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Old 09-25-2017, 09:12 AM   #1  
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Default UND College student needing your help

Hey guys, I'm in an aviation careers planning class and have an assignment where I need these questions answered.

Professor said about a paragraph per question.

This would be a huge help to me.

Thanks, John



The purpose of this interview will be to discuss training at their 121 carrier. Be sure to include the following:



1. Can you briefly describe the types of training you received from the first day you showed up at your current company until you were fully line qualified?

2. What was the most challenging part of your training and how did you overcome those challenges?

3. At your airline, what happens if a pilot experiences problems with their recurrent checkrides or other checking events?

4. Do you have any advice for me regarding how to best prepare for training when I start my airline career?
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Old 09-25-2017, 01:07 PM   #2  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdebrey View Post
Hey guys, I'm in an aviation careers planning class and have an assignment where I need these questions answered.

Professor said about a paragraph per question.

This would be a huge help to me.

Thanks, John



The purpose of this interview will be to discuss training at their 121 carrier. Be sure to include the following:



1. Can you briefly describe the types of training you received from the first day you showed up at your current company until you were fully line qualified?

2. What was the most challenging part of your training and how did you overcome those challenges?

3. At your airline, what happens if a pilot experiences problems with their recurrent checkrides or other checking events?

4. Do you have any advice for me regarding how to best prepare for training when I start my airline career?


Go Sioux, I went to UND and first off they seem to be in their own bubble of how they think the airline industry works. They still spew a lot of crap like it's 2005. Any who,

1- you go to ground school. It's generally 4 weeks long. 2 week being to Indoc type stuff, company things etc etc etc. last 2 weeks is systems. You then go to FTDs and then sims. This usually lasts about 3-4 weeks. Then you go to OE, it's generally 2-3 trips depending where you go.


2- the hardest part was all in the beginning, getting your initial tickets. It took a lot of hard work and motivation to keep going. Having good support from yourself and those around you to keep going when you struggle it's key.

3- this can vary. If you totally struggle, ans you don't make progress with extra help, they might ask you to resign, if you need some extra help, Have a good attitude and keep making progress, they'll work with you and give you some extra time in the sims. If you do something really dumb on a line check, you might be pulled off the line and be given training, or sent to a hearing to discuss what happened. It really depends



4- keep your nose clean, work hard, study and keep a positive attitude. You'll get where you wanna get, seems like so far in the distance but enjoy the ride. Grand forks might stink now but you'll look back and wish you were back there. Good luck
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Old 09-26-2017, 06:45 PM   #3  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prex8390 View Post
Go Sioux, I went to UND and first off they seem to be in their own bubble of how they think the airline industry works. They still spew a lot of crap like it's 2005. Any who,

1- you go to ground school. It's generally 4 weeks long. 2 week being to Indoc type stuff, company things etc etc etc. last 2 weeks is systems. You then go to FTDs and then sims. This usually lasts about 3-4 weeks. Then you go to OE, it's generally 2-3 trips depending where you go.


2- the hardest part was all in the beginning, getting your initial tickets. It took a lot of hard work and motivation to keep going. Having good support from yourself and those around you to keep going when you struggle it's key.

3- this can vary. If you totally struggle, ans you don't make progress with extra help, they might ask you to resign, if you need some extra help, Have a good attitude and keep making progress, they'll work with you and give you some extra time in the sims. If you do something really dumb on a line check, you might be pulled off the line and be given training, or sent to a hearing to discuss what happened. It really depends



4- keep your nose clean, work hard, study and keep a positive attitude. You'll get where you wanna get, seems like so far in the distance but enjoy the ride. Grand forks might stink now but you'll look back and wish you were back there. Good luck



Thank you very much

much appreciated!
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:36 PM   #4  
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To all on this board please respond if you like, but consider the following:

The entity that is behind the reduction in flight hours and a pilots readiness for part 121 training is headquartered at the University of North Dakota. It's a great school but they are getting a lot of funding from Airlines4America and the Regional Airline Association.

Kent Lovelace, a professor at that school who also holds the title, Professor and Director of Aviation Industry Relations, is the educator that published several studies on the pilot shortage and these have found their way on to Capitol Hill in discussions about the "pilot shortage."

The University Aviation Association is moving towards supporting the reduction in hours from 1500 to some other lower number and attempting to support that contention by reviewing the background of successful new part 121 trained pilots.

I believe they will be attempting to reduce hours even more for graduates of Aviation Universities. Read it all here.

Regional airlines want to cut co-pilot flight rules. The idea mustn't get off the ground - Chicago Tribune

So by all means respond if you feel like it but understand your response will may very well likely to be used to defend lowering the 1500 hour requirement.
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Old 09-27-2017, 09:43 PM   #5  
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For some reason it looked strange to me, know i understand.
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Old 09-29-2017, 06:04 AM   #6  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdebrey View Post
Hey guys, I'm in an aviation careers planning class and have an assignment where I need these questions answered.

Professor said about a paragraph per question.

This would be a huge help to me.

Thanks, John



The purpose of this interview will be to discuss training at their 121 carrier. Be sure to include the following:



1. Can you briefly describe the types of training you received from the first day you showed up at your current company until you were fully line qualified?
Indoc. Two weeks. Fairly poorly taught. Systems. Two weeks. Appallingly bad. People who knew very little about the airplane reading slides. Flat-panel Trainer. Five days, taught by someone who recently left a different airline and couldn't remember which we way the new company did things... bad. Simulator. Two weeks. 10 sims. Too many. IOE.
2. What was the most challenging part of your training and how did you overcome those challenges?
The fact that it took eight months to complete three months of training. I sold my truck to afford to pay my mortgage. Literally. And the absolute lack of communication from the company regarding training.... I.e., showing up to systems training unsure if we even had an instructor.
3. At your airline, what happens if a pilot experiences problems with their recurrent checkrides or other checking events?
Remdial training. Placed under "increased scrutiny". Fired. In that order.

4. Do you have any advice for me regarding how to best prepare for training when I start my airline career?
Enjoy it. Take it seriously, but get to know your classmates and have fun. There is time for studying and time for a beverage. Memory items, limitations, call-outs, flows, systems. In that order.
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