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Kilgore Trout 12-01-2008 10:36 PM

Alaska- For Pilots and Mechanics and those interested
 
Howdy,
Wondering if we can start a new thread on flying and maintaining for those involved and interested in aviation in Alaska? The last thread on AK aviating was closed due to a bit of silliness, perhaps we can avoid that for a while. Maybe we can do something lighthearted for those living the dream,;) and informative for those who might want to be?:rolleyes: Hoping we can use this to share important area operational knowledge, aircraft info, pass on "so there I was" stories (incognito) which might help preserve somebody else's bacon, and inform interested people about opportunities up North. Or/and whatever else you can think of. I also would not mind if one of you knows where I might find a 29-39 year old attractive, witty, well read single female who is fond of scruffy looking, underpaid, extremely handsome adventurer types, but that's probably for another web-site. Questions/comments/complaints welcomed and encouraged (probably). All welcome. Including Canadians, eh? Hey Canada! You out there? I'll buy you a beer next time we meet in Whitehorse!
Cheers,

P.S. -For employment seekers-please research any outfits and operational areas you are interested in carefully. Information regarding accidents/violations is readily available from non-partisan sources (NTSB's monthly accident list, mostly). Protect yourself and your possible future passengers by utilizing available information and the hard earned knowledge of the careful, well seasoned, experienced Alaskan Aviators you may meet at some point . Be careful out there. I apologize for the legal-ese, and generally this part sounds like a bummer, just be mindful that it ain't always that much fun up North. It is pretty awesome though:)

Kilgore Trout 12-01-2008 11:35 PM

Alaska FAA Webcams.Weather Cameras Home - Federal Aviation Administration - (Monday, 12/01/08)

Kilgore Trout 12-02-2008 11:35 AM

Seaplane Jobs Website- SEAPLANE JOBS : Pilot Jobs, Seaplane & Floatplane Jobs & Employment, Seaplane Pilots Association

Kilgore Trout 12-02-2008 11:39 AM

Pilot Career Centre Website.
US, Canadian, and worldwide jobs.http://www.pilotcareercentre.com/PilotJobs.asp

Kilgore Trout 12-02-2008 11:44 AM

A partial listing of Alaska Air Taxi Operations.Alaska Air Taxis, Bush Pilots and Charter Services

Kilgore Trout 12-02-2008 11:46 AM

Fly Alaska job site. Requires membership for job listings.Alaska flight operations and Alaska Flying

proskuneho 12-02-2008 02:58 PM

I'm interested in going to Alaska. Actually, I'm exploring any option to be financially able to have an enjoyable flying career after a decade in management! I'm still instructing and I have just over 1050 tt with over 270 ME. I have a family, so I'm trying to avoid being poor for the next ten years.
I have read so much on the Alaska forums, and I have a few friends that used to live and fly in Alaska. One is going back, and another would if his wife liked it. He is wanting to talk his wife into a summer home there though. From what I hear, Alaska has much of what I want: unblemished natural splendor, friendly people, frontier mystique, fun flying, plenty of adventure, and the opportunity to make great money.
The problem is that it is so far away from our families. It also seems like it is hard to break into Alaska flying unless you have the coveted "Alaska time." I should be close to ATP mins by the time spring hiring comes along, but I still don't think I can make enough cash to support my family that first year. Ahhh, this is the problem in every entry level flying job.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I'm open to anything (so is my awesome wife)- flying fresh salmon in Alaska, skydivers in Florida, tourists in the Caribbean, boxes or checks anywhere, passengers in a domestic or foreign regional, or airline cadets in Dubai or California. It sounds crazy, but it is difficult to find the best road in this terrible market.

nhm6408 12-03-2008 09:55 PM

So I recently ran across this website and so far has provided a lot of information. Right now I am going to Western Michigan University and I realized "real" life is coming up very fast and I need to start looking for a job. It seems the trend at Western is to get you licenses, become a CFI then try and get a job at an airline. I don't want to do this. I would love to come to Alaska and fly there doing whatever. I was wondering if it would be beneficial to get my A&P along with all of my licenses. Would it help me get a job with no Alaska time? But on the flip side it's another year and a half of school along with another year and a half of tuition.

Kilgore Trout 12-03-2008 10:59 PM

nhm,
Howdy,
Well I'll try to keep it kinda short, I re-read my original post and decided that I tend to type too much sometimes.
I can only offer you advice based on my own experience, so please keep that in mind. If others out there have input on this please help out.

