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Old 03-23-2017, 06:18 PM   #41  
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Originally Posted by Tpinks View Post
Of course you won't, because they are in the system and it won't affect them.

Just like you won't ever see Mainline pilots stand up for regional pilots... "I'm at mainline now, so what happens down there doesn't affect me..."
Mmmm or maybe it's the quality of their new first officers? Just a thought....
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Old 03-24-2017, 07:48 AM   #42  
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There are plenty who are far better pilots at 500 hours than some others at the magic 1000/1500 number. The regionals hand out CJOs like business cards today. Get the hours, don't say anything stupid in the interview and you got the job. Why not reduce the hour requirement and make the hiring process more competitive?
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Old 03-24-2017, 08:01 AM   #43  
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There are plenty who are far better pilots at 500 hours than some others at the magic 1000/1500 number. The regionals hand out CJOs like business cards today. Get the hours, don't say anything stupid in the interview and you got the job. Why not reduce the hour requirement and make the hiring process more competitive?
This is the exact reason WHY there is a hours requirement. The regionals have proven not to be responsible in choosing quality pilots over cheap pilots. The reason Colgan happened, aside from very poor airmanship from the Captain is that the airline refused to distance itself from a subpar aviator. The argument in favor of the 1500/1000 hour rule is that it gives you experience that you don't get with a wet commercial.

The pilot shortage was always coming. It was delayed by age 65 and then accelerated by the ATP rule. If we go back to 500 hour pilots, there will still be a shortage. It won't make the process more competitive. The airlines are going to have to replace almost half their workforce in 10 years. Tens of thousands of pilots.

The reason you are getting weak pilots at 1000 hours is because the pay has finally reached a point where Joe Midlife Crisis can justify taking a stab at it. The people who have left the industry are still staying away, although the pay increase is starting to bring them back.

I don't disagree that the ATP rule is arbitrary. Are there really bad 1500 hour pilots flying VFR direct to their $100 hamburger every weekend? Absolutely. Are there really good 500 hour pilots who have solid IFR and airmanship skills? Absolutely. Unfortunately, there had to be something done to keep 200 hour 40 day wonders out of regional jets, the easiest and most logical way to do it was just make everyone get an ATP and provide cutouts for structured training.
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Old 03-24-2017, 08:12 AM   #44  
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Call to action = Done. 1500 should be the absolute minimum for a pilot at an airline. There's a reason the ATP requires it.

-- Goggles Pisano (2500TT/350 Multi -- earned through slogging it out instructing/135 for 7 years when hired at first airline.)
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Old 03-24-2017, 10:48 AM   #45  
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In addition to doing the ALPA campaign, please also email the Transportation Committee directly and express your concerns.

Main feedback email: [email protected] and the general email is [email protected]
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Old 03-24-2017, 02:29 PM   #46  
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I agree safety is key which is why everyone should support FAA inspectors do all checkrides versus company check airmen. Write your Congressman/woman so we can make the skies safer.
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Old 03-24-2017, 02:37 PM   #47  
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I agree safety is key which is why everyone should support FAA inspectors do all checkrides versus company check airmen. Write your Congressman/woman so we can make the skies safer.
The FAA inspector's​ job with the airline is not to give checkrides. If it became that, the cost would be almost paralyzing to the FAA. They do perform spot inspections. Although, I wouldn't oppose being checked by the FAA.
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Old 03-24-2017, 11:19 PM   #48  
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As your constituent, a professional airline pilot, and a member of the Air Line Pilots Association, Int’l (ALPA), I am writing to bring your attention to a matter that is important to pilots, the flying public and me personally: upholding landmark aviation safety legislation, the Airline Safety and FAA Extension Act of 2010. This law significantly improved training and qualification requirements for first officers – and improved the safety of our skies. It is a measure that was written in blood, and should not be weakened in any way, shape or form. I am asking you to ensure that any pilot flying with me has the training necessary to be a safe and successful commercial airline pilot.

The Federal Aviation Administration has identified 31 accidents over a nine-year period that government and industry designed the current minimum qualifications to address. These included four fatal accidents that cost 150 people their lives. Since the FAA implemented the new qualifications in 2013, our country has not had a single passenger fatality due to an accident on a scheduled U.S. passenger airliner (Part 121). The qualifications include a minimum number of hours controlling aircraft (1,500 hours for pilots without formal classroom training), training specifications, and other safety protocols. There is a direct correlation between the decline of accidents and these mandates.

There are special interests in Washington, D.C. who, for reasons of profit, seek to weaken our air safety regulations. Some claim these standards are too stringent and reduce the number of pilots available. But let’s be clear; there real shortage falls with our regional airlines and its willingness to pay qualified pilots a decent salary. That is where we should focus. Degrading U.S. aviation safety requirements is not the solution for our airlines’ economic problem.

Furthermore, the facts clearly show that there is not currently a pilot shortage in the U.S. Since July 2013, the FAA issued more than 25,500 active Air Transport Pilot (ATP) certificates, the certification required to serve as a professional commercial airline pilot. That number exceeds even the most optimistic pilot forecast needs.

Most airlines enjoy an excess of pilot applicants. Regional airlines that have increased compensation, added flow-through opportunities to mainline carriers, and created better working environments have seen a large increase in applicants for pilot jobs. The small number of carriers unable to attract pilots offer poor compensation packages and working conditions, and inadequate career opportunities. We should not jeopardize safety because some small air carriers aren’t willing to fairly compensate commercial airline pilots.

Professional pilots are highly qualified, technically trained individuals with the skills to choose many other career paths. Your safety is my top priority on each and every flight. Join us in keeping our air safety system the safest mode of transportation in the world. I urge you to support common sense and oppose any attempts to change the Airline Safety and FAA Extension Act of 2010. I look forward to hearing back from you on this very important issue.
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Old 03-25-2017, 07:12 AM   #49  
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If they get rid of the 1500 hour rule you can say goodbye to signing bonuses, higher hourly wages, etc at the regional level. Also any hopes of a major pilot shortage that would affect the major/legacy carriers can be kissed goodbye. Are there guys out there who could come in with 250 hours and never bust a checkride and be a great pilot?? Sure there are....but anyone currently at a regional or anyone who has their 1500 hours certainly doesn't want it. Keep us the pilots a commodity and force the regionals to pay us more and compete for our services until we move onto the majors.
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Old 03-25-2017, 08:06 AM   #50  
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If they get rid of the 1500 hour rule you can say goodbye to signing bonuses, higher hourly wages, etc at the regional level. Also any hopes of a major pilot shortage that would affect the major/legacy carriers can be kissed goodbye. Are there guys out there who could come in with 250 hours and never bust a checkride and be a great pilot?? Sure there are....but anyone currently at a regional or anyone who has their 1500 hours certainly doesn't want it. Keep us the pilots a commodity and force the regionals to pay us more and compete for our services until we move onto the majors.
Exactly! The whole point of mandating ATP minimums so that one may become an airline pilot is to kill the regionals, or at the very least to elevate starting pay to something more livable. When pay is $17k for someone starting, they are forced to make sacrifices which makes them overwork, or live in conditions such as sleeping in crash pads after a long commute in order to arrive at work on time. Fatigue is a huge issue and is a major contributor to roughly 20% of aviation accidents according to the NTSB! It's no joke. It is good for safety that ATP minimums are required to be hired by an airline because it puts enormous pressure on the regionals which seek to take advantage of the system and pay pilots $10k if they could escape with doing so! The whole point is to avoid altogether another Colgan Air flight 3407!!!
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