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Computer failure most likely cause of 777 British Airways 38 accident

Old 01-28-2008, 07:49 PM
  #21  
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Yeah, could be one of those freak things. Especially going that way out of Beijing. Lots of very high terrain and very cold temeratures.
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Old 01-29-2008, 03:04 AM
  #22  
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Well, I was told flat put at an ALPA meeting tonight that my unlikely theory was way off and must have been fuel, something about the tanks being 80% water when they ruptured (pprune I gathered).

Sounded interesting enough and it gets the drivers off the hook, so I'm going with that.
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Old 01-29-2008, 11:17 PM
  #23  
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Here is the real story...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVMDkV5kJYk
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Old 01-30-2008, 02:11 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by ryguy View Post
On the 744 if we get low fuel temps we have to resolve the issue as quickly as possible. We can usually accomplish this by speeding up and/or descending.
I'm curious- does this work because speeding up causes enough additional friction heating of the wing to keep the fuel/contaminants from gelling? Or is it just speeding up in the process of descending?
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Old 01-30-2008, 02:34 AM
  #25  
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Friction heating is correct my good man. Technically you are increasing TAT (total air temperature).

Descending would not increase your speed, necessarily. Actually, you would decrease Mach #, usually, by descending. Not that that really has anything to do with, well, anything. These thing's don't change pitch angle much at all when climbing or descending, in fact the 777 mostly increases power for a cruise climb (opposite for a descent), and doesn't deviate too much off of 2 1/2 degrees.

Normally one would decrease altitude to increase air temperature, so the two thing's are unrelated other than they have the same effect on the fuel temperature.

Likely there is someone here who can offer a really good technical answer, but that's just the basics of it from my view point.
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Old 01-30-2008, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by TangoBar View Post
I'm curious- does this work because speeding up causes enough additional friction heating of the wing to keep the fuel/contaminants from gelling? Or is it just speeding up in the process of descending?
Yup, you got it right. KoruPilot gave you the rest
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