I think being a pilot/mechanic in Alaska can be a good thing depending on what kind of operation you are working for. Good points are that you will have the possibility of learning a great deal about your company's aircraft, and earning a paycheck while doing it. You may look attractive for hiring as you will be able to help out many outfits a great deal. A few things to keep in mind though- The A+P certificate, like any pilot's certificate, is a license to learn. The aircraft I've flown and worked on are not terribly complex, but I had the help of great mechanics when I was new to working on them. I would not want to be a pilot mechanic at a not so great company without that kind of guidance and help. Your responsibility as an A+P is just as great as it is as a pilot. You may lose out on some flying to other pilots when something breaks, needs an inspection, or the company does not have enough (or any) mechanics around to work on it. On the other hand, you may have a job year round if/when operations slow for the winter and fewer pilots are needed. You may also be able to troubleshoot or fix your own aircraft when something goes kaput away from base.
It's kind of a double edged sword, and one that can get you in trouble if you are not careful. As I said, both jobs demand that you do your best. I don't know that I would recommend getting an A+P certificate for the purpose of increasing your chances of getting hired. Only if you are truly interested in being a mechanic too, perhaps for a big part of your time in aviation.
I do not regret that I'm a pilot and A+P. It has been good for me so far. I hope to continue learning and growing as both. If you have any more questions let me know and I'll try to help out. I wish you the best whatever course you decide on.

Cheers,
Sorry,:cool: that was pretty long.

skywriter 12-04-2008 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nhm6408 (Post 511349)
So I recently ran across this website and so far has provided a lot of information. Right now I am going to Western Michigan University and I realized "real" life is coming up very fast and I need to start looking for a job. It seems the trend at Western is to get you licenses, become a CFI then try and get a job at an airline. I don't want to do this. I would love to come to Alaska and fly there doing whatever. I was wondering if it would be beneficial to get my A&P along with all of my licenses. Would it help me get a job with no Alaska time? But on the flip side it's another year and a half of school along with another year and a half of tuition.

Yes getting your A and P would help you a lot in Alaska and any where else you would get a job with no Alaska time with a A and P the year and half you spend in school getting it would put you years ahead

Kilgore Trout 12-04-2008 02:53 PM

Take Flight Alaska. CFI's and Mechanics Wanted. Not sure how current this is.Take Flight Alaska's Job Opportunities

nhm6408 12-04-2008 08:20 PM

Thanks for the info. I'll have to look into in more. I really want to start flying and get out of school. But I'd also really like to get my A&p so I could keep my options open. My main goal is to fly for an airline one day. It doesn't have to be a major one. So if there is any other advice it would be much appreciated.

AKfreighter 12-04-2008 09:08 PM

In the time it takes to get your A&P (your goal isn't to turn wrenches right?) you could be getting your CFI and building time to get a job flying. An A&P still can't get you Part 135 VFR hour mins.

Kougarok 12-04-2008 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AKfreighter (Post 512064)
In the time it takes to get your A&P (your goal isn't to turn wrenches right?) you could be getting your CFI and building time to get a job flying. An A&P still can't get you Part 135 VFR hour mins.

I agree! I flew in Alaska before I had my A&P license and it didn't seem to make much difference if you had one or not. Most of the employers were more interested in if you could get the job done with out killing anyone or scaring them too bad. If you are not interested in turning wrenches I wouldn't bother.

Having said that it's a nice back up for lean times!

nhm6408 12-05-2008 10:09 PM

Where would be a good place to start out in Alaska? If I dont get my A&P Ill be graduating next December and would like to start working asap. I should have around 300-350tt plus the hours I would get from my float and tail wheel ratings if I dont instruct.

