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-   -   Not understanding AoA indicators... (https://www.airlinepilotforums.com/safety/84956-not-understanding-aoa-indicators.html)

FDXLAG 06-18-2016 12:01 PM


Originally Posted by cardiomd
Teaching "no more than 30 degrees bank" is probably reasonable but I would insist on more knowledge of what presents the actual dangers from any aviator (that is: it is not the bank itself that is a problem).
Which brings us back to the original topic of this thread. What better tool for helping to teach why it is not 60 degrees of bank that is the problem than an AOA indicator.

cardiomd 06-20-2016 06:17 PM


Originally Posted by FDXLAG (Post 2147248)
Which brings us back to the original topic of this thread. What better tool for helping to teach why it is not 60 degrees of bank that is the problem than an AOA indicator.

Yes, you do "get it." I agree, it might be a good teaching tool, and I've never argued otherwise. It would certainly be better than saying "never bank more than 30 degrees" or screaming like a schoolgirl when somebody banks further without loading the wing.

Many pilots can understand the concept without the direct AOA install and can fly appropriately. Some definitely appear to find it difficult though, occasionally with fatal results. If you don't know, you shouldn't be flying. :cool:

cardiomd 02-02-2017 06:14 PM


Originally Posted by BoilerUP (Post 1918993)
Cirruses are NOT dangerous.

I flew a SR22 in my previous job and have probably 700 hours in the thing - getting a "feel" for them is not an issue whatsoever.
...
The single biggest driver of Cirrus accidents is the aeronautical decisionmaking of the people driving the damn things...

I guess this guy should have been more qualified then. There is a reason I didn't buy the nice beautiful SR22 I test flew. I feel there are numerous design build factors about this plane that leads to the observed outcomes at the hands of a wide variety of pilots.

Kathryn's Report: Cirrus SR22, N401SC: Fatal accident occurred January 25, 2017 near Municipal Airport (KSSF), San Antonio, Texas

BoilerUP 02-02-2017 09:13 PM


Originally Posted by cardiomd (Post 2293697)
I guess this guy should have been more qualified then.

You know absolutely nothing about the cause or factors related to this accident...isn't it a wee bit early to attribute it to the airframe?

HuggyU2 02-03-2017 06:18 AM


Originally Posted by bozobigtop (Post 2145108)
I am tired of seeing the accident reports for this aircraft because the aircraft was more than what the pilot can handle.

There are a flood of these reports coming in, I take it?

You are aware the Cirrus' fatal mishap rate for the past 36 months is .63 per 100,000 flying hours... aren't you?

rickair7777 02-03-2017 09:10 AM


Originally Posted by cardiomd (Post 2293697)
I guess this guy should have been more qualified then. There is a reason I didn't buy the nice beautiful SR22 I test flew. I feel there are numerous design build factors about this plane that leads to the observed outcomes at the hands of a wide variety of pilots.

Kathryn's Report: Cirrus SR22, N401SC: Fatal accident occurred January 25, 2017 near Municipal Airport (KSSF), San Antonio, Texas


Highly qualified military pilots dying in piston ASEL is nothing new, and I've commented on that before. Apparently GA is different enough that high-performance mil skills don't transfer completely without some disciplined critical thinking and study/training.

I don't think the airplane has design issues, it flies just fine. I think the market niche attracts a certain type of pilot: busy (ie time pressured), successful, and typically pretty self confidant. The glass cockpit (one of the first ones in GA) probably attracts folks who have an IFR mission. The glass and parachute probably enable a false sense of security in some highly confidant pilots.

badflaps 02-03-2017 02:13 PM

We had a guy at my little airport torque roll into the trees on G/A (Gusty.) We got him down with a ladder. A month later he showed up with a new one.

sailingfun 02-10-2017 10:48 AM


Originally Posted by rickair7777 (Post 2294085)
Highly qualified military pilots dying in piston ASEL is nothing new, and I've commented on that before. Apparently GA is different enough that high-performance mil skills don't transfer completely without some disciplined critical thinking and study/training.

I don't think the airplane has design issues, it flies just fine. I think the market niche attracts a certain type of pilot: busy (ie time pressured), successful, and typically pretty self confidant. The glass cockpit (one of the first ones in GA) probably attracts folks who have an IFR mission. The glass and parachute probably enable a false sense of security in some highly confidant pilots.

This pilot had a extensive civilian flying background since he was in high school.

rickair7777 02-11-2017 05:59 PM


Originally Posted by sailingfun (Post 2298868)
This pilot had a extensive civilian flying background since he was in high school.

I was speaking broadly, not necessarily about any particular pilot. Point being that the cirrus flies fine, and if it has a poor track record (I'm not sure that it does) I suspect that owner demographics play a role.

HuggyU2 02-12-2017 08:58 AM


Originally Posted by badflaps (Post 2294286)
We had a guy at my little airport torque roll into the trees on G/A (Gusty.)

Torque roll? A Cirrus?
Can you post the NTSB report, or at least give me the date that happened?


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