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Old 05-04-2009, 04:59 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geosynchronous View Post
500 feet per nautical mile divided by 6076' (one nautical mile) x 100 will give you the required climb gradient.

500/6076x100= 8.23%

Take your gradient times your groundspeed to get a climb rate in feet per minute

8.23x150= 1235 feet per minute
Would someone care to explain the last part for me? How does the gradient %times groundspeed translate into FPM?

Thanks!
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Old 05-05-2009, 03:47 AM   #22
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Sure!

For example, if you have a rise of 500 feet per mile, and the run is one nautical mile, you divide rise over run, move the decimal over two places (x 100) and then you have a gradient.

A good rule of thumb is to take the gradient times your groundspeed to have and estimated climb rate in feet per minute. Or, you can look at the rate of climb table in the front of the Jeppesen (tables and codes) book.

I'm dusting off my trigonometry here, so mathematically the vertical distance that you are climbing equals the sine of 8.23 times the opposite over the hypotenuse: take that distance and divide it by 360 to arrive at feet per minute.

Last edited by geosynchronous; 05-05-2009 at 04:00 AM.
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Old 05-06-2009, 07:07 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetjockee View Post
Try this-

Ft per NM divided by 6000 times 100, this will give you the Climb Gradient..

500
----- X 100 = .0833333 X 100 = 8.33% Climb Gradient
6000

500' = Ft per NM

6000' = How many feet in a NM ( I believe its 6032' per NM, I just round it off )
that better be a chick's a$$
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Old 10-31-2014, 08:24 AM   #24
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How do you calculate FT/NM?

Thanks
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Old 10-31-2014, 11:54 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AF330 View Post
How do you calculate FT/NM?

Thanks
groundspeed / 60 = Z (nm per minute)

Climb rate / Z = Ft per NM
.................................................. ..

120kts / 60 = 2 nm per minute

2000 / 2 = 1000 ft per nm
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Old 10-31-2014, 09:14 PM   #26
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Get ultranav.. Does it all for you
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Old 11-01-2014, 03:51 AM   #27
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Thanks RI830
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