Skysmith 12-05-2008 10:16 PM

Evertsair.com hires low time guys if you're willing to work. You start off as a Flight Engineer on a DC-6 and can move up into FO on the DC-6, C-46, or Emb 120. Company has it's problems but name me one that doesn't. Good group of pilots...hope you like oil!

clearandcold 12-05-2008 11:28 PM

I think that having an A&P would only help you get a job if you had experience on they type of aircraft that the company you are trying to work for flies. Other than that it probably wouldn't do you much good. Something else to think about is that it may be difficult to go back and get the license once you have started your flying career unless you took some time off for an extended period of time.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 02:04 AM

nhm,
There's at least one Evert's pilot prowling around APCF, so maybe they can tell you more about them.
Anyway, I agree with the above post regarding experience on aircraft type for wrenching. Any good company is not going to throw you to the wolves without any experienced mechanics around to help you on an aircraft type that you are unfamiliar with. Remember I talked about that earlier as far as getting into trouble as a pilot mechanic? Don't let any operator put you in a bad place- flying or wrenching. Much more than your certificates riding on it.
Good places to start with around 350 tt?
To be honest, I don't know of any. I gotta be blunt here, If I was a chief pilot looking to hire somebody to shepherd around a 207 or Cherokee Six anywhere in Alaska, especially right now with plenty of pilots who have been exposed to a bit of that stuff, I'd have to go with somebody more seasoned. Not to mention company and insurance minimums. Sorry.
I like your idea of getting the float rating and tailwheel training. Even if you don't have a job waiting for you that immediately requires the training, it's really good stick and rudder stuff. You will love it.
I know you are not fully into the idea of flight instructing, but maybe you could keep thinking about it? I never did it, wish I had. Maybe someday I will. From years of knowing pilots who have done it, I believe it is a great way to keep learning (the most important part), build time, meet aviation people, and get paid for being involved in aviation. Maybe you could instruct in Alaska? Or at Jack Brown's Seaplane base in Florida?
There is another option for becoming an A+P too. Does not require going to A+P school. Basically the FAA says that if you work as a helper directly involved in aircraft maintenance under certain conditions you can take the tests. You'll have to look it up for the exact wording, but it is possible. The high points- 18 months consecutive to take either the Airframe OR Powerplant exam, or 30 consecutive to take them both. Maybe you could flight instruct and be a mechanic's helper? Or continue your schooling, get your A+P, and wrench while flight instructing? The 30 month deal is how I got mine working at an AK 135 outfit. I only know single engine Cessnas, and Beavers and Otters. Walk me up to something really big with no props and I'd have to politely ask for lots and lots of help. I've got a really good resume for single engine VFR operators in AK, but I'm kind of stuck in that, for good or bad right now.
As an aside, If you want to search around APCF, you'll find lots of info and opinion on what a flying career in Alaska can do for, and to you:eek:. Take some of it with a grain of salt.
I sincerely hope you can find a way to do what you want to do with your time in aviation. Try not to get too down, or hung up on how many hours you have, remember only you can decide what is best for you, watch out for innacurate info from others, and keep flying and learning. Alaska will be there for you.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 02:51 AM

Regarding 18 or 30 months experience working in aviation maintenance and then taking the tests for the A, P, or A+P Certificates. Talk to your local FSDO also to make sure you document your work in a way satisfactory to them. I've heard of variations regarding what different FSDO's require. I've also heard different info regarding whether the work experience must be consecutive. Mine was just 30 months straight. Airframe & Powerplant Schools - Obtain information becoming an aircraft mechanic.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 04:08 AM

A beautiful video someone put on Youtube.YouTube - 1990 - Alaska Twin Otter Flying

SkyHigh 12-06-2008 08:04 AM

Alaska Time
 
Often the requirement for "Alaska Time" is a way of scaring off lower 48 guys who they don't want to hire anyway. When times are tuff up there they will hire guys without the AK time.

Alaska operators are leery of lower 48 pilots since most have a different background and attitude that does not accommodate the self reliant and often risk taking stance that is needed in Alaskan aviation.

Since the rest of aviation is in the dump right now I imaging that it will be sometime before they are in the mood to hire someone who is not an Alaskan pilot already.

SKyHigh

nhm6408 12-06-2008 08:44 AM

I never even thought of instructing in Alaska. Thats a great idea. That way I could build Alaska time for what Skyhigh was talking about. Then get to know more people in the industry. Hey thanks guys for the help. Opened up new ideas for me. And the way it sounds the A&P is a toss up to help get a job. Well see. Maybe try and get a job flight instructing then work on my A&P while Im up there learning on planes that I would be flying. Thanks again. Any other bits of info would help and go along way. Oh yea, the float and tail wheel is a must. It just seems like it would be to much fun and provide great skills you couldnt get other wise.

