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-   -   Alaska- For Pilots and Mechanics and those interested (https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/part-135/34109-alaska-pilots-mechanics-those-interested.html)

Kilgore Trout 12-04-2008 02:53 PM

Take Flight Alaska. CFI's and Mechanics Wanted. Not sure how current this is.Take Flight Alaska's Job Opportunities

nhm6408 12-04-2008 08:20 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll have to look into in more. I really want to start flying and get out of school. But I'd also really like to get my A&p so I could keep my options open. My main goal is to fly for an airline one day. It doesn't have to be a major one. So if there is any other advice it would be much appreciated.

AKfreighter 12-04-2008 09:08 PM

In the time it takes to get your A&P (your goal isn't to turn wrenches right?) you could be getting your CFI and building time to get a job flying. An A&P still can't get you Part 135 VFR hour mins.

Kougarok 12-04-2008 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AKfreighter (Post 512064)
In the time it takes to get your A&P (your goal isn't to turn wrenches right?) you could be getting your CFI and building time to get a job flying. An A&P still can't get you Part 135 VFR hour mins.

I agree! I flew in Alaska before I had my A&P license and it didn't seem to make much difference if you had one or not. Most of the employers were more interested in if you could get the job done with out killing anyone or scaring them too bad. If you are not interested in turning wrenches I wouldn't bother.

Having said that it's a nice back up for lean times!

nhm6408 12-05-2008 10:09 PM

Where would be a good place to start out in Alaska? If I dont get my A&P Ill be graduating next December and would like to start working asap. I should have around 300-350tt plus the hours I would get from my float and tail wheel ratings if I dont instruct.

Skysmith 12-05-2008 10:16 PM

Evertsair.com hires low time guys if you're willing to work. You start off as a Flight Engineer on a DC-6 and can move up into FO on the DC-6, C-46, or Emb 120. Company has it's problems but name me one that doesn't. Good group of pilots...hope you like oil!

clearandcold 12-05-2008 11:28 PM

I think that having an A&P would only help you get a job if you had experience on they type of aircraft that the company you are trying to work for flies. Other than that it probably wouldn't do you much good. Something else to think about is that it may be difficult to go back and get the license once you have started your flying career unless you took some time off for an extended period of time.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 02:04 AM

nhm,
There's at least one Evert's pilot prowling around APCF, so maybe they can tell you more about them.
Anyway, I agree with the above post regarding experience on aircraft type for wrenching. Any good company is not going to throw you to the wolves without any experienced mechanics around to help you on an aircraft type that you are unfamiliar with. Remember I talked about that earlier as far as getting into trouble as a pilot mechanic? Don't let any operator put you in a bad place- flying or wrenching. Much more than your certificates riding on it.
Good places to start with around 350 tt?
To be honest, I don't know of any. I gotta be blunt here, If I was a chief pilot looking to hire somebody to shepherd around a 207 or Cherokee Six anywhere in Alaska, especially right now with plenty of pilots who have been exposed to a bit of that stuff, I'd have to go with somebody more seasoned. Not to mention company and insurance minimums. Sorry.
I like your idea of getting the float rating and tailwheel training. Even if you don't have a job waiting for you that immediately requires the training, it's really good stick and rudder stuff. You will love it.
I know you are not fully into the idea of flight instructing, but maybe you could keep thinking about it? I never did it, wish I had. Maybe someday I will. From years of knowing pilots who have done it, I believe it is a great way to keep learning (the most important part), build time, meet aviation people, and get paid for being involved in aviation. Maybe you could instruct in Alaska? Or at Jack Brown's Seaplane base in Florida?
There is another option for becoming an A+P too. Does not require going to A+P school. Basically the FAA says that if you work as a helper directly involved in aircraft maintenance under certain conditions you can take the tests. You'll have to look it up for the exact wording, but it is possible. The high points- 18 months consecutive to take either the Airframe OR Powerplant exam, or 30 consecutive to take them both. Maybe you could flight instruct and be a mechanic's helper? Or continue your schooling, get your A+P, and wrench while flight instructing? The 30 month deal is how I got mine working at an AK 135 outfit. I only know single engine Cessnas, and Beavers and Otters. Walk me up to something really big with no props and I'd have to politely ask for lots and lots of help. I've got a really good resume for single engine VFR operators in AK, but I'm kind of stuck in that, for good or bad right now.
As an aside, If you want to search around APCF, you'll find lots of info and opinion on what a flying career in Alaska can do for, and to you:eek:. Take some of it with a grain of salt.
I sincerely hope you can find a way to do what you want to do with your time in aviation. Try not to get too down, or hung up on how many hours you have, remember only you can decide what is best for you, watch out for innacurate info from others, and keep flying and learning. Alaska will be there for you.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 02:51 AM

Regarding 18 or 30 months experience working in aviation maintenance and then taking the tests for the A, P, or A+P Certificates. Talk to your local FSDO also to make sure you document your work in a way satisfactory to them. I've heard of variations regarding what different FSDO's require. I've also heard different info regarding whether the work experience must be consecutive. Mine was just 30 months straight. Airframe & Powerplant Schools - Obtain information becoming an aircraft mechanic.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 04:08 AM

A beautiful video someone put on Youtube.YouTube - 1990 - Alaska Twin Otter Flying


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