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MV-22 Pilot - Mil to Civ - Roadmap advice?

Old 03-25-2016, 07:44 PM
  #11  
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Old 03-28-2016, 03:03 PM
  #12  
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I'm a first tour, pure bred, osprey guy so im wondering if there's any advice for going the airline route if someone only has powered lift time?
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Old 03-28-2016, 03:57 PM
  #13  
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FW. Regionals after you separate.
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Old 03-28-2016, 04:43 PM
  #14  
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For anyone that might be interested:

The good news is that most of the airlines seem to have no problems with V-22 time. They recognize the multi-crew, glass cockpit, FMS-equipped, fixed wing IFR flying we do. We've gotten firsthand info, either by guys who have interviewed and been hired (some of them on this board) or directly from airline HR departments that they count the time as multi-engine fixed. This from Southwest, American, United and Delta. That being said, there are a couple of caveats, at least from the people I've talked to. Two of the guys hired were jet transitions, and the other two did a tour at the VT's, so they all had a fair amount of traditional fixed wing experience in addition to their tiltrotor time. I think we're just now starting to get to a point where there will be tiltrotor-only pilots who have a competitive amount of hours applying. How "much" the airlines are counting osprey-only time will be interesting to see. We just had a guy in my unit get an interview offer from Southwest with around 2100ish total time, 1000 helo/1100 osprey and basically the multi/single engine airplane pic mins to get his atp.

As far as getting the atp, you will have to do a bit of work. As much as it sucks, we're powered lift to the faa. It doesnt matter that you've flown it fixed wing across the Atlantic half a dozen times at 15,000 feet, it's not an airplane to them. You'll need to fly a bit on the side to get your 250 airplane pic, but it's not that bad. You've got some already, and the really expensive part is the 50 hour multi engine requirement, which as a pure osprey pilot, you'll have gotten from C-12's in flight school. You rate your commercial multi/single engine land through the milcomp test from what you got at flight school. Fly some cheap single engine on the side with a buddy to get your 250 and you should be good for the atp. All of the other wickets will be hit by your powered lift time.

For what it's worth, I just did the ATP CTP course and we used the 757 sims at American's facility in Fort Worth. The automation, FMS and CRM used in that are really similar to a V-22. It felt like an osprey with a yoke (a really big one).

Get your atp knocked out, build some hours, dont turn down a pure fixed wing gig if you can get it, and apply when the time comes (and hope those of us ahead of you dont F it up). If you need to do a turn at the regionals, be ready for that, too.
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Old 11-11-2016, 05:53 PM
  #15  
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Brillo, you mentioned that the 50 hour multi-engine requirement for the 250 fixed wing hours can be filled by the C-12 time we get in advanced fight training, but as a part of the 250 PIC time, doesn't the multi-engine time have to be as PIC as well? Were you able to get your ATP after flying the additional 50 or so hours you needed to meet the 250 hour requirement? Could you please give a brief update on how you have been getting along transitioning to civilian aviation, the roadblocks you may have encountered?

I'm a purebred V22 guy, 1,000 hours, up for orders and probably going to the FRS in New River this summer. I'd like to get out instead and apply for the regionals but none of the airline recruiters I've contacted seem to view my powered lift hours without any sort of consideration to the complexities and similarities the airframe has with larger multi-engine fixed wing aircraft. But I get it, they are going strictly by the FAA definitions. I only hope things will get easier as more V22 drivers start getting work in the commercial airline industry.
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Old 11-12-2016, 02:05 PM
  #16  
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Your C-12 time does count toward the 50 ME requirement, as that doesn't have to be PIC. That saves you some significant money, because you will only need to fly single engine airplanes to get your 250 PIC. You will need to fly those until you reach 250 PIC. No way around it for the ATP. The airlines can't do much with your time until you have the ATP. Once you get that, they are much more accepting of the powered lift time.

I've heard of a few regional airline training departments getting individual exemptions for V-22 guys with the local FSDO, but that is on a case by case basis and I have also heard about the FAA in Oklahoma City smacking that down.

I'm still a little over a year out, so can't give you much more insight. Try to find a buddy you can share safety pilot time with to get to 250, get your ATP, and then you should be golden, at least with the regionals.
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Old 11-12-2016, 07:34 PM
  #17  
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You may want to give envoy a call, they have a program for mil helo guys to build that 250 FW, may work for osprey bros as well. Can't hurt to ask. Definitely helps w the C-12 time out of the way. And they count all first pilot time as PIC for your primary flights.

Good luck!


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Old 11-12-2016, 09:18 PM
  #18  
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Awesome, thanks for the info gents!

This has been a stressful weekend as I'm up for orders very soon and I need to decide asap whether to stay in or submit my resignation. I've been going back and forth so many times between doing a few more years or getting out and pursuing commercial aviation. I feel much more comfortable now making the call to get out, especially with the inevitable pilot shortage fast approaching.
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Old 11-13-2016, 03:49 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Capt Stapor View Post
Awesome, thanks for the info gents!

This has been a stressful weekend as I'm up for orders very soon and I need to decide asap whether to stay in or submit my resignation. I've been going back and forth so many times between doing a few more years or getting out and pursuing commercial aviation. I feel much more comfortable now making the call to get out, especially with the inevitable pilot shortage fast approaching.

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Old 11-14-2016, 12:24 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Honeypot View Post
Brillo, you mentioned that the 50 hour multi-engine requirement for the 250 fixed wing hours can be filled by the C-12 time we get in advanced fight training, but as a part of the 250 PIC time, doesn't the multi-engine time have to be as PIC as well? Were you able to get your ATP after flying the additional 50 or so hours you needed to meet the 250 hour requirement? Could you please give a brief update on how you have been getting along transitioning to civilian aviation, the roadblocks you may have encountered?

I'm a purebred V22 guy, 1,000 hours, up for orders and probably going to the FRS in New River this summer. I'd like to get out instead and apply for the regionals but none of the airline recruiters I've contacted seem to view my powered lift hours without any sort of consideration to the complexities and similarities the airframe has with larger multi-engine fixed wing aircraft. But I get it, they are going strictly by the FAA definitions. I only hope things will get easier as more V22 drivers start getting work in the commercial airline industry.
Contact some of the ISR pilot recruiters. I know my company has a couple V22 guys so they've obviously dealt with It some.
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