SkyHigh 12-06-2008 09:37 AM

Instructing
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by nhm6408 (Post 512857)
I never even thought of instructing in Alaska. Thats a great idea. That way I could build Alaska time for what Skyhigh was talking about. Then get to know more people in the industry. Hey thanks guys for the help. Opened up new ideas for me. And the way it sounds the A&P is a toss up to help get a job. Well see. Maybe try and get a job flight instructing then work on my A&P while Im up there learning on planes that I would be flying. Thanks again. Any other bits of info would help and go along way. Oh yea, the float and tail wheel is a must. It just seems like it would be to much fun and provide great skills you couldnt get other wise.

I started my career as an instructor on Merrill Field in Anchorage. It isn't easy being an instructor in AK. The wages are not very high and there are few students. The cost of living in Anchorage is punishing. I had to work several jobs in order to get through. It took a long time before I was able to move on to flying in the bush.


Skyhigh

Kougarok 12-06-2008 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kilgore Trout (Post 512751)
A beautiful video someone put on Youtube.YouTube - 1990 - Alaska Twin Otter Flying

Excellent video! It makes me miss my youth. I flew Twotters for Ryan and Cape Smythe including on skis. It wasn't a very good ski airplane.

Kilgore Trout 12-06-2008 11:07 AM

Yeah, I really like that video. Like how he included the people out at the places he flew to. Hey, nhm- here's a link to Everts' employment page. Looking for a mechanic's helper in Anchorage according to this. Also, in case you did not know, the University of Alaska offers an aviation maintenance program along with flight stuff. Maybe cheaper to live in a dorm while checking out AK?
Everts-http://www.evertsair.com/Employment.htm

Clutch Cargo 12-06-2008 12:46 PM

I agree with all of the above, but there's more to consider about flying up here than just the flying. As an instructor you won't make much(nothing new there), not enough to support a family on. Your spouse will have to work also.
You should also consider the fact, which can be considerable, of length of time away from your family. Most bush schedules are 2 weeks on 2 off or 20 days on 10 off.
I'm not trying to dissuade you in any way but I believe the more you know about the lifestyle up here the more you can prepare your family for it.
As some of the previous posters have already said, do your homework on prospective employers, many are good, but the bottom line is they are still in business to make a profit.
If you can afford it, bring your family up for a look see, preferably in the winter and not just to Anchorage. Alaska is an easy sell in the summertime.
There will always be airplanes to fly up here, so if it doesn't happen right away don't give up. Whatever you decide, I wish you and your family well.

Monguse 12-11-2008 09:28 AM

Alaska flying jobs
 
Seasonal Alaska flight operations are geared primarily to tourism. This includes scenic flights, bear viewing, sports fishing and hunting (guided and unguided). Not all operators are involved with hunting, on the other hand, some are geared strictly to hunting.

Many of them focus on scenic tours and sports fishing. Scenic tours go on year 'round, but really crank during the summer months. Sports fishing happens from May through September and even into October for some areas of Alaska. There are also lodges which operate their own airplanes and, for the most part, cater to wealthy people seeking unique and remote fishing and hunting opportunities.

Many places in Alaska are busiest during the winter months (especially Bethel) because they transport supplies, mail and people to and from town and between native villages and remote settlements. Many villages and settlements are totally dependent on airplanes for the transportation of groceries, mail, construction materials and passenger flights to and from hubs such as Anchorage, Fairbanks or Bethel, Ketchikan, Sitka or Juneau, from villages in the interior and along the Yukon River and in southeast or western Alaska.

Oil exploration and supplying oil-industry-related camps on the North Slope provide other major wintertime uses for airplanes. Wintertime North Slope flight operations are usually flown by experienced pilots flying turbine-powered aircraft in the winter darkness...much of the time on instruments.

Some Alaska flying-jobs are offered any time of the year. But most Alaska pilot job postings begin seasonally in late December, increase in January and peak in February/March. They begin to subside in April and slow down more in May. Most initial and recurrent training classes for Alaska flight operations regulated by FARs Part 135 (most of them) are finished by the end of May and some classes are held as early as mid-April. There are a few larger companies that hold initial training classes at other times of the year, but most operators have hired their seasonal pilots by the end of May. Nevertheless, some pilot jobs do become available any time of the year.

There are many different kinds of operators in Alaska. Some of them pay well, even have medical benefits, provide their pilots with scheduled days off, and have excellent maintenance. There are a few that even have retirement programs.

