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brownie 02-25-2009 09:00 PM


Originally Posted by ⌐ AV8OR WANNABE (Post 565620)
Agree 100%.

Also, not sure if it played any role in his (Sully's) sub-conscious reasoning but nevertheless as a glider pilot (which I believe applies to Sully too) being able to look out at your approximate landing zone from your side window helps tremendously when judging the landing itself. Since they were in a left turn and Sully was in the left seat that might have helped him in his decision too.

Overall, he scored a perfect glider landing! :D

Who is they? Was there a first officer on that plane:D

⌐ AV8OR WANNABE 02-25-2009 09:03 PM


Originally Posted by brownie (Post 567317)
Who is they? Was there a first officer on that plane:D

Yes, he was obviously listening to his ipod... :D

Jetjok 02-26-2009 03:53 AM


Originally Posted by USMCFLYR (Post 565748)
I'll only speak to the Hornet - but if I lose an engine on takeoff - I climb away **on-speed* which for us means 8.1 alpha (AOA)(L/D max). It is displayed in our HUD as an E bracket. It results in the perfect speed for whatever configuration/weight you happen to be at during the event. If I was really heavy (loaded down with bombs or tanks, etc.....) then I would emergency jettison those items. Once that extra weight is gone you usually don't have a problem with climbing out.

A-6 carrier crash - Google Video#

This video clip shows an A-6 taking off from the carrier and he has an engine failure if I remember correctly. More than likely he is trying to hold **on-speed** and climb away but something else happens, he knows he is going down and tries to jettison the centerline tank as a last ditch effort to save it I imagine. I don't have any knowledge of this particular accident (some on here might) but most engine failure of the catapult emergency proceduress fall along the same lines.

USMCFLYR

Of course let's not forget that Sully and Jeff Skiles didn't have the luxury of knowing in the back of their minds that if they really screwed up the approach, they'd still be able to use their ejection seats. Having an ace in the hole always made my life a little easier when I flew fighters.

JJ

USMCFLYR 02-26-2009 06:08 AM


Originally Posted by Jetjok (Post 567384)
Of course let's not forget that Sully and Jeff Skiles didn't have the luxury of knowing in the back of their minds that if they really screwed up the approach, they'd still be able to use their ejection seats. Having an ace in the hole always made my life a little easier when I flew fighters.

JJ

I think about it everytime I sit in an airplane :eek:

USMCFLYR

Ftrooppilot 02-26-2009 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by seaav8tor (Post 567306)
Depends on the wind. :D

In a no wind situation they will both glide the same distance. The heavier aircraft will get there first because of the higher "L/D Max" speed.


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