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ptarmigan 03-02-2019 08:44 AM

thoughts on stalls
 
New article on the topic

JamesNoBrakes 03-02-2019 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ptarmigan (Post 2773358)

Quote:

At this point, the stickshaker activated, the autopilot independently disconnected, and the pilot increased power and used full left rudder to arrest the roll.
And here we go...

TiredSoul 03-03-2019 12:06 AM

Round and round we go....

kevbo 03-05-2019 06:43 AM

Ailerons an spoilerons do a much better job at high AOA. Many pilots would be better off engaging the gust lock and drinking some coffee instead of trying to fight an upset situation.

JamesNoBrakes 03-05-2019 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevbo (Post 2775114)
Ailerons an spoilerons do a much better job at high AOA. Many pilots would be better off engaging the gust lock and drinking some coffee instead of trying to fight an upset situation.

Ailerons (or spoilers for that matter) for the transport category aircraft that stall near the tips first and may be experiencing slideslip from yaw to further decay the AOA? During the extended envelope training a key point was made that reducing the AOA and unloading the aircraft had been "washed out" of training over the years, to the point where when wings drop people were trying to "ride the shaker" and force the wings back up with rudder an ailerons, never correcting the AOA issue in the first place, either at all, or to the extent necessary, given the very gradual C/L curve of transport category wings (not shaped like your GA Cessna). I don't agree about doing nothing, that gradual curve where the slope is nearly flat has caused a lot of "not sure what is going on?" situations due to not actively reducing AOA. A lot of those "wild ride" stall/yaw incidents were due to never (significantly) reducing the AOA.

Mesabah 03-05-2019 03:40 PM

I'm not a fan of the engineering behind the stick shaker activation. I would much rather have something along the lines of the Q-Alpha energy state indicator or similar. https://www.kansas.com/news/business...132377769.html
It also indicates how much float you will have at round out, possibly preventing runway overruns.

USMCFLYR 03-05-2019 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevbo (Post 2775114)
Ailerons an spoilerons do a much better job at high AOA. Many pilots would be better off engaging the gust lock and drinking some coffee instead of trying to fight an upset situation.

That does depend on the aircraft though.

JamesNoBrakes 03-05-2019 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by USMCFLYR (Post 2775577)
That does depend on the aircraft though.

Just the idea that someone would slam in a bunch of rudder while stalling is...appalling :)

USMCFLYR 03-06-2019 01:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JamesNoBrakes (Post 2775664)
Just the idea that someone would slam in a bunch of rudder while stalling is...appalling :)

True. I was specifically thinking of my former aircraft where at HIGH AOA (30+) you intentionally used the rudders for control. Influence with a tad of aileron; but control the turn/bank with the rudders. Once you were actually out-of-control then the second step of the immediate action was 'feet off the rudders' :)

Glenntilton 03-06-2019 05:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevbo (Post 2775114)
Ailerons an spoilerons do a much better job at high AOA. Many pilots would be better off engaging the gust lock and drinking some coffee instead of trying to fight an upset situation.


Umm no, just the opposite.


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