On the other hand there are a few operators who have their pilots doing menial grubby tasks between flights or during slow periods, have no scheduled days off, provide no medical insurance or any other benefits, get by minimally on maintenance, and generally act like they're doing you a favor to put you to work. And there is everything in between. So, as has been repeated a couple of times on this thread, try to find out as much as possible about any given Alaska flight operation before committing.

Flying for lodges can be fun or problematic and anything in between. Generally you don't accumulate nearly as much flight time flying for a lodge as you do flying regular air taxi. Most lodges who operate their own airplanes do so on floats and tend to hire high-time float pilots. Many of them pay well, up to $10,000 a month for the 3 and a half to 4 and a half month season. Lodge flying consists mainly of flying out in the morning with a few fishermen, hanging out all day guiding, cooking lunch, and flying back to the lodge for supper. Sometimes, lodge flying will include changing locations one or more times during the day, but this is the exception rather than the rule. An advantage to lodge flying is that they provide your food and lodging and sometimes at the end of the season, substantial tips from tip sharing. Some lodges have you eat with the guests, others relegate their employees to a back room eating situation and food that is more utility style than the gourmet meals being eaten by the paying guests.

Since the winter of 1975 I have flown wheels, skis and floats as a pilot for various Alaska flight operations from southeast Alaska to the Arctic Ocean. I flew mail, parts, supplies, construction materials, groceries, equipment and passengers on wheels and skis to remote Alaska locations, and on floats to commercial fishing vessels, to various destinations on lakes, rivers and saltwater locations. I flew as a pilot/guide for flyout fishing lodges, for licensed big-game hunting guides, for biologists who were radio-tracking polar bears, musk ox and other critters, for geologists installing earthquake monitoring instruments, for scientists to their research vessels, for coal and oil exploration personnel, salvage operations, medivacs, gold miners, explosives for mining companies etc. I flew 18 seasons as a fish spotter for commercial herring fishing all over Alaska from Sitka to Togiak and 12 seasons for commercial salmon fishing in Prince William Sound, and have flown all year 'round and seasonally for various Alaska Air Taxi operations over the years.

The experience you'll gain flying in Alaska is invaluable from a personal and professional standpoint. Alaska time is looked upon by many airlines with unreserved respect. Nevertheless, lots of pilots who start out in Alaska end up staying there for their whole flying career because it's fun, challenging, personally rewarding and adventurous.

Your time as a professional pilot in Alaska will give you more personal satisfaction than almost any other civilian flying job. Alaskan pilots provide unique and necessary services that generate heartfelt appreciation, respect and enduring friendships.

Skill, judgement and intuition all come into play daily in various combinations as you gain Alaska flying experience. The trade off between flying five and a half hours in a straight line at 40,000 feet or winding your way up a wilderness river or flying low through a range of high mountains, is all a matter of personal priority. Money is probably a big influence. Alaska bush pilots don't make as much money as the pilot who carries hundreds of people in turbo-jets or many tons of cargo in long straight lines over vast distances, but they exercise their many skills on a daily basis and have a lot more fun.

www.flyalaska.com

FlyAK 02-07-2009 10:54 AM

I was wondering if someone with more current experience could chime in with current Part 135 pay rates for western alaska? I worked for Hageland a few years ago and seemed to remember...

2500/month- Chicken
3500/month- Sled
4500/month- Caravan
5500/month- 406

These rates were based on 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off schedule.

Are these rates still good? Thanks, just curious as I'm getting laid off in the next month or so and am contemplating my options.

Kougarok 02-08-2009 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlyAK (Post 554030)
2500/month- Chicken
3500/month- Sled
4500/month- Caravan
5500/month- 406

These rates were based on 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off schedule.

I know what a Sled is! What's a Chicken, 172?

FlyAK 02-08-2009 09:52 AM

Yeah, a play on "skyhawk" = chicken

no current pay rates out there though, huh?

Kougarok 02-09-2009 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlyAK (Post 554522)
Yeah, a play on "skyhawk" = chicken

no current pay rates out there though, huh?

I talked to Jr Beans a few months ago. We didn't talk pay rates but he did say there would probably be jobs available in Barrow this spring! I think in the 406.

clearandcold 02-09-2009 09:00 PM

I have a hard time believing that anyone off of the street would walk into anything except a 207 at Hageland much less a 406. Most of the guys flying the twin have probably been with the company 5-6 years.
With regard to their pay scale I know it is now based on a combination of a daily rate and some sort of hourly compensation.

