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Myocarditis and FAA Medicals

Old 10-05-2023, 10:54 AM
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Default Myocarditis and FAA Medicals

Will myocarditis affect ones chances of obtaining a FAA medical? Is a SODA obtainable? Is a stress test an option to see if they qualify?
Asking for a friend.
Thanks in advance.
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Old 10-05-2023, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by TheFly View Post
Will myocarditis affect ones chances of obtaining a FAA medical? Is a SODA obtainable? Is a stress test an option to see if they qualify?
Asking for a friend.
Thanks in advance.
Tell your friend it isnít an automatic disqualifier:



But whether it requires a SODA or FAA review will depend on why the myocarditis occurred, when it occurred, how significant it was, how much residual it left, and whatever other issues the FAA decides are important. Some people have mild myocarditis with little if any residual, some have severe cases that go on to cardiomyopathy and need a heart transplant. It ainít a one size fits all problem.
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Old 10-05-2023, 12:03 PM
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Myocarditis just means inflammation of heart muscle. Generally that comes and goes away with no permanent change to the structure or function of the heart. In that case it is of no consequence to a Medical.

If your friend has no ongoing symptoms, probably fine.
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Old 10-05-2023, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Brickfire View Post
Myocarditis just means inflammation of heart muscle. Generally that comes and goes away with no permanent change to the structure or function of the heart. In that case it is of no consequence to a Medical.

If your friend has no ongoing symptoms, probably fine.
Well, no. Not true at all. Myocarditis must be deferred.

https://www.faa.gov/ame_guide/app_pr...item36/amd/occ

​​​​​​​

Guide for Aviation Medical Examiners

Decision Considerations - Aerospace Medical Dispositions
Item 36. Heart - Other Cardiac Conditions

The following conditions must be deferred:
  1. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) [formerly called hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM); idiopathic hypertrophic sub-aortic stenosis (IHSS)]
  2. Non-compaction cardiomyopathy
  3. Cardiac Transplant - see Disease Protocols
  4. Cardiac decompensation
  5. Congenital heart disease
  6. Hypertrophy or dilatation of the heart as evidenced by clinical examination and supported by diagnostic studies. (Concentric LVH with no dilatation can be issued by the AME if no symptoms.)
  7. Pericarditis, endocarditis, or myocarditis
  8. Cardiac enlargement or other evidence of cardiovascular abnormality, If the applicant wishes further consideration, a consultation is required, preferably from the applicant's treating physician. It must include a narrative report of evaluation and be accompanied by an ECG with report and appropriate laboratory test results which may include, as appropriate, 24-hour Holter monitoring, thyroid function studies, ECHO, and an assessment of coronary artery status.
  9. Anti-tachycardia devices
  10. Implantable defibrillators (ICDs)
  11. Anticoagulants may be allowed, if the condition is allowed.
  12. Cardioversion (electrical or pharmacologic), may be allowed. A current, complete cardiovascular evaluation (CVE) and follow up Holter monitoring test is required. A 1-month observation period must elapse after the procedure before consideration for certification.
  13. Any other cardiac disorder not otherwise covered in this section.
  14. Hypotension. A history of low blood pressure requires elaboration. If the Examiner is in doubt, it is usually better to defer issuance rather than to deny certification for such a history.


For all classes, certification decisions will be based on the applicant's medical history and current clinical findings. Evidence of extensive multi-vessel disease, impaired cardiac functioning, precarious coronary circulation, etc., will preclude certification. Before an applicant undergoes coronary angiography, it is recommended that all records and the report of a current cardiovascular evaluation (CVE), including a maximal electrocardiographic exercise stress test, be submitted to the FAA for preliminary review. Based upon this information, it may be possible to advise an applicant of the likelihood of favorable consideration.

Last updated: Wednesday, July 27, 2022
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Old 10-05-2023, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnBurke View Post
Well, no. Not true at all. Myocarditis must be deferred.

https://www.faa.gov/ame_guide/app_pr...item36/amd/occ
There it is, in black and white. Thanks.
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Old 10-06-2023, 07:23 AM
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Keep in mind that this does not preclude issuance of a medical certificate: it means that it cannot be issued by an aviation medical examiner in the field. The medical examiner must defer the application for consideration by the Office of Aerospace Medicine. The FAA may require various tests and data: it is recommended that results of a complete cardiovascular exam and a stress test be sent to the FAA along with the initial deferral. If the FAA requires more, it will be made known.
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Old 10-06-2023, 07:28 AM
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My point was that, unlike something like seizures, myocarditis is something that has the possibility to be one and done. Itís something you had like chicken pox or knee surgery and not something that the faa will likely care about long-term
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Old 10-06-2023, 07:41 AM
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Myocarditis is neither "one and done" (whatever that means), nor is it of "no consequence to a medical."

It should be noted that myocarditis may be a short-term condition, but may also lead to issues such as cardiomyopathy, which carries with diagnosis, longer term implications, testing, etc. The nature of myocarditis may be that additional testing, (including cardiovascular examination Holter monitoring in the case of observed arrhythmia, and stress testing), may be required in subsequent medical applications. Further, cardiomyopathy, which may develop from myocarditis, carries a third class medical restriction, if a medical can be issued at all.

No cardiac issue should ever be considered "of no consequence to a medical" with regard to the FAA.

Note that about 20% of myocarditis cases lead to cardiomyopathy and longer term issues, though this is more complicated than a statistic, as the majority of cases of cardiomyopathy are determined not as a result, but looking back without a clearly definable or proven cause, and are thus classed as idiopathic (cause unknown). This may be the case even with someone who has had myocarditis, if a direct correlation cannot be established.

https://www.myocarditisfoundation.or...r-myocarditis/

Last edited by JohnBurke; 10-06-2023 at 08:26 AM.
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Old 10-06-2023, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnBurke View Post
Myocarditis is neither "one and done" (whatever that means), nor is it of "no consequence to a medical."

It should be noted that myocarditis may be a short-term condition, but may also lead to issues such as cardiomyopathy, which carries with diagnosis, longer term implications, testing, etc. The nature of myocarditis may be that additional testing, (including cardiovascular examination Holter monitoring in the case of observed arrhythmia, and stress testing), may be required in subsequent medical applications. Further, cardiomyopathy, which may develop from myocarditis, carries a third class medical restriction, if a medical can be issued at all.

No cardiac issue should ever be considered "of no consequence to a medical" with regard to the FAA.

Note that about 20% of myocarditis cases lead to cardiomyopathy and longer term issues, though this is more complicated than a statistic, as the majority of cases of cardiomyopathy are determined not as a result, but looking back without a clearly definable or proven cause, and are thus classed as idiopathic (cause unknown). This may be the case even with someone who has had myocarditis, if a direct correlation cannot be established.

https://www.myocarditisfoundation.or...r-myocarditis/
You do you
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Old 10-06-2023, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Brickfire View Post
You do you
No, I do science, and I do fact, and I provide citations, links, and references to factual information that is useful and applicable to the thread.

You looked something up on google, became an instant expert, and posted bad information, and then tried to double down and rescue it.

Stick to posting opinions in threads where people's careers or lives aren't affected by you trying to be more than you are.

If you do intend to post about legal, medical, or professional issues, at least take the time to offer more than a wild guess or unqualified opinion. If you do offer that opinion, then own up to it as say as much. Other posters here have provided links and quotes and useable information. Do that.
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