Go Back   Airline Pilot Central Forums - Find your next job as a Pilot > >
Hangar Talk For non-aviation-related discussion and aviation threads that don't belong elsewhere
 

Welcome to Airline Pilot Forums - Connect and get the inside scoop on Airline Companies

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ. Join our community today and start interacting with existing members. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free.


User Tag List

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-08-2018, 10:15 AM   #1  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Feb 2018
Posts: 14
Default Airline Pilots Needed for Research Survey

Hey everyone, my name is Alex Jones and I'm a commercial pilot finishing up my last year of college before heading off to an airline career. I've been doing research on pilot fatigue for the last few months and am now working on my own study. The study is small-scale and looks to see if jet lag plays a significant role in pilot fatigue. Anyone is eligible so long as you're currently flying regularly scheduled routes. The survey is just 8 questions and shouldn't take longer than 10 minutes to complete. I would appreciate as many responses as I can get and if anyone has any question or concerns feel free to message me.

Survey Link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1F...rm?usp=sf_link
aajones5 is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 10:54 AM   #2  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,317
Default

Quote:
Ascertainment bias arises when data for a study or analysis is collected (or surveyed, screened, or recorded) such that some members of the intended population are less likely to be included than others. The resulting study sample becomes biased, as it is systematically different from the intended population. Ascertainment bias is related to sampling and selection bias.
How can you call it research? You have no way of telling if someone responding is more or less susceptible than someone in the group as a whole, and no way of assessing if those with no axe to grind on this issue are going to respond at all.

What you are going to derive out of this will not have any sort of statistical validity. It may be a number of things, but "research" won't be one of them.
Excargodog is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 11:11 AM   #3  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Feb 2018
Posts: 14
Default

I appreciate the feedback, this is a small study intended to determine the need for more larger scale and comprehensive research in this area. My intended population is airline pilots flying all kinds of routes. Different people's susceptibility to fatigue is not something I had considered, but not something I need to include at the moment.
aajones5 is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 04:43 PM   #4  
Disinterested Third Party
 
Joined APC: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,841
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aajones5 View Post
My intended population is airline pilots flying all kinds of routes. Different people's susceptibility to fatigue is not something I had considered, but not something I need to include at the moment.
You're not remotely interested, so long as you confine yourself to scheduled routes.

Scheduled airlines have the least isssue with fatigue and the greatest protection, as well as multiple layers of circadian protection.

If you really want to know about "jet lag" and it's effects, look at those who still aren't protected by the regulation and who work through numerous time zones on each side of the clock; supplemental carriers who go long distances, work all hours, don't enjoy regulatory protections ensuring circadian adaption and who work longer and harder duty hours across more time zones than scheduled airlines.

That's where you'll get your hard look.

All the work has been done and the matter addressed in depth for scheduled operators. Only the supplementals were carved out of the regulation and face the significant challenge. They're also the only ones excluded from your question, which suggests you're not really interested in real answers, but only rehashing what's already very well known.
JohnBurke is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 05:25 PM   #5  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Feb 2018
Posts: 14
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnBurke View Post
You're not remotely interested, so long as you confine yourself to scheduled routes.

Scheduled airlines have the least isssue with fatigue and the greatest protection, as well as multiple layers of circadian protection.

If you really want to know about "jet lag" and it's effects, look at those who still aren't protected by the regulation and who work through numerous time zones on each side of the clock; supplemental carriers who go long distances, work all hours, don't enjoy regulatory protections ensuring circadian adaption and who work longer and harder duty hours across more time zones than scheduled airlines.

That's where you'll get your hard look.

All the work has been done and the matter addressed in depth for scheduled operators. Only the supplementals were carved out of the regulation and face the significant challenge. They're also the only ones excluded from your question, which suggests you're not really interested in real answers, but only rehashing what's already very well known.
You're very correct on that and that is a significant area of need. The reason I said specifically regularly scheduled routes was because I wanted pilots who had done a decent amount of flying in the last 28 days. The study is not limited to just pilots flying part 121.
aajones5 is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 05:35 PM   #6  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Jan 2018
Posts: 1,317
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aajones5 View Post
You're very correct on that and that is a significant area of need. The reason I said specifically regularly scheduled routes was because I wanted pilots who had done a decent amount of flying in the last 28 days. The study is not limited to just pilots flying part 121.
Does "a decent amount" have an actual numerical value?

