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Old 06-07-2006, 06:44 PM   #21  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeB525
Why would the autothrottles be deactivated to begin with? What would that gain anyone, aside from the annoyance of having to constantly set the power like you're an RJ?
I have heard (and I could have heard wrong) that Southwest chooses not to use the auto throttle because it is constantly making small adjustments in the engine, which causes certain parts to wear out quicker. Im not too sure if that is actually the reason though. Maybe someone who flies for the airlines could answer this for us?
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Old 06-07-2006, 10:09 PM   #22  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJR_
I have heard (and I could have heard wrong) that Southwest chooses not to use the auto throttle because it is constantly making small adjustments in the engine, which causes certain parts to wear out quicker. Im not too sure if that is actually the reason though. Maybe someone who flies for the airlines could answer this for us?


There's an old saying that goes something like:
"You get what you pay for."
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Old 06-08-2006, 03:48 AM   #23  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJR_
I have heard (and I could have heard wrong) that Southwest chooses not to use the auto throttle because it is constantly making small adjustments in the engine, which causes certain parts to wear out quicker. Im not too sure if that is actually the reason though. Maybe someone who flies for the airlines could answer this for us?
Yes you are wrong.
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Old 06-08-2006, 09:30 AM   #24  
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One time I flew on the SW J-seat to RNO. The auto-throttles were not used. We flew in some Mt wave inbound to RNO. Our airspeed varied from over speed clacker to under speed warning. This went on for about 20 mins. just prior to our decent (which is another very ugly story). Letís just say auto-throttles seemed like a good idea that day.
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Old 06-08-2006, 10:22 AM   #25  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike734
Let’s just say auto-throttles seemed like a good idea that day.
Many of us have experienced mountain wave activity with the autopilot engaged and without auto throttle too. As speed decreases, power is added to avoid an underspeed or approach to stall condition. As speed increases, power is decreased to avoid an overspeed condition. If power is insufficient means to combat mountain waive activity then the altitude hold feature, is disengaged and pitch is used to prevent over or under speed conditions, and ATC is advised accordingly. No matter the sophistication of the auto-flight system, Mother nature usually wins out.

So lets just say that in the conditions you cited, auto throttles would not be of any help either.

Last edited by captjns; 06-08-2006 at 10:30 AM.
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Old 06-08-2006, 11:53 AM   #26  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captjns
So lets just say that in the conditions you cited, auto throttles would not be of any help either.
What? I've flown many thousands of hours in jets with AT up and down the West coast in Mt wave activity. AT works great to avoid the conditions I explained. Only once, in the MD-80, did the PMS ask for more power, (it said, "Select CL power") that took care of it. I never had a problem in the 737. Yes, maybe in extreme Mt wave, but that rarely happens. I don't know what point you were trying to make but I don't think you undermined the point I was trying to make.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:49 PM   #27  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike734
What? I've flown many thousands of hours in jets with AT up and down the West coast in Mt wave activity. AT works great to avoid the conditions I explained. Only once, in the MD-80, did the PMS ask for more power, (it said, "Select CL power") that took care of it. I never had a problem in the 737. Yes, maybe in extreme Mt wave, but that rarely happens. I don't know what point you were trying to make but I don't think you undermined the point I was trying to make.
A/T movement is also a indicator that things outside your window are changing - not unlike the stablizer trim wheel in the 737/727 fleet.

I do not think I would like the "no-throttle" movement of the Airbus. It's a piece of information that's no longer available to you. JMHO.
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Old 06-08-2006, 01:14 PM   #28  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike734
What? I've flown many thousands of hours in jets with AT up and down the West coast in Mt wave activity. AT works great to avoid the conditions I explained. Only once, in the MD-80, did the PMS ask for more power, (it said, "Select CL power") that took care of it. I never had a problem in the 737. Yes, maybe in extreme Mt wave, but that rarely happens. I don't know what point you were trying to make but I don't think you undermined the point I was trying to make.
Same here. ATs do not care what flight conditions you are in. They merely respond to any airspeed change in order to maintain a given IAS or Mach number. ATs do not avoid, nor can they predict mountain wave activity.
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Old 06-08-2006, 02:55 PM   #29  
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Just a question for a SWA pilot, but you have HGS in the newer 37's? Personally, I thought the only airline with HGS was Alaska and Horizon. The only reason I ask is because at the end of the article, they mentioned the pilots not using the heads up display.
Can't use what you don't have.
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Old 06-08-2006, 03:08 PM   #30  
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I think most of SWAs planes have the HGS.. Also maybe Southwest wants their pilots to be alert during their flights and not arm the AT and press LNAV and VNAV and stare out the window...
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