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Seeking advice on an ambitious plan to fly co

Old 04-19-2024, 11:33 PM
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Question Seeking advice on an ambitious plan to fly co

Hello all, I'm from the UK and it has come to light that I am ineligible for the CAA Class 1 certification following my attempts to rectify a failed medical assessment. Consequently, I find myself temporarily turning to instructing, a measure I'll elaborate on shortly. Regrettably, the prospect of commercial flight within the United Kingdom now eludes me. Nevertheless, I am able to secure a Class 2, allowing me the opportunity to pursue an instructor's license.

My strategic course from this point forward entails embarking on said path and, in due course, relocating to somewhere such as the United States to seek employment as an instructor, in hopes that the school will assist in the acquisition of a work visa. One compelling reason behind this decision stems from the lack of students in my current residence of Wales, UK. Even my father, who occupies a role as a PPL instructor at the preeminent flying school in Wales, finds himself constrained to part-time work due to the scarcity of students. It is my fervent hope that a move to America will present avenues for full-time employment.

As previously alluded to, my aspirations extend beyond instructing, encompassing the attainment of a commercial pilot's license. Sadly, such aspirations find scant feasibility within the UK. Hence, I contemplate the feasibility of pursuing an FAA license while under a work visa in the US, thereafter seeking employment with an airline, thereby extending my visa tenure.

I am acutely aware that my proposed course of action is packed with ambition and plenty of risks. Nonetheless, if I am to realize my ambition of ascending to the realm of jet flying, I must undertake calculated risks. Moreover, the pursuit of the ATPL modular curriculum in the US while engaged in instructing stands to render the endeavour significantly cheaper than the UK (a sum >120,000).

Certainly, further thought will be put into it before any financial commitments, but that's why I've turned to this forum for input once again.

Any insights, past experiences, or just general advice would be received with utmost appreciation.

bakerin
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Old 04-20-2024, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bakerin View Post

Any insights, past experiences, or just general advice would be received with utmost appreciation.

bakerin
Come to the US. There's a whole lot more to do than airline flying, and a great deal of it does not require a first class medical.
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Old 04-21-2024, 03:15 AM
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You can be an airline FO (SIC) in the US with a second class medical, but for the most part you need a first class to get hired at an airline.

If you downgrade to second class once employed you can remain an FO.
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Old 04-21-2024, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by rickair7777 View Post
You can be an airline FO (SIC) in the US with a second class medical, but for the most part you need a first class to get hired at an airline.

If you downgrade to second class once employed you can remain an FO.
That depends on the company, so they must do their research if looking for something that niche.
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Old 04-21-2024, 09:27 AM
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My understanding is that the ICAO class 1 is more equivalent to the US FAA Class 2.

But depending on the details there may be a waiver in the US regardless.

yes, there's lots of opportunity in the US to instruct professionally. Both private students, sim instructors and a decent niche for type transitions and the like for part 91 operators of airplanes without sims - pretty much everything from a Bonaza to a PC12 and any sort of piston twin.
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Old 04-23-2024, 04:14 PM
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Agreeing with above. The first issue - it would seem - would be to find out if you might be eligible for a waiver for US Class 1 physical. I believe that AMAS (among others) can give you their professional assessment based upon your case and what the FAA has allowed Special Issuances for in the past for around $75 if I recall correctly.

https://www.aviationmedicine.com/con...questionnaire/
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Old 04-24-2024, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by bakerin View Post
Hello all, I'm from the UK and it has come to light that I am ineligible for the CAA Class 1 certification following my attempts to rectify a failed medical assessment.

Any insights, past experiences, or just general advice would be received with utmost appreciation.

bakerin
The FAA is not an easy path. I've struggled with the process and it is a much of a waiting game.

Regarding your Class 1, I wonder what it is.

If it has anything to do with chemical dependency or driving while intoxicated, then it will follow you over here.

This is an example. If your denial was due to chemical dependency, etc, even though some employers might not "care" as much as others,
if you wanted to fly for any company that operates within Canadian airspace, it could be an issue. This is just an example. Others would know more about it than I do.

I've had paperwork issues with the FAA medical process that is related to finding VA records that were in a facility that has closed.
This has caused me such a headache over the years and I've learned that sitting on my hands is sometimes all that I can do. That is beside the point, I know.

Have you considered how you might come to the United States to work? Did you apply for a visa or the immigration lottery?

//Chow (not ciao)

Last edited by Chow; 04-24-2024 at 07:02 AM. Reason: clarification
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Old 04-24-2024, 08:23 AM
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Your two biggest obstacles are getting the right to work in the US and getting a first class medical. You haven't given us enough information to help you with either one.

I have heard you can enter the US on an F1 student visa, convert your ratings, and find someone to sponsor you with the right to work in the US as a flight instructor for a year at a time. While converting your ratings you will not be able to work. Some of the regional airlines and ACME carriers will sometimes hire Australian pilots on an E3 visa. If you don't have an E3 visa, you will need a green card and likely a full ATP to be considered by the US airlines as a foreigner. That means getting lucky with the immigration lottery or marrying an American.

I would think it would be an expensive road to take with no guarantee of ever making it above modest flight instructor pay. Be sure you pick a warm climate like Arizona or Florida or you won't get enough flight instruction hours to pay your bills. Also look for big flight schools with a steady stream of students. I understand following a dream but you're going to have to consider the risk vs reward carefully.
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Old 04-24-2024, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by bakerin View Post
Hence, I contemplate the feasibility of pursuing an FAA license while under a work visa in the US, thereafter seeking employment with an airline, thereby extending my visa tenure.
bakerin
You won't find any US airline who will hire a foreign pilot with anything other than a green card or an Australian E3 visa. You won't be able to get a loan to pay for flight training and you won't be able to work while on a student visa. To get a work visa you need a sponsor for a specific job. The airlines won't sponsor you. A flight school may, after you obtain your ratings, but the work visa and sponsorship will need to be renewed on an annual basis.
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Old 04-25-2024, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Chow View Post

This is an example. If your denial was due to chemical dependency, etc, even though some employers might not "care" as much as others,
if you wanted to fly for any company that operates within Canadian airspace, it could be an issue. This is just an example. Others would know more about it than I do.
DWI/DUI history has also been an issue with being able to fly from the U.S. into Canada.
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