Quote:
I appreciate the feedback, this is a small study intended to determine the need for more larger scale and comprehensive research in this area.
No, an actual "study" has a null hypothesis and a meaningful statistical test and is designed to find out if the null hypothesis can be rejected. Something INTENDED "to determine the need for more larger scale and comprehensive research in this area" is called putting a sham study together in hopes of using it to troll for a research project grant. It isn't the same thing.
Excargodog is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 06:49 PM   #7  
On Reserve
Thread Starter
 
Joined APC: Feb 2018
Posts: 14
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Excargodog View Post
Does "a decent amount" have an actual numerical value?



No, an actual "study" has a null hypothesis and a meaningful statistical test and is designed to find out if the null hypothesis can be rejected. Something INTENDED "to determine the need for more larger scale and comprehensive research in this area" is called putting a sham study together in hopes of using it to troll for a research project grant. It isn't the same thing.
This isn't for any kind of research grant, if you want so badly to try to discredit my research this is so I can graduate and pursue an aviation career. I became very interested in pilot fatigue after doing research on it and wanted to study it since it will affect me throughout my career. If you believe I'm trying to be deceptive and pull one over on the pilots its just not true. I'm trying to get simple descriptive statistics to see what the pilots have to say about the current state of fatigue regulations and how jet lag plays its part.
aajones5 is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 07:50 PM   #8  
Gets Weekends Off
 
Joined APC: Oct 2008
Position: JAFO- First Observer
Posts: 758
Default

Gee Whiz! This “soon to be college grad” is trying to finish a project, put a check in the box, graduate with a degree and move on with his aviation career. Have some compassion and empathy. Let’s help him out!
PerfInit is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 08:13 PM   #9  
Disinterested Third Party
 
Joined APC: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,841
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aajones5 View Post
You're very correct on that and that is a significant area of need. The reason I said specifically regularly scheduled routes was because I wanted pilots who had done a decent amount of flying in the last 28 days. The study is not limited to just pilots flying part 121.
Again, see previous response. You say you want pilots who fly a lot and you want scheduled pilots to study "jet lag" (circadian fatigue), yet exclude the pilots that regularly fly thousands of miles on each leg, crossing eight or more time zones, etc, and who don't have the protections to ensure that they become acclimatized to a new time zone upon arrival...in other words, quite possibly the only segment of the airline industry to which your study might actually apply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aajones5 View Post
I'm trying to get simple descriptive statistics to see what the pilots have to say about the current state of fatigue regulations and how jet lag plays its part.
The duty and rest regulations for airline operations were changed several years ago to recognize "jet lag" and circadian disruption by moving flying to or from a given time zone, and to allow crew members to acclimatize to the new time zone.

Fatigue is certainly a major concern for pilots in many segments of the industry, but for all airline pilots save supplemental carriers, it's largely a non-issue because the regulation already takes it into account. The only airline segment for which circadian rhythm is entirely ignored, and which was excluded from the regulation, is the supplemental carrier...the one group you don't want to hear from.

https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-id...17_main_02.tpl

Quote:
Originally Posted by aajones5 View Post
The study is not limited to just pilots flying part 121.
The title of the thread specifically asks for airline pilots, and you've stated that you only want pilots flying scheduled routes. That's specific. Airline pilots flying scheduled operations.

Do you know what Part 121 is?
JohnBurke is offline  
Old 11-08-2018, 09:12 PM   #10  
Moderator
 
tomgoodman's Avatar
 
Joined APC: Feb 2006
Position: 767A (Ret)
Posts: 4,516
Default Thread Closed

Sorry, but the Administrator has sent word that surveys are only allowed pursuant to a Master’s degree at an accredited institution.
tomgoodman is offline  
 
 
 

 
Closed Thread
 



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Any "Latest & Greatest" about Delta? Guard Dude Delta 196325 Today 05:35 AM
Kudos to JetBlue's Pilot Voting Committee! P-3Bubba Major 174 04-23-2014 07:14 AM
Junior at NW/DL? Here's some CPS flowdown info. JungleBus Major 121 12-20-2008 05:13 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:28 PM.


vBulletin® v3.9.3.5, Copyright ©2000-2018, MH Sub I, LLC dba vBulletin
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.3.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Website Copyright ©2000 - 2017 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.1