? What about after 5-10 years? I was thinking about doing a program like ATP since they outline it all so well on their website, but it honestly sounds too good to be true. They are saying $50k-$80k as a First Officer at a regional airline with tuition reimbursement (which is good because it would cost around $80,000), and then the sky's the limit (no pun intended). Is this really true?

4) How would potential health concerns in the future affect my ability to work? I have a few health-metrics that are too high that I am working on, but at least I can still go to work currently even if my efforts are unsuccessful. Are there any health restrictions I should know about? I know the military is strict here, but I'm not really considering that route.

Again, thanks to all!
As for the health concerns, I can't recommend strongly enough how helpful getting that Class 1 Medical upfront. A good examiner will also make you aware of things to watch for going forward, "It's my job to make sure you can KEEP getting these as you get older".

I was worried that some unknown issue would rear its head and disqualify me from pursuing this career. Doc was like, "You passed, no issues. You're as healthy as a 20 year old." Before I could open my mouth to say thank you he said, "... a chubby 20 y/o. I want you to drop 20 pounds or we might be talking about diabetes and heart disease before you turn 50."

I'm 38, the first class was a huge relief to me. It was really the last obstacle. I'm stuck taxiing for the remainder of this month as I finish out my current commitments, then it's engines to full and full time flight training through the spring/summer.
JayMahon is offline  
Old 03-05-2019, 02:07 PM   #19  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Mar 2019
Posts: 13
Default

OP here. Thanks everyone. Wow-you go to forums for so many other professions and make a similar post you get a resounding "don't do it" or "i hate my job." Here, it seems most people truly adore what they do for a living. That is certainly compelling. I was expecting to hear at least one horror story about a bad job market/low pay but the looming retirements seem to bring a unanimous demand to the market.

Sounds like my next steps before doing anything else should be a discovery flight and the medical exam. I will look forward to completing those this summer!
glover130 is offline  
Old 03-06-2019, 05:56 AM   #20  
Prime Minister/Moderator
 
rickair7777's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Jan 2006
Position: Engines Turn Or People Swim
Posts: 23,497
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayMahon View Post
Doc was like, "You passed, no issues. You're as healthy as a 20 year old." Before I could open my mouth to say thank you he said, "... a chubby 20 y/o. I want you to drop 20 pounds or we might be talking about diabetes and heart disease before you turn 50."
Get into the fitness habit. When you get to the hotel at the end of the day, don't sit down or lay down, change and go workout. Then you can chill out. Can't work out with a min rest overnight, or if you get in at midnight obviously, but don't miss an opportunity when you can. Only way to balance out sitting all day.
rickair7777 is online now  
 
 
 

 
Post Reply
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Career choice crossroad need advice Hang em High Career Questions 8 02-01-2018 07:31 AM
Looking for some insight on career change C4006 Career Questions 3 12-14-2017 10:28 AM
Busted Checkride/Possible New Career Advice CombineCaptain Career Questions 28 01-25-2013 06:49 PM
Career Change to Pilot... too Old? SteveCostello Career Questions 36 12-04-2011 05:59 PM
Airlines and Work History, Career Advice blewis73 Career Questions 3 11-08-2011 01:53 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:14 AM.