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Old 04-26-2020, 03:59 PM   #81  
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So given the lighter loads frequently flying lately, I know climb performance has improved. How has that affected crosswind landing handling?
Less inertia, so potentially less stable in the flare.

That can even mean the speed drops off faster, resulting in a harder landing. A heavier plane might hold it's speed and therefore lift a little better due to inertia. Seems the bottom can drop out quicker when you're light.
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Old 04-26-2020, 06:57 PM   #82  
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Less inertia, so potentially less stable in the flare.

That can even mean the speed drops off faster, resulting in a harder landing. A heavier plane might hold it's speed and therefore lift a little better due to inertia. Seems the bottom can drop out quicker when you're light.
I would agree with all that. I tend the keep the power in longer through the flare because the crosswind controls create more drag just as that lack of inertia is also coming into effect.

Not much of an issue at the moment because contrary to the pax guys, most of our loads are at record highs and it seems like I'm at or within a few thousand pounds of max landing weight every flight.
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Old 04-27-2020, 04:43 AM   #83  
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I don’t have any experience in transport aircraft, but I would assume that NWS doesn’t engage until nose gear WOW—and I’d imagine there is some blending logic to keep the jet from instantaneously snapping in the commanded NWS angle on touchdown?

Or am I giving the engineers too much credit?
You are giving them to much credit. Most transport category aircraft limit nosewheel movement via the rudder pedals to about 7 degrees. Aerodynamic forces have a much greater effect until the aircraft slows substantially.
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Old 04-27-2020, 08:09 AM   #84  
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So given the lighter loads frequently flying lately, I know climb performance has improved. How has that affected crosswind landing handling?
Its a slight impact being lighter. Not really a conscious consideration though.
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Old 04-27-2020, 08:33 AM   #85  
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Its a slight impact being lighter. Not really a conscious consideration though.
Very aircraft dependent, IMO. In a widebody freighter that may see landing weight swings of 100K-200K+ lbs. from one flight to the next, it is very much a consideration.
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Old 04-27-2020, 12:21 PM   #86  
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Very aircraft dependent, IMO. In a widebody freighter that may see landing weight swings of 100K-200K+ lbs. from one flight to the next, it is very much a consideration.
It’s huge in an RJ as well considering general landing technique but the crosswind portion of that technique not no much.
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Old 05-01-2020, 07:55 PM   #87  
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Heavier is easier to land well. When I flew B737's way back when a heavy 737-400 was almost a guaranteed grease job, while a light 737-300 just about had to be shot down.
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Old 09-30-2020, 10:52 AM   #88  
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Great tips, but surely this information should be in the respective FCTM and is largely type specific? It's been a while since I last changed type, but take-off and landing geometry are published in the Boeing FCTM, for tail and pod strikes.

Also as previously mentioned, for the 777:
Quote:
The airplane can land using crab only (zero sideslip) up to the landing crosswind guideline speeds.
The maximum demonstrated crosswind is 38 knots (we have a dry limit of 45) along with the additional note:
Quote:
Sideslip only (zero crab) landings are not recommended with crosswind components in excess of 28 knots.
Apart from the outboard pods, I imagine that the 747 is similar to the 777, in that inertia plays a significant part of the ‘self correction’. As long as you are on the centre-line, and travelling straight down the runway, that’s where you are going to go...
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