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Old 03-27-2012, 04:57 AM   #1  
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Default Dme/dme rnp-0.3 na

Can someone please explane this to me?
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:04 AM   #2  
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I figured it out just ask Richie Lengel...
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Old 03-27-2012, 08:49 AM   #3  
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I'm guessing you see it on an approach plate. It means that if your aircraft uses DME/DME to as the sole means to establish location you can't use that particular procedure. Not a big issue for most light GA aircraft.

Larger aircraft generally use a combination of ways to determine location. For example, my aircraft uses (in this order):

GPS/GPS
GPS
DME/DME
VOR/DME
VOR/VOR
IRS
Dead Reckoning using last know position, heading and speed.
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Old 03-27-2012, 03:55 PM   #4  
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RNP means Required Navigation Performance. So the 0.3 means the equipment must be accurate to a circle of 3/10 of a NM or your position.

See the link below:
Required navigation performance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-27-2012, 10:11 PM   #5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AirbusA320 View Post
RNP means Required Navigation Performance. So the 0.3 means the equipment must be accurate to a circle of 3/10 of a NM or your position.

See the link below:
Required navigation performance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Good point. I kinda implied that, but left it out. Of course if it's an approach that requires RNP 0.3 and you can't meet those tolerances (ie the aircraft is certified at RNP 0.3), then it doesn't matter how your aircraft establishes position.
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Old 03-28-2012, 12:34 PM   #6  
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Johnny150:

As the others have said. You probably have seen this on an approach plate where there is mountainous terrain or lack of adequate navaids. In this instance, aircraft which use DME/DME for navigation will be unable to maintain 0.3RNP and as thus, are not allowed to fly the approach.
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