AiRegency 02-09-2009 11:39 PM

I thought I heard Hagelands was done. Bought out by Frontier FS. Is that incorrect? And if it isn't then one last question for you. Is D.S. (aka Hollywood, aka The Streak) still there? I miss that guy. :)

FastEasy 02-11-2009 06:31 PM

There are definately some good jobs to be had in that area. If you can get a job the experience is a plus anywhere you may go afterwords. KNow a few guys that flew in that territory and they get aot of respect from employers.

akaviator 02-16-2009 06:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AiRegency (Post 555662)
I thought I heard Hagelands was done. Bought out by Frontier FS. Is that incorrect? And if it isn't then one last question for you. Is D.S. (aka Hollywood, aka The Streak) still there? I miss that guy. :)

I was in Anchorage in December and ran into a buddy flying for them in Bethel. They're still doing the 135 side of things with the sleds and Caravans, all 1900 ops are Frontiers. I have no idea what's going on with the 406's.

Last pay scale for Hageland I heard was daily scale: $150 chicken, $200 sled, $250 van. Frontier was paying $55 and $20 per hour in the 1900's, and their Navajo drivers were making about $5000 a month.

Remember lower 48 guys, this is NOT easy duty and if you have a family it will take its toll. Not being negative, spent most of my life in Alaska and have seen it over and over.

Kougarok 02-16-2009 06:54 PM

Bering Air is looking for mechanics: Bering Air Alaska
I know a few guys who transitioned from mechanic to pilot working for them.

FlyOrDie 02-16-2009 11:05 PM

Took me 9 months to get a job after moving from SoCal, I left a 135 job with good references and still people treated me like I was just some transient outsider. So don't give up whatever you do. I finally found my current gig by looking at this Alaska Job Center Network website. Like everywhere else in aviation its all about timing. I was hired as the youngest and lowest time pilot (1300tt 200 multi) in my class and the next 3 classes after me had guys with 250 hours. Other operators felt the same crunch and PenAir even invited me back to interview, I wisely declined. Its not a happy place over there.

I could have probably gotten a job quicker but I wanted to stay in town so I targeted companies like PenAir and Era, needless to say that didn't work out very well. I interviewed at PenAir and the panel treated me like I had some sort of incurable disease because my last job happened to be in SoCal. This is totally normal behavior, I know resumes are sorted by address.

One thing that I hope this thread does not plunge into is saying that things are different in Alaska ie you're encouraged to break rules, true there are those companies still somehow flying but they are now the exception rather than the norm. I get paid to fly from A to B in legal weather in a legal airplane. I still don't know why its considered normal for a select very vocal group to brag about pushing it? People like that are the reason Alaska has such a terrible reputation. I freely admit that Alaska is a tough environment with a huge lack of infrastructure and weather information, the entire state has only 37 airports with TAFS.

Good luck to anyone trying to make the jump from outside, its challenging, rewarding, and sometimes even fun up here.

akaviator 02-17-2009 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FlyOrDie (Post 560749)
I get paid to fly from A to B in legal weather in a legal airplane. I still don't know why its considered normal for a select very vocal group to brag about pushing it? People like that are the reason Alaska has such a terrible reputation. I freely admit that Alaska is a tough environment with a huge lack of infrastructure and weather information, the entire state has only 37 airports with TAFS.

+1. We'd fly legal VFR enroute at 500 and 2, and guys would brag about being able to get into such and such a village at 200 and 1. In VFR equipped 207's. My answer was always the same...WHY? Turn around if the weathers crap, don't go below your personal mins, and live to tell about it. Trust me, flying it legally will still get you puckered up once in awhile!

SkyHigh 02-17-2009 07:52 AM

Push the weather
 
No one ever directly told me to push the weather, but it was obvious that those who could get the job done were promoted. Even the passengers were pushy. Once they trusted you as a pilot they would try to pressure you into taking more weight, worse weather and shorter runways.

They like risk takers up there. I have seen more than a few get sent home because they could not handle the pressure. Alaska flying is a very different place. If you have never hand propped a plane before or gotten one stuck in the mud then it will be a difficult transition.

Skyhigh

VAviator 02-17-2009 08:48 AM

FlyOrDie -

Was your first gig in AK with Everts, or did you build up some time somewhere else?

And what is the upgrade time for the DC6 into the right seat and the left? I'm assuming those low time guys you talked about started out as flight engineers

Thanks!

-VAviator


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