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Old 03-13-2013, 10:52 PM   #1  
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Default Skylink Jets

Just saw a posting from the site in orange for lear 35 FO. Anyone know anything about this operation? First red flag I see is it says pay for your own type rating. Anyway just looking to hear anything you guys n gals may know.
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:05 PM   #2  
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Another thought just came to mind as well. With regards to paying for your type rating; that could be justified based off of the working conditions and pay you can expect to make correct? What reason would a good company have for telling you pay your own type rating? Only reason I would see is not wanting to waste money on a student who could washout.
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Old 03-14-2013, 07:15 AM   #3  
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I don't know the outfit. While some corporations, like ours, require a type rating for all new hires, no insurance company I know of actually requires one to sit in the right seat.

Washing out is actually not what these companies are concerned about. New hires bailing with fresh type ratings is. It happens, a lot. Their rationale is, if you are willing to pay for your own, you'll more than likely, stick around for awhile.........

I paid for my own back in 1988. Rented the jet. Took the checkride. It enhanced my career. It helped me get a job as a Learjet ground school instructor and later helped me get a job as a direct entry captain instead of the FO position I applied for.

That said, you need to ask yourself whether paying for it yourself would enhance your career more quickly.

Good luck
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:07 PM   #4  
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Originally Posted by Hawker Driver View Post
I don't know the outfit. While some corporations, like ours, require a type rating for all new hires, no insurance company I know of actually requires one to sit in the right seat.

Washing out is actually not what these companies are concerned about. New hires bailing with fresh type ratings is. It happens, a lot. Their rationale is, if you are willing to pay for your own, you'll more than likely, stick around for awhile.........

I paid for my own back in 1988. Rented the jet. Took the checkride. It enhanced my career. It helped me get a job as a Learjet ground school instructor and later helped me get a job as a direct entry captain instead of the FO position I applied for.

That said, you need to ask yourself whether paying for it yourself would enhance your career more quickly.

Good luck
Exactly... Washing out is not the biggest reason companies want you to arrive with the rating or at least pay for it or a portion of it. Until about the early eighties, many companies paid for type ratings. They already figured you had the goods and were trainable. The primary switch away from that practice is simply due to people leaving. It is not necessarily a red flag.
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:42 PM   #5  
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Default Additional thoughts on a type rating...

Even in todays world, you might still manage a type rating such as a Lear for free (at least out of pocket) or at considerable discount. In some cases there is actually a benefit to not arriving with it; especially in the case of a PIC type $$. The reason being is that if you call cold to FSI or others you will be quoted the retail or higher rate. Many charter companies do such a volume with initials and recurrent that they receive a substantial discount. This can be passed to you, after hire. Another avenue is to pick a reputable, and hopefully busy, charter company, that you desire to stay with. Arrive with your Comm, Instr, Multi and hopefully a CFI. Don't immediately seek a flying position. Get your dispatcher's certification and go to work doing that. You will learn a ton about the business, Wx, Wt & Bal, Regs. and scheduling. Also help the mechanics in the shop or assist any other way you can with the operation. Let the boss know you would be happy to help them get an aircraft ready at 03:00. Sneak into the ground school room and learn everything you can, about a Lear for instance. Talk to the pilots and get the gouge and gotcha's. After a year or so of this the company will get to know, trust and value you and could quite likely offer a flying position and take care of the rating. I know it's old school but it still works...
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Old 03-14-2013, 03:05 PM   #6  
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Even in todays world, you might still manage a type rating such as a Lear for free (at least out of pocket) or at considerable discount. In some cases there is actually a benefit to not arriving with it; especially in the case of a PIC type $$. The reason being is that if you call cold to FSI or others you will be quoted the retail or higher rate. Many charter companies do such a volume with initials and recurrent that they receive a substantial discount. This can be passed to you, after hire. Another avenue is to pick a reputable, and hopefully busy, charter company, that you desire to stay with. Arrive with your Comm, Instr, Multi and hopefully a CFI. Don't immediately seek a flying position. Get your dispatcher's certification and go to work doing that. You will learn a ton about the business, Wx, Wt & Bal, Regs. and scheduling. Also help the mechanics in the shop or assist any other way you can with the operation. Let the boss know you would be happy to help them get an aircraft ready at 03:00. Sneak into the ground school room and learn everything you can, about a Lear for instance. Talk to the pilots and get the gouge and gotcha's. After a year or so of this the company will get to know, trust and value you and could quite likely offer a flying position and take care of the rating. I know it's old school but it still works...
Some great advice!
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